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Caribou Lou
Highball
Highball
is the name for a family of mixed alcoholic drinks that are composed of an alcoholic base spirit and a larger proportion of a non-alcoholic mixer.Contents1 Etymology 2 History 3 See also 4 ReferencesEtymology[edit] The name may refer to the practice of serving drinks in tall glasses, or the dining cars of trains powered by steam locomotives, where the engine would get up to speed and the ball that showed boiler pressure was at its high level, known as "highballing". Alternatively, the name may have come from early railroad signals with raised globes meaning "clear track ahead".[1] History[edit] Initially, the most common highball was made with Scotch whisky
Scotch whisky
and carbonated water,[2] known as a "Scotch and soda". There are many rivals for the fame of mixing the first highball, including the Adams House in Boston.[3] New York barman Patrick Duffy claimed the highball was brought to the U.S
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Highball (other)
Highball is a type of alcoholic drink Highball may also refer to:Contents1 In film 2 In music 3 Other 4 See alsoIn film[edit]Highball (film), a film by Noah Baumbach Highballing to Victory, short US propaganda film made toward the end of World War II expressing the importance of material and transportation in the war effortIn music[edit]Highball Roller, 2009 debut album by punk rock group Sorry and the Sinatras Highball with the Devil, 1996 studio album by Les Claypool and the Holy MackerelOther[edit]Highball glass, a drinking vessel Highball Wilson (1878-1934), professional baseball pitcher the British Highball bouncing bomb project from World War 2 Express railroad service, a high speed train given non-stop track clearance High ball, a climbing term for a tall boulder problem Highball magazine, a Gaelic Games magazineSee also[edit]USS High Ball, US Navy ship names Lowball (other)This disambiguation
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Collins Glass
A collins glass is a glass tumbler which typically will contain 300 to 410 millilitres (10 to 14 US fl oz).[1] It is used to serve mixed drinks, especially Tom Collins
Tom Collins
or John Collins cocktails. It is cylindrical in shape and narrower and taller than a highball glass. See also[edit]Old Fashioned glassReferences[edit]^ Herbst, Sharon; Herbst, Ron (1998). The Ultimate A-to-Z Bar Guide. New York: Broadway Books
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Brandy
Brandy
Brandy
is a spirit produced by distilling wine. Brandy
Brandy
generally contains 35–60% alcohol by volume (70–120 US proof) and is typically drunk as an after-dinner digestif. Some brandies are aged in wooden casks, others are coloured with caramel colouring to imitate the effect of aging, and some are produced using a combination of both aging and colouring. Varieties of wine brandy can be found across the winemaking world
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Cognac
Cognac
Cognac
(/ˈkɒnjæk/ KON-yak or /ˈkoʊnjæk/ KOHN-yak; French pronunciation: ​[kɔ.ɲak]) is a variety of brandy named after the town of Cognac, France. It is produced in the surrounding wine-growing region in the departments of Charente
Charente
and Charente-Maritime. Cognac
Cognac
production falls under French Appellation d'origine contrôlée designation, with production methods and naming required to meet certain legal requirements. Among the specified grapes Ugni blanc, known locally as Saint-Emilion, is most widely used.[2] The brandy must be twice distilled in copper pot stills and aged at least two years in French oak barrels from Limousin
Limousin
or Tronçais
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Beer
Beer
Beer
is one of the oldest[1][2][3] and most widely consumed[4] alcoholic drinks in the world, and the third most popular drink overall after water and tea.[5] Beer
Beer
is brewed from cereal grains—most commonly from malted barley, though wheat, maize (corn), and rice are also used. During the brewing process, fermentation of the starch sugars in the wort produces ethanol and carbonation in the resulting beer.[6] Most modern beer is brewed with hops, which add bitterness and other flavours and act as a natural preservative and stabilizing agent. Other flavouring agents such as gruit, herbs, or fruits may be included or used instead of hops
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Death In The Afternoon (cocktail)
Death in the Afternoon, also called the Hemingway or the Hemingway Champagne,[1][2] is a cocktail made up of absinthe and Champagne, invented by Ernest Hemingway. The cocktail shares a name with Hemingway's book Death in the Afternoon, and the recipe was published in So Red the Nose, or Breath in the Afternoon, 1935 cocktail book with contributions from famous authors.[3][4] Hemingway's original instructions were:"Pour one jigger absinthe into a Champagne
Champagne
glass. Add iced Champagne until it attains the proper opalescent milkiness. Drink three to five of these slowly."[3]It is claimed that the cocktail was invented by Hemingway after he spent time in the Left Bank, Paris, and enjoyed the absinthe there.[1] The original printed recipe for the drink claimed that it was invented "by the author and three officers of H.M.S. Danae after having spent seven hours overboard trying to get Capt
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Absinthe
Absinthe (/ˈæbsɪnθ, -sæ̃θ/; French: [apsɛ̃t]) is historically described as a distilled, highly alcoholic (45–74% ABV / 90–148 U.S. proof) beverage.[1][2][3][4] It is an anise-flavoured spirit derived from botanicals, including the flowers and leaves of Artemisia absinthium ("grand wormwood"), together with green anise, sweet fennel, and other medicinal and culinary herbs.[5] Absinthe traditionally has a natural green colour but may also be colourless. It is commonly referred to in historical literature as "la fée verte" (the green fairy). Although it is sometimes mistakenly referred to as a liqueur, absinthe is not traditionally bottled with added sugar; it is therefore classified as a spirit.[6] Absinthe is traditionally bottled at a high level of alcohol by volume, but it is normally diluted with water prior to being consumed. Absinthe originated in the canton of Neuchâtel in Switzerland in the late 18th century
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University Of Delaware Press
A university (Latin: universitas, "a whole") is an institution of higher (or tertiary) education and research which awards academic degrees in various academic disciplines
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Chūhai
Chūhai
Chūhai
(チューハイ or 酎ハイ), often sold as Chu-Hi as a canned drink, is an alcoholic drink originating from Japan. The name chūhai is an abbreviation of "shōchū highball" (焼酎ハイボール). Traditional chūhai is made with shōchū and carbonated water flavored with lemon, though some modern commercial variants use vodka in place of shōchū. The flavors available have recently multiplied, including lime, grapefruit, apple, orange, pineapple, grape, kyoho grape, kiwi, ume, yuzu, lychee, peach, strawberry cream, and cream soda. For the chūhai sold in bars and restaurants, the alcohol content can be quite low, allowing those with a low tolerance for alcohol to drink safely. Canned chūhai, however, can have alcohol levels as high as 9% (18 proof) and is often sold in convenience stores and vending machines
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Shōchū
Shōchū
Shōchū
(焼酎) is a Japanese distilled beverage less than 45% alcohol by volume. It is typically distilled from rice (kome), barley (mugi), sweet potatoes (satsuma-imo), buckwheat (soba), or brown sugar (kokutō), though it is sometimes produced from other ingredients such as chestnut, sesame seeds, potatoes or even carrots. Typically shōchū contains 25% alcohol by volume,[1] which is weaker than whisky or standard-strength vodka but stronger than wine and sake
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Japanese Whisky
Japanese whisky
Japanese whisky
is a style of whisky developed and produced in Japan. Whisky
Whisky
production in Japan
Japan
began around 1870, but the first commercial production was in 1924 upon the opening of the country's first distillery, Yamazaki. Broadly speaking the style of Japanese whisky
Japanese whisky
is more similar to that of Scotch whisky
Scotch whisky
than other major styles of whisky. There are several companies producing whisky in Japan, but the two best-known and most widely available are Suntory
Suntory
and Nikka. Both of these produce blended as well as single malt whiskies and blended malt whiskies, with their main blended whiskies being Suntory
Suntory
kakubin (角瓶, square bottle), and Black Nikka Clear
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Oolong
Oolong
Oolong
( /ˈuːlɒŋ/) (simplified Chinese: 乌龙; traditional Chinese: 烏龍; pinyin: wūlóng) is a traditional Chinese tea (Camellia sinensis) produced through a process including withering the plant under strong sun and oxidation before curling and twisting.[1] Most oolong teas, especially those of fine quality, involve unique tea plant cultivars that are exclusively used for particular varieties. The degree of oxidation can range from 8–85%,[2] depending on the variety and production style. Oolong
Oolong
is especially popular in south China and among Chinese expatriates in Southeast Asia,[3] as is the Fujian
Fujian
preparation process known as the Gongfu tea ceremony. Different styles of oolong tea can vary widely in flavor
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Cuba Libre
Rum
Rum
and Coke, or a Cuba
Cuba
Libre (/ˈkjuːbə ˈliːbreɪ/; Spanish pronunciation: [ˈkuβa ˈliβɾe], "Free Cuba" ("free" here is an adjective, not a verb), is a highball cocktail consisting of cola, rum, and traditionally lime juice on ice. The cocktail originated in the early 20th century in Cuba, after the country won independence in the Spanish–American War. It quickly became popular across Cuba
Cuba
and in many other countries, and has been one of the world's most popular alcoholic drinks. Traditionally, the cola ingredient is Coca- Cola
Cola
("Coke"), and the alcohol is a Cuban light rum such as Bacardi
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Railway Semaphore Signal
Semaphore is of the earliest forms of fixed railway signals. These signals display their different indications to train drivers by changing the angle of inclination of a pivoted 'arm'. Semaphore signals were patented in the early 1840s by Joseph James Stevens, and soon became the most widely used form of mechanical signal
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Distilled Beverage
A distilled beverage, spirit, liquor, hard liquor or hard alcohol is an alcoholic beverage produced by distillation of liquid drinks made with grains, fruit, or vegetables that have already gone through alcoholic fermentation. The distillation process purifies the liquid and removes diluting components like water, for the purpose of increasing its proportion of alcohol content (commonly expressed as alcohol by volume, ABV).[1] As distilled beverages contain significantly more alcohol, they are considered "harder" – in North America, the term hard liquor is used to distinguish distilled beverages from undistilled ones. As examples, this term does not include beverages such as beer, wine, mead, sake, or cider, as they are fermented but not distilled. These all have a relatively low alcohol content, typically less than 15%. Brandy
Brandy
is a spirit produced by the distillation of wine, and has an ABV of over 35%
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