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Captain Easy
Captain Easy, Soldier of Fortune was an American action/adventure comic strip created by Roy Crane that was syndicated by Newspaper Enterprise Association beginning on Sunday, July 30, 1933. The strip ran for more than five decades until it was discontinued in 1988.Contents1 Characters and story 2 Sunday strips 3 After Roy Crane 4 Reprints 5 References 6 External links 7 SourcesCharacters and story[edit] Originally, Captain Easy
Captain Easy
was a supporting character in the series Wash Tubbs, which focused on the adventures of the zany Washington Tubbs II. On February 26, 1929, Crane introduced taciturn toughguy Captain Easy, who soon took over the strip. On July 30, 1933, Crane launched Captain Easy, Soldier of Fortune as a Sunday page starring Easy. Captain Easy
Captain Easy
was a chivalrous Southern adventurer in the classic adventure-hero mold. After a series of globe-trotting adventures, Easy enlisted in the
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R. C. Harvey
Robert C. Harvey (born 1937),[1] popularly known as R. C. Harvey, is an author, critic and cartoonist. He has written a number of books on the history of the medium, with special focus on the history of the comic strip, and he has also worked as a freelance cartoonist.Contents1 Early life 2 Work 3 Personal life 4 References 5 External linksEarly life[edit] Harvey describes himself as having created cartoons since age 7.[2] He was educated at the University of Colorado, where he submitted cartoons to the campus humor magazine, The Flatiron.[2] Upon graduation, Harvey attempted to earn a living as a freelance cartoonist in New York, but was interrupted in his attempt by service in the U.S. Navy
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Big Little Books
The Big Little Books, first published during 1932 by the Whitman Publishing Company of Racine, Wisconsin, were small, compact books designed with a captioned illustration opposite each page of text. Other publishers, notably Saalfield, adopted this format after Whitman achieved success with its early titles, priced initially at 10¢ each (later 15¢).Contents1 Format 2 History 3 Mighty Midgets 4 References 5 Read 6 External linksFormat[edit] A Big Little Book was typically 3⅝″ wide and 4½″ high, with 212 to 432 pages making an approximate thickness of 1½″. The interior book design usually displayed full-page black-and-white illustrations on the right side, facing the pages of text on the left. Stories were often related to radio programs (The Shadow), comic strips (The Gumps), children's books (Uncle Wiggily), novels (John Carter of Mars) and movies (Bambi)
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Bhob Stewart
Stewart may refer to:Contents1 People1.1 Clans2 Places2.1 Canada 2.2 New Zealand 2.3 United Kingdom 2.4 United States2.4.1 Airports 2.4.2 Counties 2.4.3 Localities 2.4.4 Counties2.5 Other Places3 Brands and enterprises 4 Other uses 5 See alsoPeople[edit] Main article: Stewart (name) Clans[edit]Clan Stewart, a Scottish clan Clan Stewart
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Dave Strickler
Dave Strickler (born 1944) is a reference librarian noted for his compilation of Syndicated Comic Strips and Artists, 1924–1995: The Complete Index, regarded as a major reference work by researchers and historians of newspaper comic strips.Contents1 Biography 2 Work2.1 Compilation and indexing 2.2 Online comic strip database 2.3 Character index3 See also 4 References 5 Sources 6 External linksBiography[edit] Born in Iowa, Strickler holds degrees from the University of Florida, Georgetown University and Florida State University. Prior to earning a library degree in 1988, Strickler was involved in linguistics, hotel management, entertainment coordination at Walt Disney World and professional gambling
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World War II
Allied victoryCollapse of Nazi Germany Fall of Japanese and Italian Empires Dissolution of the League of Nations Creation of the United Nations Emergence of the United States
United States
and the Soviet Union
Soviet Union
as superpowers Beginning of the Cold War
Cold War
(more...)ParticipantsAllied Powers Axis PowersCommanders and leadersMain Allied leaders Joseph Stalin Franklin D
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Dell Comics
Dell Comics
Dell Comics
was the comic book publishing arm of Dell Publishing, which got its start in pulp magazines. It published comics from 1929 to 1974
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International Standard Book Number
"ISBN" redirects here. For other uses, see ISBN (other).International Standard Book
Book
NumberA 13-digit ISBN, 978-3-16-148410-0, as represented by an EAN-13 bar codeAcronym ISBNIntroduced 1970; 48 years ago (1970)Managing organisation International ISBN AgencyNo. of digits 13 (formerly 10)Check digit Weighted sumExample 978-3-16-148410-0Website www.isbn-international.orgThe International Standard Book
Book
Number (ISBN) is a unique[a][b] numeric commercial book identifier. Publishers purchase ISBNs from an affiliate of the International ISBN Agency.[1] An ISBN is assigned to each edition and variation (except reprintings) of a book. For example, an e-book, a paperback and a hardcover edition of the same book would each have a different ISBN. The ISBN is 13 digits long if assigned on or after 1 January 2007, and 10 digits long if assigned before 2007
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Don Markstein's Toonopedia
Don Markstein's Toonopedia
Don Markstein's Toonopedia
(subtitled A Vast Repository of Toonological Knowledge) is a web encyclopedia of print cartoons, comic strips and animation, initiated February 13, 2001. Donald D. Markstein, the sole writer and editor of Toonopedia, termed it "the world's first hypertext encyclopedia of toons" and stated, "The basic idea is to cover the entire spectrum of American cartoonery." Markstein began the project during 1999 with several earlier titles: He changed Don's Cartoon
Cartoon
Encyberpedia (1999) to Don Markstein's Cartoonopedia (2000) after learning the word "Encyberpedia" had been trademarked. During 2001, he settled on his final title, noting, "Decided (after thinking about it for several weeks) to change the name of the site to Don Markstein's Toonopedia, rather than Cartoonopedia
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Daily Strip
A daily strip is a newspaper comic strip format, appearing on weekdays, Monday through Saturday, as contrasted with a Sunday strip, which typically only appears on Sundays. Bud Fisher's Mutt and Jeff
Mutt and Jeff
is commonly regarded as the first daily comic strip, launched November 15, 1907 (under its initial title, A. Mutt) on the sports pages of the San Francisco Chronicle. The featured character had previously appeared in sports cartoons by Fisher but was unnamed. Fisher had approached his editor, John P. Young, about doing a regular strip as early as 1905 but was turned down. According to Fisher, Young told him, "It would take up too much room, and readers are used to reading down the page, and not horizontally."[1] Other cartoonists followed the trend set by Fisher, as noted by comic strip historian R. C
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Special
Special
Special
or specials may refer to:Contents1 Music 2 Film and television 3 Other uses 4 See alsoMusic[edit] Special
Special
(album), a 1992
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Bill Blackbeard
William Elsworth Blackbeard (April 28, 1926 – March 10, 2011), better known as Bill Blackbeard, was a writer-editor and the founder-director of the San Francisco Academy of Comic Art, a comprehensive collection of comic strips and cartoon art from American newspapers. This major collection, consisting of 2.5 million clippings, tearsheets and comic sections, spanning the years 1894 to 1996, has provided source material for numerous books and articles by Blackbeard and other researchers.[1]Contents1 Biography 2 Books 3 San Francisco Academy of Comic Art 4 Double Fold 5 Later life and death 6 Awards 7 See also 8 References 9 Sources 10 External linksBiography[edit] Born in Lawrence, Indiana, Blackbeard spent his childhood in this rural town northeast of Indianapolis. His grandfather ran a service station; his father, Sydney Blackbeard, was an electrician, and his mother, Thelma, handled the bookkeeping for Sydney's business
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Comic Strip
A comic strip is a sequence of drawings arranged in interrelated panels to display brief humor or form a narrative, often serialized, with text in balloons and captions. Traditionally, throughout the 20th century and into the 21st, these have been published in newspapers and magazines, with horizontal strips printed in black-and-white in daily newspapers, while Sunday newspapers offered longer sequences in special color comics sections. With the development of the internet, they began to appear online as webcomics. There were more than 200 different comic strips and daily cartoon panels in American newspapers alone each day for most of the 20th century, for a total of at least 7,300,000 episodes.[1] Strips are written and drawn by a comics artist or cartoonist
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Sunday Comics
The Sunday comics
Sunday comics
or Sunday strip
Sunday strip
is the comic strip section carried in most western newspapers, almost always in color. Many newspaper readers called this section the Sunday funnies, the funny papers or simply the funnies.[1] The first US newspaper comic strips appeared in the late 19th century, closely allied with the invention of the color press.[2] Jimmy Swinnerton's The Little Bears
The Little Bears
introduced sequential art and recurring characters in William Randolph Hearst's San Francisco Examiner. In America, the popularity of color comic strips sprang from the newspaper war between Hearst and Joseph Pulitzer
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Sunday Strip
The Sunday comics
Sunday comics
or Sunday strip
Sunday strip
is the comic strip section carried in most western newspapers, almost always in color. Many newspaper readers called this section the Sunday funnies, the funny papers or simply the funnies.[1] The first US newspaper comic strips appeared in the late 19th century, closely allied with the invention of the color press.[2] Jimmy Swinnerton's The Little Bears
The Little Bears
introduced sequential art and recurring characters in William Randolph Hearst's San Francisco Examiner. In America, the popularity of color comic strips sprang from the newspaper war between Hearst and Joseph Pulitzer
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