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Calvinism
Calvinism
Calvinism
(also called the Reformed tradition, Reformed Christianity, Reformed Protestantism, or the Reformed faith) is a major branch of Protestantism
Protestantism
that follows the theological tradition and forms of Christian practice of John Calvin
John Calvin
and other Reformation-era theologians. Calvinists broke from the Roman Catholic Church
Catholic Church
in the 16th century. Calvinists differ from Lutherans on the real presence of Christ
Christ
in the Eucharist, theories of worship, and the use of God's law for believers, among other things.[1][2] As declared in the Westminster and Second Helvetic confessions, the core doctrines are predestination and election
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Low Church
The term "low church" refers to churches which give relatively little emphasis to ritual, sacraments and the authority of clergy. The term is most often used in a liturgical context. The term was initially designed to be pejorative. During the series of doctrinal and ecclesiastic challenges to the established church in the 17th century, commentators and others — who favoured the theology, worship, and hierarchical structure of Anglicanism
Anglicanism
(such as the episcopate) as the true form of Christianity
Christianity
— began referring to that outlook (and the related practices) as "high church"
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Presbyterianism In South Korea
In South Korea, there are roughly 20.5 million Christians of whom 15 million are Protestants; of those some 9 to 10 million are Presbyterians. Presbyterians in South Korea
South Korea
worship in over 100 different Presbyterian denominational churches who trace their history back to the United Presbyterian Assembly.[1]Contents1 History 2 Confessional basis 3 Korean Presbyterian denominations 4 See also 5 ReferencesHistory[edit] Protestantism was introduced to Korea in the late 19th century through missionaries. Lay people like Suh Sang-Yoon and Baek Hong-Joon spread their knowledge of the Gospels
Gospels
after their conversion, and Christianity, of which the Catholic form had been suppressed in the middle of the 19th century, began to grow again in Korea. In 1883, Suh founded the first Protestant
Protestant
Christian
Christian
community in Korea
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Heinrich Bullinger
Heinrich Bullinger
Heinrich Bullinger
(18 July 1504 – 17 September 1575) was a Swiss reformer, the successor of Huldrych Zwingli
Huldrych Zwingli
as head of the Zurich church and pastor at Grossmünster. A much less controversial figure than John Calvin
John Calvin
or Martin Luther, his importance has long been underestimated; recent research shows that he was one of the most influential theologians of the Protestant Reformation
Protestant Reformation
in the 16th century.[citation needed]Contents1 Early life 2 Studies 3 Kappel ministry begins (1523–1528) 4 Bremgarten Ministry (1529–1531) 5 Second Helvetic Confession5.1 Marian views6 Works6.1 Theological works 6.2 Historical 6.3 Letters7 References 8 External linksEarly life[edit]This section needs additional citations for verification
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William Farel
William Farel
William Farel
(1489 – 13 September 1565), Guilhem Farel or Guillaume Farel (French: [gijom faʁɛl]), was a French evangelist, and a founder of the Reformed
Reformed
Church in the cantons of Neuchâtel, Berne, Geneva, and Vaud in Switzerland. He is most often remembered for having persuaded John Calvin
John Calvin
to remain in Geneva
Geneva
in 1536,[1] and for persuading him to return there in 1541,[2] after their expulsion in 1538
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Martin Bucer
Martin Bucer
Martin Bucer
(early German: Martin Butzer[1][2][a]; 11 November 1491 – 28 February 1551) was a German Protestant
Protestant
reformer based in Strasbourg
Strasbourg
who influenced Lutheran, Calvinist, and Anglican doctrines and practices. Bucer was originally a member of the Dominican Order, but after meeting and being influenced by Martin Luther in 1518 he arranged for his monastic vows to be annulled. He then began to work for the Reformation, with the support of Franz von Sickingen. Bucer's efforts to reform the church in Wissembourg
Wissembourg
resulted in his excommunication from the Roman Catholic
Catholic
Church, and he was forced to flee to Strasbourg. There he joined a team of reformers which included Matthew Zell, Wolfgang Capito, and Caspar Hedio
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Belgic Confession
The Confession of Faith, popularly known as the Belgic Confession, is a doctrinal standard document to which many of the Reformed churches subscribe. The Confession forms part of the Three Forms of Unity
Three Forms of Unity
of the Reformed Church,[1] which are still the official subordinate standards of the Dutch Reformed Church.[2][3] The confession's chief author was Guido de Brès, a preacher of the Reformed churches
Reformed churches
of the Netherlands, who died a martyr to the faith in 1567.[4]Contents1 Terminology 2 Authorship and revisions 3 Composition 4 Editions and translations 5 Notes 6 ReferencesTerminology[edit] The name Belgic Confession
Belgic Confession
follows the seventeenth-century Latin designation Confessio Belgica
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Reform (other)
Reform
Reform
is beneficial change. Reform
Reform
may also refer to: Reform
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International Conference Of Reformed Churches
The International Conference of Reformed Churches
International Conference of Reformed Churches
(ICRC) is a federation of Reformed or Calvinist churches across the world
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Charles Hodge
Charles Hodge
Charles Hodge
(December 27, 1797 – June 19, 1878) was a Presbyterian theologian and principal of Princeton Theological Seminary
Princeton Theological Seminary
between 1851 and 1878. He was a leading exponent of the Princeton Theology, an orthodox Calvinist
Calvinist
theological tradition in America during the 19th century
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World Reformed Fellowship
The World Reformed
Reformed
Fellowship (WRF) is an ecumenical Christian organization which promotes unity between conservative Reformed churches around the world.[1]Contents1 History 2 Denominational members 3 References 4 External linksHistory[edit] The World Fellowship of Reformed Churches (WFRC) was formed in 1994 by the Presbyterian Church in America, the National Presbyterian Church in Mexico, and the Presbyterian Church of Brazil, as well a
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Second Helvetic Confession
The Helvetic Confessions are two documents expressing the common belief of the Reformed
Reformed
churches of Switzerland. The First Helvetic Confession (Latin: Confessio Helvetica prior), known also as the Second Confession of Basel, was drawn up in Basel
Basel
in 1536 by Heinrich Bullinger
Heinrich Bullinger
and Leo Jud of Zürich, Kaspar Megander (de) of Bern, Oswald Myconius
Oswald Myconius
and Simon Grynaeus of Basel, Martin Bucer
Martin Bucer
and Wolfgang Capito
Wolfgang Capito
of Strasbourg, with other representatives from Schaffhausen, St Gall, Mülhausen
Mülhausen
and Biel. The first draft was written in Latin
Latin
and the Zürich
Zürich
delegates objected to its Lutheran phraseology
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North American Presbyterian And Reformed Council
The North American Presbyterian
Presbyterian
and Reformed
Reformed
Council (NAPARC) is an association of several Presbyterian
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Francis Turretin
Francis Turretin
Francis Turretin
(17 October 1623 – 28 September 1687; also known as François Turretini and Francis Turrettin) was a Genevan-Italian Reformed scholastic
Reformed scholastic
theologian. Turretin is especially known as a zealous opponent of the theology of the Academy of Saumur (embodied by Moise Amyraut
Moise Amyraut
and called Amyraldianism), as an earnest defender of the Calvinistic orthodoxy represented by the Synod of Dort, and as one of the authors of the Helvetic Consensus, which defended the formulation of predestination from the Synod of Dort
Synod of Dort
and the verbal inspiration of the Bible.Contents1 Life 2 Works 3 Free Choice 4 English translations 5 Notes 6 Bibliography 7 External linksLife[edit] He was the grandson of Francesco Turrettini, who left his native Lucca in 1574 and settled in Geneva in 1592
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First Helvetic Confession
A confession is a statement – made by a person or by a group of persons – acknowledging some personal fact that the person (or the group) would ostensibly prefer to keep hidden. The term presumes that the speaker is providing information that he believes the other party is not already aware of,[1] and is frequently associated with an admission of a moral or legal wrong:In one sense it is the acknowledgment of having done something wrong, whether on purpose or not. Thus confessional texts usually provide information of a private nature previously unavailable. What a sinner tells a priest in the confessional, the documents criminals sign acknowledging what they have done, an autobiography in which the author acknowledges mistakes, and so on, are all examples of confessional texts.[2]Not all confessions reveal wrongdoing, however
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Savoy Declaration
The Savoy Declaration is a modification of the Westminster Confession of Faith (1646). Its full title is A Declaration of the Faith and Order owned and practiced in the Congregational
Congregational
Churches in England. It was drawn up in October 1658 by English Independents meeting at the Savoy Palace, London.Contents1 The Assembly 2 The Declaration 3 References 4 External linksThe Assembly[edit] The Savoy Assembly (not to be confused with the Savoy Conference
Savoy Conference
a few years later) met at the Savoy for eleven or twelve days from 12 October 1658. Representatives, mostly laymen, of over a hundred independent churches were present
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