HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

picture info

Cannabinol
insoluble in water[1] soluble in methanol[2] and ethanol[3] mg/mL (20 °C)SMILESOc2cc(cc1OC(c3c(c12)cc(cc3)C)(C)C)CCCCCInChIInChI=1S/C21H26O2/c1-5-6-7-8-15-12-18(22)20-16-11-14(2)9-10-17(16)21(3,4)23-19(20)13-15/h9-13,22H,5-8H2,1-4H3 YKey:VBGLYOIFKLUMQG-UHFFFAOYSA-N Y NY (what is this?)  (verify) Cannabinol
Cannabinol
(CBN) is a non-psychoactive cannabinoid found only in trace amounts in Cannabis,[5] and is mostly found in aged Cannabis.[6] Pharmacologically relevant quantities are formed as a metabolite of tetrahydrocannabinol (THC).[7] CBN acts as a partial agonist
[...More...]

"Cannabinol" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Sigma-Aldrich
Sigma-Aldrich
Sigma-Aldrich
Corporation is an American chemical, life science and biotechnology company owned by Merck KGaA. Created by the 1975 merger of Sigma Chemical
Chemical
Company and Aldrich Chemical
Chemical
Company, Sigma-Aldrich
Sigma-Aldrich
since grew through various acquisitions until it had over 9,600 employees and was listed on the Fortune 1000
Fortune 1000
at the time of its acquisition by Merck. The company is headquartered in St. Louis
St. Louis
and has operations in approximately 40 countries.[4] In September 2014, the German company Merck KGaA
Merck KGaA
announced that it would be acquiring Sigma-Aldrich
Sigma-Aldrich
for $17 billion USD.[5] The acquisition was completed in November 2015 and Sigma-Aldrich
Sigma-Aldrich
became a subsidiary of Merck KGaA
[...More...]

"Sigma-Aldrich" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Stereoisomer
In stereochemistry, stereoisomers are isomeric molecules that have the same molecular formula and sequence of bonded atoms (constitution), but differ in the three-dimensional orientations of their atoms in space.[1][2] This contrasts with structural isomers, which share the same molecular formula, but the bond connections or their order differs. By definition, molecules that are stereoisomers of each other represent the same structural isomer.Contents1 Enantiomers 2 Diastereomers2.1 Cis–trans and E-Z isomerism3 Conformers 4 Anomers 5 Atropisomers 6 More definitions 7 Le Bel-van't Hoff rule 8 ReferencesEnantiomers[edit] Main articles: Chirality (chemistry)
Chirality (chemistry)
and Enantiomer Enantiomers, also known as optical isomers, are two stereoisomers that are related to each other by a reflection: they are mirror images of each other that are non-superimposable. Human hands are a macroscopic analog of this
[...More...]

"Stereoisomer" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Metabolite
A metabolite is the intermediate end product of metabolism. The term metabolite is usually restricted to small molecules. Metabolites have various functions, including fuel, structure, signaling, stimulatory and inhibitory effects on enzymes, catalytic activity of their own (usually as a cofactor to an enzyme), defense, and interactions with other organisms (e.g. pigments, odorants, and pheromones). A primary metabolite is directly involved in normal "growth", development, and reproduction. Ethylene
Ethylene
is an example of a primary metabolite produced in large-scale by industrial microbiology. A secondary metabolite is not directly involved in those processes, but usually has an important ecological function. Examples include antibiotics and pigments such as resins and terpenes etc. Some antibiotics use primary metabolites as precursors, such as actinomycin which is created from the primary metabolite, tryptophan
[...More...]

"Metabolite" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

International Standard Book Number
"ISBN" redirects here. For other uses, see ISBN (other).International Standard Book
Book
NumberA 13-digit ISBN, 978-3-16-148410-0, as represented by an EAN-13 bar codeAcronym ISBNIntroduced 1970; 48 years ago (1970)Managing organisation International ISBN AgencyNo. of digits 13 (formerly 10)Check digit Weighted sumExample 978-3-16-148410-0Website www.isbn-international.orgThe International Standard Book
Book
Number (ISBN) is a unique[a][b] numeric commercial book identifier. Publishers purchase ISBNs from an affiliate of the International ISBN Agency.[1] An ISBN is assigned to each edition and variation (except reprintings) of a book. For example, an e-book, a paperback and a hardcover edition of the same book would each have a different ISBN. The ISBN is 13 digits long if assigned on or after 1 January 2007, and 10 digits long if assigned before 2007
[...More...]

"International Standard Book Number" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Agonist
An agonist is a chemical that binds to a receptor and activates the receptor to produce a biological response. Whereas an agonist causes an action, an antagonist blocks the action of the agonist, and an inverse agonist causes an action opposite to that of the agonist.Contents1 Types of agonists 2 Activity2.1 Potency 2.2 Therapeutic index3 Etymology 4 See also 5 ReferencesTypes of agonists[edit] Receptors can be activated by either endogenous agonists (such as hormones and neurotransmitters) or exogenous agonists (such as drugs), resulting in a biological response. A physiological agonist is a substance that creates the same bodily responses but does not bind to the same receptor.An endogenous agonist for a particular receptor is a compound naturally produced by the body that binds to and activates that receptor
[...More...]

"Agonist" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Receptor (biochemistry)
In biochemistry and pharmacology, a receptor is a protein molecule that receives chemical signals from outside a cell.[1] When such chemical signals bind to a receptor, they cause some form of cellular/tissue response, e.g. a change in the electrical activity of a cell. There are three main ways the action of the receptor can be classified: relay of signal, amplification, or integration.[2] Relaying sends the signal onward, amplification increases the effect of a single ligand, and integration allows the signal to be incorporated into another biochemical pathway.[2] In this sense, a receptor is a protein-molecule that recognizes and responds to endogenous chemical signals, e.g. an acetylcholine receptor recognizes and responds to its endogenous ligand, acetylcholine. However, sometimes in pharmacology, the term is also used to include other proteins that are drug targets, such as enzymes, transporters, and ion channels. Receptor proteins can be classified by their location
[...More...]

"Receptor (biochemistry)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Affinity (pharmacology)
In biochemistry and pharmacology, a ligand is a substance that forms a complex with a biomolecule to serve a biological purpose. In protein-ligand binding, the ligand is usually a molecule which produces a signal by binding to a site on a target protein. The binding typically results in a change of conformation of the target protein. In DNA-ligand binding studies, the ligand can be a small molecule, ion,[1] or protein[2] which binds to the DNA double helix. The relationship between ligand and binding partner is a function of charge, hydrophobicity, and molecular structure. The instance of binding occurs over an infinitesimal range of time and space, so the rate constant is usually a very small number. Binding occurs by intermolecular forces, such as ionic bonds, hydrogen bonds and Van der Waals forces. The association of docking is actually reversible through dissociation. Measurably irreversible covalent bonding between a ligand and target molecule is atypical in biological systems
[...More...]

"Affinity (pharmacology)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Decarboxylation
Decarboxylation
Decarboxylation
is a chemical reaction that removes a carboxyl group and releases carbon dioxide (CO2). Usually, decarboxylation refers to a reaction of carboxylic acids, removing a carbon atom from a carbon chain. The reverse process, which is the first chemical step in photosynthesis, is called carboxylation, the addition of CO2 to a compound. Enzymes that catalyze decarboxylations are called decarboxylases or, the more formal term, carboxy-lyases (EC number 4.1.1).Contents1 In organic chemistry1.1 Hydrodecarboxylation2 In biochemistry 3 Case studies 4 ReferencesIn organic chemistry[edit] The term "decarboxylation" literally means removal of a carboxyl group (-COOH) and its replacement with a hydrogen atom. The term relates the state of the reactant and product
[...More...]

"Decarboxylation" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Cis–trans Isomerism
Cis–trans isomerism, also known as geometric isomerism or configurational isomerism, is a term used in organic chemistry. The prefixes "cis" and "trans" are from Latin. In the context of chemistry, cis indicates that the functional groups are on the same side of the carbon chain[1] while trans conveys that functional groups are on opposing sides of the carbon chain. Cis-trans isomers are stereoisomers, that is, pairs of molecules which have the same formula but whose functional groups are rotated into a different orientation in three-dimensional space. It is not to be confused with E–Z isomerism, which is an absolute stereochemical description, and only to be used with alkenes. In general, stereoisomers contain double bonds that do not rotate, or they may contain ring structures, where the rotation of bonds is restricted or prevented.[2] Cis and trans isomers occur both in organic molecules and in inorganic coordination complexes
[...More...]

"Cis–trans Isomerism" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

United Nations
The United Nations
United Nations
(UN) is an intergovernmental organization tasked to promote international cooperation and to create and maintain international order. A replacement for the ineffective League of Nations, the organization was established on 24 October 1945 after World War II
World War II
with the aim of preventing another such conflict. At its founding, the UN had 51 member states; there are now 193. The headquarters of the UN is in Manhattan, New York City, and is subject to extraterritoriality. Further main offices are situated in Geneva, Nairobi, and Vienna. The organization is financed by assessed and voluntary contributions from its member states. Its objectives include maintaining international peace and security, promoting human rights, fostering social and economic development, protecting the environment, and providing humanitarian aid in cases of famine, natural disaster, and armed conflict
[...More...]

"United Nations" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Trace Element
A trace element is a chemical element whose concentration (or other measure of amount) is very low (a "trace amount"). The exact definition depends on the field of science:In analytical chemistry, a trace element is one whose average concentration is less than 100 parts per million (ppm) measured in atomic count or less than 100 micrograms per gram. In biochemistry, a trace element is a dietary element that is needed in very minute quantities for the proper growth, development, and physiology of the organism.[1] Some examples of trace elements within the human body are cobalt, copper, fluorine, iodine, iron, manganese and zinc.[2] In geochemistry, a trace element is one whose concentration is less than 1000 ppm or 0.1 % of a rock's composition. The term is used mainly in igneous petrology. Trace elements will be either compatible with a liquid or solid phase
[...More...]

"Trace Element" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Single Convention On Narcotic Drugs
The Single Convention on Narcotic
Narcotic
Drugs of 1961 is an international treaty to prohibit production and supply of specific (nominally narcotic) drugs and of drugs with similar effects except under licence for specific purposes, such as medical treatment and research. As noted below, its major effects included updating the Paris Convention of 13 July 1931 to include the vast number of synthetic opioids invented in the intervening thirty years and a mechanism for more easily including new ones. From 1931 to 1961, most of the families of synthetic opioids had been developed, including drugs related to methadone, pethidine, morphinans and dextromoramide; research on fentanyls and piritramide was also nearing fruition at that point. Earlier treaties had only controlled opium, coca, and derivatives such as morphine, heroin and cocaine
[...More...]

"Single Convention On Narcotic Drugs" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Convention On Psychotropic Substances
The Convention on Psychotropic Substances
Convention on Psychotropic Substances
of 1971 is a United Nations treaty designed to control psychoactive drugs such as amphetamine-type stimulants, barbiturates, benzodiazepines, and psychedelics signed in Vienna, Austria
Austria
on 21 February 1971. The Single Convention on Narcotic Drugs of 1961 did not ban the many newly discovered psychotropics,[1] since its scope was limited to drugs with cannabis, coca, and opium-like effects. During the 1960s such drugs became widely available, and government authorities opposed this for numerous reasons, arguing that along with negative health effects, drug use led to lowered moral standards. The Convention, which contains import and export restrictions and other rules aimed at limiting drug use to scientific and medical purposes, came into force on 16 August 1976. As of 2013, 183 member states are Parties to the treaty
[...More...]

"Convention On Psychotropic Substances" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Misuse Of Drugs Act 1971
The Misuse of Drugs Act 1971
Misuse of Drugs Act 1971
is an Act of the Parliament of the United Kingdom. It represents action in line with treaty commitments under the Single Convention on Narcotic Drugs,[2] the Convention on Psychotropic Substances,[3] and the United Nations
United Nations
Convention Against Illicit Traffic in Narcotic Drugs and Psychotropic Substances.[4] Offences under the Act include:[5]Possession of a controlled drug unlawfully Possession of a controlled drug with intent to supply it Supplying or offering to supply a controlled drug (even where no charge is made for the drug) Allowing premises you occupy or manage to be used unlawfully for the purpose of producing or supplying controlled drugsIt is often presented[by whom?] as little more than a list of prohibited drugs and of penalties linked to their possession and supply
[...More...]

"Misuse Of Drugs Act 1971" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Transdermal Patch
A transdermal patch is a medicated adhesive patch that is placed on the skin to deliver a specific dose of medication through the skin and into the bloodstream. Often, this promotes healing to an injured area of the body. An advantage of a transdermal drug delivery route over other types of medication delivery such as oral, topical, intravenous, intramuscular, etc. is that the patch provides a controlled release of the medication into the patient, usually through either a porous membrane covering a reservoir of medication or through body heat melting thin layers of medication embedded in the adhesive. The main disadvantage to transdermal delivery systems stems from the fact that the skin is a very effective barrier; as a result, only medications whose molecules are small enough to penetrate the skin can be delivered by this method. A wide variety of pharmaceuticals are now available in transdermal patch form. The first commercially available prescription patch was approved by the U.S
[...More...]

"Transdermal Patch" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
.