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Captain Cook
Captain James Cook
James Cook
FRS (7 November 1728[NB 1] – 14 February 1779) was a British explorer, navigator, cartographer, and captain in the Royal Navy. Cook made detailed maps of Newfoundland prior to making three voyages to the Pacific Ocean, during which he achieved the first recorded European contact with the eastern coastline of Australia
Australia
and the Hawaiian Islands, and the first recorded circumnavigation of New Zealand. Cook joined the British merchant navy as a teenager and joined the Royal Navy
Royal Navy
in 1755. He saw action in the Seven Years' War, and subsequently surveyed and mapped much of the entrance to the Saint Lawrence River during the siege of Quebec. This helped bring Cook to the attention of the Admiralty
Admiralty
and Royal Society
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Astronomy
Astronomy
Astronomy
(from Greek: ἀστρονομία) is a natural science that studies celestial objects and phenomena. It applies mathematics, physics, and chemistry, in an effort to explain the origin of those objects and phenomena and their evolution. Objects of interest include planets, moons, stars, galaxies, and comets; the phenomena include supernova explosions, gamma ray bursts, and cosmic microwave background radiation. More generally, all phenomena that originate outside Earth's atmosphere
Earth's atmosphere
are within the purview of astronomy. A related but distinct subject, physical cosmology, is concerned with the study of the Universe
Universe
as a whole.[1] Astronomy
Astronomy
is one of the oldest of the natural sciences
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Haberdasher
A haberdasher is a person who sells small articles for sewing, such as buttons, ribbons and zippers (in the United Kingdom[1]), or a men's outfitter (American English).[2] The sewing articles are called haberdashery, or "notions" (American English). Origin and use[edit]A haberdasher's shopThe word appears in Chaucer's Canterbury Tales.[3] Haberdashers were initially peddlers, thus sellers of small items such as needles and buttons
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Admiralty
The Admiralty, originally known as the Office of the Admiralty
Admiralty
and Marine Affairs,[1] was the government department[2][3] responsible for the command of the Royal Navy
Royal Navy
first in the Kingdom of England, second in the Kingdom of Great Britain, and from 1801 to 1964,[4] the United Kingdom and former British Empire
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HM Bark Endeavour
Endeavour or endeavor may refer to:Contents1 Arts, entertainment 2 Awards 3 Computing and technology 4 Education 5 Man-made structures 6 Media 7 Motor vehicles 8 Organizations 9 Places 10 Transport10.1 Ships 10.2 Space vehicles 10.3 Trains11 Other 12 See alsoArts, entertainment[edit]Endeavor, a strategy game from Z-Man Games Endeavors, a rock band from Montreal, Canada Endeavour Entertainment, a home media company responsible for releasing Thomas & Friends videos in New Zealand Endeavour Morse, central character of the Inspector Morse novels by Colin Dexter Endeavour (TV series), a television drama adapted from characters in Colin Dexter's novels Endeavour, a spacecraft from Rendezvous with Rama
Rendezvous with Rama
by Arthur C. Clarke Endeavour, an Alliance Strike carrier from Starlancer H.M.S
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Kalaniʻōpuʻu
Kalaniʻōpuʻu-a-Kaiamamao (c. 1729 – April 1782) was a Hawaiian monarch, the 6th Aliʻi (chief) of Kohala, 4th Aliʻi of the Kona district and 2nd Aliʻi of the Kaʻū district on the island of Hawaiʻi. He was called Terreeoboo, King of Owhyhee by James Cook and other Europeans. His name has also been written as Kaleiopuu. Biography[edit] He was born around 1729 as the son of Kalaninuiamamao and his wife Kamākaʻimoku
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Cutter (boat)
A cutter is typically a small, but in some cases a medium-sized, watercraft designed for speed rather than for capacity.[1][2] Traditionally a cutter sailing vessel is a small single-masted boat, fore-and-aft rigged, with two or more headsails and often a bowsprit. The cutter's mast may be set farther back than on a sloop.[3] In modern usage, a cutter can be either a small- or medium-sized vessel whose occupants exercise official authority. Examples are harbor pilots' cutters and cutters of the U.S. Coast Guard[4] or UK Border Force. Cutters can also be a small boat serving a larger one to ferry passengers or light stores between larger boats and the shore. This type of cutter may be powered by oars, sails or a motor.[clarification needed]Contents1 Sailing 2 Rowing 3 Pulling 4 Naval cutter 5 Pilot cutter 6 Customs services 7 See also 8 References 9 External linksSailing[edit]French cutterThe cutter is one of several types of sailboats
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Parish Church
A parish church (or parochial church) in Christianity
Christianity
is the church which acts as the religious centre of a parish. In many parts of the world, especially in rural areas, the parish church may play a significant role in community activities, often allowing its premises to be used for non-religious community events. The church building reflects this status, and there is considerable variety in the size and style of parish churches. Many villages in Europe
Europe
have churches that date back to the Middle Ages, but all periods of architecture are represented.Contents1 Role 2 By denomination 3 Protestant resurgence 4 See also 5 References 6 Further readingRole[edit] In England, it is the basic administrative unit of episcopal churches. Nearly every part of England
England
is in a parish, and most parishes have an Anglican parish church, which is consecrated
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Roxburghshire
Roxburghshire
Roxburghshire
or the County of Roxburgh
Roxburgh
is a historic county and registration county in the Southern Uplands
Southern Uplands
of Scotland. It borders Dumfriesshire
Dumfriesshire
to the west, Selkirkshire
Selkirkshire
to the north-west, and Berwickshire
Berwickshire
to the north. To the south-west it borders Cumberland
Cumberland
and to the south-east Northumberland, both in England. It was named after the Royal Burgh
Royal Burgh
of Roxburgh, a town which declined markedly in the 15th century and is no longer in existence
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Melbourne
Melbourne
Melbourne
(/ˈmɛlbərn/[8] locally [ˈmɛɫbn̩] ( listen))[9][10] is the state capital and most populous city of the Australian
Australian
state of Victoria, and the second-most populous city in Australia
Australia
and Oceania.[1] The name "Melbourne" covers an urban agglomeration spanning 9,992.5 km2 (3,858.1 sq mi),[2] which comprises the broader metropolitan area, as well as being the common name for its city centre
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Religious Society Of Friends
Quakers
Quakers
(or Friends) are members of a historically Christian group of religious movements formally known as the Religious Society of Friends or Friends Church.[2] Members of the various Quaker movements are all generally united in a belief in the ability of each human being to experientially access "the light within", or "that of God
God
in every person". Some may profess the priesthood of all believers, a doctrine derived from the First Epistle of Peter.[3][4][5][6] They include those with evangelical, holiness, liberal, and traditional Quaker understandings of Christianity. There are also Nontheist Quakers whose spiritual practice is not reliant on the existence of a Christian God
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Saint Lawrence River
The Saint Lawrence River
River
(French: Fleuve Saint-Laurent; Tuscarora: Kahnawáʼkye;[3] Mohawk: Kaniatarowanenneh, meaning "big waterway") is a large river in the middle latitudes of North America. The Saint Lawrence River
River
flows in a roughly north-easterly direction, connecting the Great Lakes
Great Lakes
with the Atlantic Ocean
Atlantic Ocean
and forming the primary drainage outflow of the Great Lakes
Great Lakes
Basin. It traverses the Canadian provinces of Quebec
Quebec
and Ontario, and is part of the international boundary between Ontario, Canada, and the U.S. state
U.S. state
of New York
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Captain Cook Memorial Museum
A memorial is an object which serves as a focus for memory of something, usually a person (who has died) or an event. Popular forms of memorials include landmark objects or art objects such as sculptures, statues or fountains, and even entire parks.Contents1 Types 2 Examples of notable memorials 3 See also 4 References 5 External linksTypes[edit] The most common type of memorial is the gravestone or the memorial plaque. Also common are war memorials commemorating those who have died in wars
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Collier (ship Type)
A collier is a bulk cargo ship designed to carry coal, especially for naval use by coal-fired warships. Coaling at sea was critical to navies and speed of coal transfer was an important metric of naval efficiency. In 1883, forty tons an hour was considered fast and it would take over twelve hours to restock half the bunkers of a typical ship, HMS Collingwood.[1]Contents1 Coals from Newcastle1.1 Loading and unloading2 Alternate uses 3 See also3.1 Vessels of similar function 3.2 Famous colliers3.2.1 Vessels of James Cook 3.2.2 Other famous colliers4 References 5 External linksCoals from Newcastle[edit] For many years, the Durham and Northumberland
Northumberland
coalfields supplied a rapidly expanding London
London
with vast tonnages of coal, and a large fleet of coastal colliers travelled up and down the east coast of England loaded with "black diamonds"
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Coastal Trading Vessel
Coastal trading vessels, also known as coasters, are shallow-hulled ships used for trade between locations on the same island or continent
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River Tyne
The River
River
Tyne /ˈtaɪn/ ( listen) is a river in North East England
England
and its length (excluding tributaries) is 73 miles (118 km).[1] It is formed by the confluence of two rivers: the North Tyne
North Tyne
and the South Tyne. These two rivers converge at Warden Rock near Hexham
Hexham
in Northumberland
Northumberland
at a place dubbed 'The Meeting of the Waters'. The North Tyne
North Tyne
rises on the Scottish border, north of Kielder Water. It flows through Kielder Forest, and in and out of the border. It then passes through the village of Bellingham before reaching Hexham. The South Tyne
South Tyne
rises on Alston Moor, Cumbria
Cumbria
and flows through the towns of Haltwhistle
Haltwhistle
and Haydon Bridge, in a valley often called the Tyne Gap
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