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Canovium
Canovium
Canovium
was a fort in the Roman province
Roman province
of Britannia. Its site is located at Caerhun
Caerhun
in the Conwy
Conwy
valley, in the county borough of Conwy, in North Wales.Contents1 Early history 2 Later history 3 Academic studies 4 See also 5 References 6 External linksEarly history[edit] Canovium
Canovium
was a square fort built in timber at an important river crossing (at Tal-y-Cafn) by the Roman army around AD 75, possibly to house a 500-strong regiment of foot-soldiers. Rebuilding in stone began in the early 2nd century. It contained the usual headquarters building, commanding officer's house, granaries and barrack blocks, but the two former buildings were unusually large for the size of the fort. There was a bath-house to the east and an extensive vicus to the north
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Milestone
A milestone is one of a series of numbered markers placed along a road or boundary at intervals of one mile or occasionally, parts of a mile. They are typically located at the side of the road or in a median or central reservation. They are alternatively known as mile markers, mileposts or mile posts (sometimes abbreviated MPs). Mileage is the distance along the road from a fixed commencement point. Commonly the term "milestone" may also refer to markers placed at other distances, such as every kilometre. Milestones are installed to provide reference points along the road. This can be used to reassure travellers that the proper path is being followed, and to indicate either distance travelled or the remaining distance to a destination. Such references are also used by maintenance engineers and emergency services to direct them to specific points where their presence is required. This term is sometimes used to denote a location on a road even if no physical sign is present
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Craig-y-Don
Craig-y-Don
Craig-y-Don
is a suburb of Llandudno, a coastal seaside resort in Conwy county borough, north Wales
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Parish Church
A parish church (or parochial church) in Christianity
Christianity
is the church which acts as the religious centre of a parish. In many parts of the world, especially in rural areas, the parish church may play a significant role in community activities, often allowing its premises to be used for non-religious community events. The church building reflects this status, and there is considerable variety in the size and style of parish churches. Many villages in Europe
Europe
have churches that date back to the Middle Ages, but all periods of architecture are represented.Contents1 Role 2 By denomination 3 Protestant resurgence 4 See also 5 References 6 Further readingRole[edit] In England, it is the basic administrative unit of episcopal churches. Nearly every part of England
England
is in a parish, and most parishes have an Anglican parish church, which is consecrated
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British Museum
5,906,716 (2017)[2]Ranked 1st nationallyChairman Sir Richard LambertDirector Hartwig FischerPublic transit access Goodge Street; Holborn; Tottenham Court Road; Russell Square;Website britishmuseum.orgArea 807,000 sq ft (75,000 m2) in 94 GalleriesThe centre of the museum was redeveloped in 2001 to become the Great Court, surrounding the original Reading Room.The British Museum, located in the Bloomsbury
Bloomsbury
area of London, United Kingdom, is a public institution dedicated to human history, art and culture
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Hadrian
Hadrian
Hadrian
(/ˈheɪdriən/; Latin: Publius Aelius Hadrianus Augustus; 24 January 76 – 10 July 138 AD) was Roman emperor
Roman emperor
from 117 to 138.[note 1] He was born Publius Aelius Hadrianus, probably at Italica, near Santiponce
Santiponce
(in modern-day Spain), into a Hispano-Roman family with centuries-old roots in Hispania. His father was a maternal first cousin of the emperor Trajan. Some years before Hadrian's accession, he married Trajan's grand-niece, Vibia Sabina. Trajan's wife and Empress, Pompeia Plotina, and his close friend and adviser Licinius Sura, were well disposed towards Hadrian
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Vicus (Rome)
In Ancient Rome, the vicus (plural vici) was a neighborhood or settlement. During the Republican era, the four regiones of the city of Rome were subdivided into vici. In the 1st century BC, Augustus reorganized the city for administrative purposes into 14 regions, comprising 265 vici.[1] Each vicus had its own board of officials who oversaw local matters. These administrative divisions are recorded as still in effect at least through the mid-4th century.[2][3] The Latin
Latin
word vicus was also applied to the smallest administrative unit of a provincial town within the Roman Empire, and to an ad hoc provincial civilian settlement that sprang up close to and because of a nearby official Roman site, usually a military garrison or state-owned mining operation.Contents1 Local government in Rome 2 Ad hoc settlements 3 Modern placenames 4 See also 5 ReferencesLocal government in Rome[edit] See also: 14 regions of Augustan RomeThis section needs expansion
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Roman Empire
Mediolanum
Mediolanum
(286–402, Western) Augusta Treverorum Sirmium Ravenna
Ravenna
(402–476, Western) Nicomedia
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North Wales
North Wales
Wales
(Welsh: Gogledd Cymru) is an unofficial region of Wales. Retail, transport and educational infrastructure are centred on Wrexham, Rhyl, Colwyn Bay, Llandudno
Llandudno
and Bangor
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County Borough
County
County
borough is a term introduced in 1889 in the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland
Ireland
(excluding Scotland), to refer to a borough or a city independent of county council control. They were abolished by the Local Government Act 1972
Local Government Act 1972
in England
England
and Wales, but continue in use for lieutenancy and shrievalty in Northern Ireland. In the Republic of Ireland
Ireland
they remain in existence but have been renamed cities under the provisions of the Local Government Act 2001.[1] The Local Government (Wales) Act 1994
Local Government (Wales) Act 1994
re-introduced the term for certain "principal areas" in Wales. Scotland
Scotland
did not have county boroughs but instead counties of cities. These were abolished on 16 May 1975
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Roman Province
In Ancient Rome, a province (Latin: provincia, pl. provinciae) was the basic, and, until the Tetrarchy
Tetrarchy
(293 AD), largest territorial and administrative unit of the empire's territorial possessions outside Italy. The word province in modern English has its origins in the term used by the Romans. Provinces were generally governed by politicians of senatorial rank, usually former consuls or former praetors. A later exception was the province of Egypt, incorporated by Augustus
Augustus
after the death of Cleopatra: it was ruled by a governor of equestrian rank only, perhaps as a discouragement to senatorial ambition
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Castra
In the Roman Empire, the Latin
Latin
word castrum[1] (plural castra) was a building, or plot of land, used as a fortified military camp. Castrum was the term used for different sizes of camps including a large legionary fortress, smaller auxiliary forts, temporary encampments, and "marching" forts. The diminutive form castellum was used for fortlets, typically occupied by a detachment of a cohort or a century.[2] In English, the terms Roman fortress, Roman fort, and Roman camp are commonly used for castrum
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Ordnance Survey National Grid
The Ordnance Survey
Ordnance Survey
National Grid reference
Grid reference
system is a system of geographic grid references used in Great Britain, distinct from latitude and longitude. It is often called British National Grid (BNG).[1][2] The Ordnance Survey
Ordnance Survey
(OS) devised the national grid reference system, and it is heavily used in their survey data, and in maps based on those surveys, whether published by the Ordnance Survey
Ordnance Survey
or by commercial map producers
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Geographic Coordinate System
A geographic coordinate system is a coordinate system used in geography that enables every location on Earth to be specified by a set of numbers, letters or symbols.[n 1] The coordinates are often chosen such that one of the numbers represents a vertical position, and two or three of the numbers represent a horizontal position
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Britannia
Britannia
Britannia
has been used in several different senses. The name is a Latinisation of the native Brittonic word for the island, Pretanī, which also produced the Greek form Prettanike or Brettaniai, which originally, in the fourth to the first centuries BC, designated a collection of islands with individual names, including Albion
Albion
or Britain. By the 1st century BC, Britannia
Britannia
came to be used for Great Britain specifically. After the Roman conquest in 43 AD, Britannia meant Roman Britain, a province covering the island south of Caledonia (roughly Scotland)
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Aberystwyth University
Aberystwyth
Aberystwyth
University (Welsh: Prifysgol Aberystwyth) is a public research university in Aberystwyth, Wales. Aberystwyth
Aberystwyth
was a founding member institution of the former federal University of Wales. The university has almost 8,000 students studying across its six academic institutes. Founded in 1872 as University College Wales, Aberystwyth, it became a founder member of the University of Wales
Wales
in 1894 and changed its name to the University College of Wales, Aberystwyth. In the mid-1990s, the university again changed its name to the University of Wales, Aberystwyth
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