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Categorization
Categorization is an activity that consists of putting things, such as objects, ideas, or people, into categories (classes, types, index) based on their similarities or common criteria. It is sometimes considered synonymous with classification (cf., Classification synonyms). Categorization and classification allow humans to organize things, objects, and ideas that exist around them and simplify their understanding of the world.[1] Categorization is something that humans and other organisms do: "doing the right thing with the right kind of thing." The activity of categorizing things can be nonverbal or verbal. For humans, both concrete objects and abstract ideas are recognized, differentiated, and understood through categorization. Objects are usually categorized for some adaptive or pragmatic purposes. Categorization is grounded in the features that distinguish the category's members from nonmembers
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Bliss Bibliographic Classification
The Bliss bibliographic classification (BC) is a library classification system that was created by Henry E. Bliss (1870–1955) and published in four volumes between 1940 and 1953. Although originally devised in the United States, it was more commonly adopted by British libraries.[1] A second edition of the system (BC2) has been in ongoing development in Britain since 1977. Henry E. Bliss began working on the Bliss Classification system while working at the City College of New York Library as Assistant Librarian.[2] He was a critic of Melvil Dewey's work with the Dewey Decimal System and believed that organization of titles needed to be done with an intellectual mind frame. Being overly pragmatic or simply alphabetical, would be inadequate
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Cutter Expansive Classification
The Cutter Expansive Classification system is a library classification system devised by Charles Ammi Cutter. The system was the basis for the top categories of the Library of Congress Classification.[1] Charles Ammi Cutter (1837–1903), inspired by the decimal classification of his contemporary Melvil Dewey, and with Dewey's initial encouragement, developed his own classification scheme for the Winchester Town Library and then the Boston Athenaeum,[2] at which he served as librarian for twenty-four years. He began work on it around the year 1880, publishing an overview of the new system in 1882
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Cutter Number
The Cutter Expansive Classification system is a library classification system devised by Charles Ammi Cutter. The system was the basis for the top categories of the Library of Congress Classification.[1] Charles Ammi Cutter (1837–1903), inspired by the decimal classification of his contemporary Melvil Dewey, and with Dewey's initial encouragement, developed his own classification scheme for the Winchester Town Library and then the Boston Athenaeum,[2] at which he served as librarian for twenty-four years. He began work on it around the year 1880, publishing an overview of the new system in 1882
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Library Catalog

A library catalog (or library catalogue in British English) is a register of all bibliographic items found in a library or group of libraries, such as a network of libraries at several locations. A bibliographic item can be any information entity (e.g., books, computer files, graphics, realia, cartographic materials, etc.) that is considered library material (e.g., a single novel in an anthology), or a group of library materials (e.g., a trilogy), or linked from the catalog (e.g., a webpage) as far as it is relevant to the catalog and to the users (patrons) of the library. The card catalog was a familiar sight to library users for generations, but it has been effectively replaced by the online public access catalog (OPAC). Some still refer to the online catalog as a "card catalog".[1] Some libraries with OPAC access still have card catalogs on site, but these are now strictly a secondary resource and are seldom updated
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Classification (general Theory)
Classification is a term used both about the process to classify (distinguishing and distribution kinds of "things" into different groups) and about the resulting set of classes, as well as the assignment of elements to pre-established classes. To classify in the broad meaning given above is a fundamental concept and a part of almost all kinds of activities, and it is an interdisciplinary field of study. Among the most important contributing disciplines are philosophy, biology, knowledge organization, psychology, statistics and mathematics. Frederick Suppe[1] distinguished two senses of classification: a broad meaning, which he called "conceptual classification" and a narrow meaning, which he called "systematic classification". About conceptual classification Suppe (1989, 292) wrote: "Classification is intrinsic to the use of language, hence to most if not all communication
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Document Classification
Document classification or document categorization is a problem in library science, information science and computer science. The task is to assign a document to one or more classes or categories. This may be done "manually" (or "intellectually") or algorithmically. The intellectual classification of documents has mostly been the province of library science, while the algorithmic classification of documents is mainly in information science and computer science. The problems are overlapping, however, and there is therefore interdisciplinary research on document classification. The documents to be classified may be texts, images, music, etc. Each kind of document possesses its special classification problems
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