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Camellia Japonica
Camellia
Camellia
japonica, known as common camellia[1] or Japanese camellia, is one of the best known species of the genus Camellia. Sometimes called the Rose of winter,[2] it belongs to the Theaceae
Theaceae
family. It is the official state flower of Alabama. There are thousands of cultivars of C. japonica in cultivation, with many different colors and forms of flowers. In the wild, it is found in mainland China (Shandong, east Zhejiang), Taiwan, southern Korea and southern Japan.[3] It grows in forests, at altitudes of around 300–1,100 metres (980–3,610 ft).[4]Contents1 Description 2 Taxonomy2.1 Camellia
Camellia
japonica var. japonica 2.2 Camellia
Camellia
japonica var
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Taxonomy (biology)
In biology, taxonomy (from Ancient Greek τάξις (taxis), meaning 'arrangement', and -νομία (-nomia), meaning 'method') is the science of defining and naming groups of biological organisms on the basis of shared characteristics. Organisms are grouped together into taxa (singular: taxon) and these groups are given a taxonomic rank; groups of a given rank can be aggregated to form a super-group of higher rank, thus creating a taxonomic hierarchy. The principal ranks in modern use are domain, kingdom, phylum (division is sometimes used in botany in place of phylum), class, order, family, genus, and species
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Glabrous
Glabrousness
Glabrousness
(from the Latin
Latin
glaber meaning "bald", "hairless", "shaved", "smooth") is the technical term for a lack of hair, down, setae, trichomes or other such covering. A glabrous surface may be a natural characteristic of all or part of a plant or animal, or be due to loss because of a physical condition, such as alopecia universalis in humans, which causes hair to fall out or not regrow
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Fruit
In botany, a fruit is the seed-bearing structure in flowering plants (also known as angiosperms) formed from the ovary after flowering. Fruits are the means by which angiosperms disseminate seeds. Edible fruits, in particular, have propagated with the movements of humans and animals in a symbiotic relationship as a means for seed dispersal and nutrition; in fact, humans and many animals have become dependent on fruits as a source of food.[1] Accordingly, fruits account for a substantial fraction of the world's agricultural output, and some (such as the apple and the pomegranate) have acquired extensive cultural and symbolic meanings. In common language usage, "fruit" normally means the fleshy seed-associated structures of a plant that are sweet or sour, and edible in the raw state, such as apples, bananas, grapes, lemons, oranges, and strawberries
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Locule
A locule (plural locules) or loculus (plural loculi) (meaning "little place" in Latin) is a small cavity[1] or compartment within an organ or part of an organism (animal, plant, or fungus). In angiosperms (flowering plants), the term locule usually refers to a chamber within an ovary (gynoecium or carpel) of the flower and fruits. Depending on the number of locules in the ovary, fruits can be classified as uni-locular (unilocular), bi-locular, tri-locular or multi-locular. The number of locules present in a gynoecium may be equal to or less than the number of carpels. The locules contain the ovules or seeds. The term may also refer to chambers within anthers containing pollen.[2] In Ascomycete
Ascomycete
fungi, locules are chambers within the hymenium in which the perithecia develop.[3] References[edit]^ "Loculus". Oxford Dictionaries.  ^ Hickey, M.; King, C. (2001). The Cambridge Illustrated Glossary of Botanical Terms
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Seed
A seed is an embryonic plant enclosed in a protective outer covering. The formation of the seed is part of the process of reproduction in seed plants, the spermatophytes, including the gymnosperm and angiosperm plants. Seeds are the product of the ripened ovule, after fertilization by pollen and some growth within the mother plant. The embryo is developed from the zygote and the seed coat from the integuments of the ovule. Seeds have been an important development in the reproduction and success of gymnosperm and angiosperm plants, relative to more primitive plants such as ferns, mosses and liverworts, which do not have seeds and use water-dependent means to propagate themselves. Seed plants now dominate biological niches on land, from forests to grasslands both in hot and cold climates. The term "seed" also has a general meaning that antedates the above—anything that can be sown, e.g. "seed" potatoes, "seeds" of corn or sunflower "seeds"
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Caterpillar
Caterpillars /ˈkætərˌpɪlər/ are the larval stage of members of the order Lepidoptera
Lepidoptera
(the insect order comprising butterflies and moths). As with most common names, the application of the word is arbitrary and the larvae of sawflies commonly are called caterpillars as well.[1][2] Both lepidopteran and symphytan larvae have eruciform body shapes. Caterpillars of most species are herbivorous, but not all; some (about 1%) are insectivorous, even cannibalistic. Some feed on other animal products; for example clothes moths feed on wool, and horn moths feed on the hooves and horns of dead ungulates. Caterpillars as a rule are voracious feeders and many of them are among the most serious of agricultural pests. In fact many moth species are best known in their caterpillar stages because of the damage they cause to fruits and other agricultural produce, whereas the moths are obscure and do no direct harm
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Lepidoptera
Aglossata Glossata Heterobathmiina Zeugloptera Lepidoptera
Lepidoptera
(/ˌlɛpɪˈdɒptərə/ lep-i-DOP-tər-ə) is an order of insects that includes butterflies and moths (both are called lepidopterans). About 180,000 species of the Lepidoptera
Lepidoptera
are described, in 126 families[1] and 46 superfamilies,[2] 10% of the total described species of living organisms.[2][3] It is one of the most widespread and widely recognizable insect orders in the world.[4] The Lepidoptera
Lepidoptera
show many variations of the basic body structure that have evolved to gain advantages in lifestyle and distribution
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Zosterops Japonica
The Japanese white-eye
Japanese white-eye
( Zosterops
Zosterops
japonicus), also known as the mejiro (メジロ, 目白), is a small passerine bird in the white-eye family. The specific epithet is occasionally written japonica, but this is incorrect due to the gender of the genus. Its native range includes much of east Asia, including Japan, Korea, China, Vietnam, Taiwan, and the Philippines. It has been intentionally introduced to other parts of the world as a pet and as pest control, with mixed results
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Georg Joseph Kamel
Georg Joseph Kamel (German: [ˈkaːməl]; Latin: Georgius Josephus Camellus; Czech: Jiří Josef Kamel, Spanish: Jorge Camel; 21 April 1661 – 2 May 1706) was a Jesuit missionary, pharmacist and naturalist known for producing the first comprehensive accounts of Philippine flora and fauna and for introducing Philippine nature to the European learned world.[1] A number of Kamel's treatises were published in the Philosophical Transactions, while his descriptions of Philippine flora appeared as an appendix to the third volume of John Ray's Historia Plantarum.Contents1 Plants named after Kamel 2 Life2.1 Kingdom of Bohemia 2.2 Philippines3 Work3.1 Overview of some of his works4 See also 5 References 6 Literature 7 External linksPlants named after Kamel[edi
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Engelbert Kaempfer
Engelbert Kaempfer
Engelbert Kaempfer
(German Engelbert Kämpfer, Latin Engelbertus Kaempferus; September 16, 1651 – November 2, 1716) was a German naturalist, physician, and explorer writer known for his tour of Russia, Persia, India, South-East Asia, and Japan
Japan
between 1683 and 1693. He wrote two books about his travels. Amoenitatum exoticarum, published in 1712, is important for its medical observations and the first extensive description of Japanese plants (Flora Japonica). His History of Japan, published posthumously in 1727, was the chief source of Western knowledge about the country throughout the 18th and mid-19th centuries when it was closed to foreigners.Contents1 Early life 2 Travels2.1 Persia 2.2 Siam
Siam
and Japan 2.3 Return to Europe3 Manuscripts 4 Kaempfer's Works 5 Literature on E
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Flora Of China
The flora of China
China
is diverse. More than 30,000 plant species are native to China, representing nearly one-eighth of the world's total plant species, including thousands found nowhere else on Earth. China
China
contains a variety of forest types. Both northeast and northwest reaches contain mountains and cold coniferous forests, supporting animal species which include moose and Asiatic black bear, along with some 120 types of birds. Moist conifer forests can have thickets of bamboo as an understorey, replaced by rhododendrons in higher montane stands of juniper and yew
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Zhoushan
 Zhoushan (help·info), formerly romanized as Chusan, is a prefecture-level "city"[b] in northeastern Zhejiang
Zhejiang
Province in eastern China. It consists of an archipelago of islands at the southern mouth of Hangzhou
Hangzhou
Bay, off Ningbo. The prefecture's city proper is Dinghai on Zhoushan
Zhoushan
Island, now administered as the prefecture's Dinghai District
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Plant
Plants are mainly multicellular, predominantly photosynthetic eukaryotes of the kingdom Plantae. Historically, plants were treated as one of two kingdoms including all living things that were not animals, and all algae and fungi were treated as plants. However, all current definitions of Plantae exclude the fungi and some algae, as well as the prokaryotes (the archaea and bacteria). By one definition, plants form the clade Viridiplantae
Viridiplantae
(Latin name for "green plants"), a group that includes the flowering plants, conifers and other gymnosperms, ferns and their allies, hornworts, liverworts, mosses and the green algae, but excludes the red and brown algae. Green plants obtain most of their energy from sunlight via photosynthesis by primary chloroplasts that are derived from endosymbiosis with cyanobacteria. Their chloroplasts contain chlorophylls a and b, which gives them their green color
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Honshu
Honshu
Honshu
(Japanese: 本州, translit. Honshū, lit. '"Main island/Main province', pronounced [hoꜜɴɕɯː] ( listen)) is the largest and most populous island of Japan,[1] located south of Hokkaido
Hokkaido
across the Tsugaru Strait, north of Shikoku
Shikoku
across the Inland Sea, and northeast of Kyushu
Kyushu
across the Kanmon Straits. The island separates the Sea of Japan, which lies to its north and west, from the North Pacific Ocean to its south and east
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Sea Of Japan
The Sea of Japan
Japan
(see below for other names) is a marginal sea between the Japanese archipelago, Sakhalin, the Korean Peninsula
Korean Peninsula
and Russia. The Japanese archipelago
Japanese archipelago
separates the sea from the Pacific Ocean. It is bordered by Japan, Korea
Korea
(North and South) and Russia. Like the Mediterranean Sea, it has almost no tides due to its nearly complete enclosure from the Pacific Ocean.[1] This isolation also reflects in the fauna species and in the water salinity, which is lower than in the ocean. The sea has no large islands, bays or capes. Its water balance is mostly determined by the inflow and outflow through the straits connecting it to the neighboring seas and Pacific Ocean
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