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Cannabis Culture
Cannabis
Cannabis
culture describes a social atmosphere or series of associated social behaviors that depends heavily upon cannabis consumption, particularly as an entheogen, recreational drug and medicine
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Cannabinol
insoluble in water[1] soluble in methanol[2] and ethanol[3] mg/mL (20 °C)SMILESOc2cc(cc1OC(c3c(c12)cc(cc3)C)(C)C)CCCCCInChIInChI=1S/C21H26O2/c1-5-6-7-8-15-12-18(22)20-16-11-14(2)9-10-17(16)21(3,4)23-19(20)13-15/h9-13,22H,5-8H2,1-4H3 YKey:VBGLYOIFKLUMQG-UHFFFAOYSA-N Y NY (what is this?)  (verify) Cannabinol
Cannabinol
(CBN) is a non-psychoactive cannabinoid found only in trace amounts in Cannabis,[5] and is mostly found in aged Cannabis.[6] Pharmacologically relevant quantities are formed as a metabolite of tetrahydrocannabinol (THC)
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Tetrahydrocannabivarin
Tetrahydrocannabivarin
Tetrahydrocannabivarin
(THCV, THV) is a homologue of tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) having a propyl (3-carbon) side chain instead of a pentyl (5-carbon) group on the molecule, which makes it produce very different effects from THC.[1] This terpeno-phenolic compound is found naturally in Cannabis, sometimes in significant amounts. The psychoactive effects of THCV in Cannabis
Cannabis
preparations are not well characterized. At lower doses, THCV may act as a CB1 antagonist
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Cannabicyclol
Cannabicyclol
Cannabicyclol
(CBL) is a non-psychoactive cannabinoid found in Cannabis. CBL is a degradative product like cannabinol[citation needed]. Light converts cannabichromene into CBL[citation needed]. It has 16 stereoisomers
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Cannabidivarin
Cannabidivarin
Cannabidivarin
(CBDV) is a non-psychoactive cannabinoid found in Cannabis. It is a homolog of cannabidiol (CBD), with the side-chain shortened by two methylene bridges (CH2 units). Plants with relatively high levels of CBDV have been reported in feral populations of C. indica ( = C. sativa ssp. indica var. kafiristanica) from northwest India, and in hashish from Nepal.[1][2] CBDV has anticonvulsant effects.[3] Similarly to CBD, it has 7 double bond isomers and 30 stereoisomers (see: Cannabidiol#Double bond isomers and their stereoisomers). It is not scheduled by Convention on Psychotropic Substances
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Cannabigerol
Cannabigerol
Cannabigerol
(CBG) is a non-intoxicating cannabinoid found in the Cannabis
Cannabis
genus of plants, as well as certain other plants including Helichrysum
Helichrysum
umbraculigerum.[1] CBG is the non-acidic form of cannabigerolic acid (CBGA), the parent molecule (“mother cannabinoid”) from which many other cannabinoids are made
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Cannabivarin
Cannabivarin
Cannabivarin
(CBV), also known as cannabivarol, is a non-psychoactive cannabinoid found in minor amounts in the hemp plant Cannabis
Cannabis
sativa. It is an analog of cannabinol (CBN) with the side chain shortened by two methylene bridges (-CH2-). CBV is an oxidation product of tetrahydrocannabivarin (THCV, THV).[1]Contents1 Chemistry 2 Legal status2.1 United States3 References 4 See also 5 External linksChemistry[edit] It has no double bond isomers nor stereoisomers. Legal status[edit] It is not scheduled by Convention on Psychotropic Substances. United States[edit] CBV is not scheduled at the federal level in the United States,[2] but it could be considered an analog (of THC), in which case, sales or possession intended for human consumption could be prosecuted under the Federal Analog Act. References[edit]^ Keith Bailey, Denise Gagné (October 1975)
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N-Arachidonoyl Dopamine
Dopamine
Dopamine
(DA, a contraction of 3,4-dihydroxyphenethylamine) is an organic chemical of the catecholamine and phenethylamine families that plays several important roles in the brain and body. It is an amine synthesized by removing a carboxyl group from a molecule of its precursor chemical L-DOPA, which is synthesized in the brain and kidneys. Dopamine
Dopamine
is also synthesized in plants and most animals. In the brain, dopamine functions as a neurotransmitter—a chemical released by neurons (nerve cells) to send signals to other nerve cells. The brain includes several distinct dopamine pathways, one of which plays a major role in the motivational component of reward-motivated behavior. The anticipation of most types of rewards increase the level of dopamine in the brain,[2] and many addictive drugs increase dopamine neuronal activity
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Levonantradol
Levonantradol
Levonantradol
(CP 50,556-1) is a synthetic cannabinoid analog of dronabinol (Marinol) developed by Pfizer
Pfizer
in the 1980s. It is around 30x more potent than THC, and exhibits antiemetic and analgesic effects via activation of CB1 and CB2 cannabinoid receptors.[1] Levonantradol
Levonantradol
is not currently used in medicine as dronabinol or nabilone are felt to be more useful for most conditions, however it is widely used in research into the potential therapeutic applications of cannabinoids.[2][3][4]Contents1 Pharmacodynamics 2 Pharmacokinetics 3 Treatment 4 Side effects 5 Synthesis 6 See also 7 Notes 8 ReferencesPharmacodynamics[edit] Levonantradol
Levonantradol
is a full CB1 receptor agonist
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Virodhamine
Virodhamine
Virodhamine
(O-arachidonoyl ethanolamine; O-AEA) is an endocannabinoid and a nonclassic eicosanoid, derived from arachidonic acid. O-Arachidonoyl ethanolamine is arachidonic acid and ethanolamine joined by an ester linkage, the opposite of the amide linkage found in anandamide. Based on this opposite orientation, the molecule was named virodhamine from the Sanskrit
Sanskrit
word virodha, which means opposition. It acts as an antagonist of the CB1 receptor and agonist of the CB2 receptor. Concentrations of virodhamine in the human hippocampus are similar to those of anandamide, but they are 2- to 9-fold higher in peripheral tissues that express CB2. Virodhamine
Virodhamine
lowers body temperature in mice, demonstrating cannabinoid activity in vivo.[1] See also[edit]Anandamide OleamideReferences[edit]^ Porter AC, Sauer JM, Knierman MD, et al. (2002)
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JWH-133
JWH-133
JWH-133
is a potent selective CB2 receptor agonist with a Ki of 3.4nM and selectivity of around 200x for CB2 over CB1 receptors. It was discovered by and named after, John W. Huffman. JWH-133, alongside WIN 55,212-2
WIN 55,212-2
and HU-210, is responsible for preventing the inflammation caused by Amyloid beta
Amyloid beta
proteins involved in Alzheimer's Disease, in addition to preventing cognitive impairment and loss of neuronal markers[citation needed]
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Synthetic Cannabinoid
Synthetic cannabinoids
Synthetic cannabinoids
are a class of chemicals that bind to cannabinoid receptors in the body, but that are different from the natural cannabinoids in cannabis plants. They are often marketed as designer drugs or sold in products with claims that they give the effects of cannabis
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AM-2201
AM-2201
AM-2201
(1-(5-fluoropentyl)-3-(1-naphthoyl)indole) is a recreational designer drug that acts as a potent but nonselective full agonist for the cannabinoid receptor.[1] It is part of the AM series of cannabinoids discovered by Alexandros Makriyannis at Northeastern University.Contents1 Hazards 2 Pharmacology2.1 Pharmacokinetics3 Detection 4 See also 5 ReferencesHazards[edit] Convulsions
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CP 55,940
CP 55,940
CP 55,940
is a cannabinoid which mimics the effects of naturally occurring THC (one of the psychoactive compounds found in cannabis). CP 55,940
CP 55,940
was created by Pfizer
Pfizer
in 1974 but was never marketed
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Dimethylheptylpyran
Dimethylheptylpyran
Dimethylheptylpyran
(DMHP, 3-(1,2-dimethylheptyl)-Δ6a,10a-THC, 1,2-dimethylheptyl-Δ3THC, A-40824, EA-2233) is a synthetic analogue of THC, which was invented in 1949 during attempts to elucidate the structure of Δ9-THC, one of the active components of cannabis.[1] DMHP is a pale yellow, viscous oil which is insoluble in water, but dissolves in alcohol or non-polar solvents.Contents1 Effects 2 Investigation as non-lethal incapacitating agent 3 Isomerism 4 ReferencesEffects[edit] DMHP is similar in structure to THC, differing only in the position of one double bond, and the replacement of the 3-pentyl chain with a 3-(1,2-dimethylheptyl) chain.[2] It produces similar activity to THC, such as sedative effects, but is considerably more potent,[3] especially having much stronger analgesic and anticonvulsant effects than THC, although comparatively weaker psychological effects
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HU-210
HU-210
HU-210
is a synthetic cannabinoid that was first synthesized in 1988 from (1R,5S)-myrtenol[1] by a group led by Professor Raphael Mechoulam at the Hebrew University.[2][3][4] HU-210
HU-210
is 100 to 800 times more potent than natural THC
THC
from cannabis and has an extended duration of action.[5] HU-210
HU-210
is the (–)-1,1-dimethylheptyl analog of 11-hydroxy- Δ8- tetrahydrocannabinol; in some references it is called 1,1-dimethylheptyl- 11-hydroxytetrahydrocannabinol
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