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Cahaba, Alabama
Cahaba, also spelled Cahawba, was the first permanent state capital of Alabama
Alabama
from 1820 to 1825,[2] and county seat of Dallas County, Alabama
Alabama
until 1866. It suffered a major flood in 1865 and the state legislature moved the county seat to Selma, which was better situated. The former settlement is now a ghost town and state historic site. The site is located southwest of Selma, at the confluence of the Alabama and Cahaba rivers, which made it prone to seasonal flooding.[3]Contents1 Demographics 2 History2.1 Capital 2.2 Antebellum 2.3 Postbellum 2.4 Modern3 Folklore 4 Notable people 5 Gallery 6 See also 7 References 8 Bibliography 9 External linksDemographics[edit]Historical populationCensus Pop.%±1860 1,920—1870 431−77.6%1880 384−10.9%U.S. Decennial Census[4]Cahawba was listed on the 1860-1880 U.S. Censuses
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National Register Of Historic Places
The National Register of Historic Places
National Register of Historic Places
(NRHP) is the United States federal government's official list of districts, sites, buildings, structures, and objects deemed worthy of preservation for their historical significance. A property listed in the National Register, or located within a National Register Historic District, may qualify for tax incentives derived from the total value of expenses incurred preserving the property. The passage of the National Historic Preservation Act (NHPA) in 1966 established the National Register and the process for adding properties to it. Of the more than one million properties on the National Register, 80,000 are listed individually
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Steamboat
A steamboat is a boat that is propelled primarily by steam power, typically driving propellers or paddlewheels. Steamboats sometimes use the prefix designation SS, S.S. or S/S (for 'Screw Steamer') or PS (for 'Paddle Steamer'), however these designations are most often used for steamships. The term steamboat is used to refer to smaller, insular, steam-powered boats working on lakes and rivers, particularly riverboats
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American Civil War
Union victory:Dissolution of the Confederate States U.S. territorial integrity preserved Slavery abolished Beginning of the Reconstruction era Passage and ratification of the 13th, 14th and 15th amendments to the Constitution of the United StatesBelligerents  United States  Confederate StatesCommanders and leaders Abraham Lincoln
Abraham Lincoln
(Commander-in-Chief) Ulysses S. Grant William Tecumseh Sherman David Farragut George B. McClellan Henry Halleck Joseph Hooker George Meadeand others... Jefferson Davis
Jefferson Davis
(Commander-in-Chief) Robert E. Lee  Joseph E. Johnston  P. G. T. Beauregard  Albert Sidney Johnston † Braxton Bragg and others...Strength 2,200,000:[a] U.S. Army U.S. Marines U.S. Navy U.S. Revenue-Marine 698,000 (peak)[1][better source needed][2] 750,000–1,000,000:[a][3] C.S. Army C.S
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Confederate States Of America
The Confederate States of America
Confederate States of America
(CSA or C.S.), commonly referred to as the Confederacy, was an unrecognized country in North America that existed from 1861 to 1865. The Confederacy was originally formed by seven secessionist slave-holding states – South Carolina, Mississippi, Florida, Alabama, Georgia, Louisiana, and Texas
Texas
– in the Lower South
Lower South
region of the United States, whose regional economy was heavily dependent upon agriculture, particularly cotton, and a plantation system that relied upon the labor of African-American slaves.[2] Each state declared its secession from the United States
United States
following the November 1860 election of Republican candidate Abraham Lincoln
Abraham Lincoln
to the U.S. presidency on a platform which opposed the expansion of slavery into the western territories
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Nathan Bedford Forrest
American Civil WarFort Donelson Shiloh First Murfreesboro Chickamauga Fort Pillow Brice's Cross Roads Tupelo Second Memphis Third Murfreesboro Nashville Wilson's RaidRelationsNathan Forrest II (grandson) Nathan Forrest III (great grandson) Nathan Bedford Forrest
Nathan Bedford Forrest
(July 13, 1821 – October 29, 1877), called Bedford Forrest in his lifetime, was a Confederate Army general during the American Civil War
American Civil War
and the first Grand Wizard of the Ku Klux Klan. Before the war Forrest amassed substantial wealth as a cotton planter, horse and cattle trader, real estate broker, and slave trader. He was one of the few officers on either side during the war to enlist as a private and be promoted to general officer and corps commander without any military education or training
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James H. Wilson
James Harrison Wilson (September 2, 1837 – February 23, 1925) was a United States
United States
Army topographic engineer and a Union Army
Union Army
Major General in the American Civil War. He served as an aide to Maj. Gen. George B. McClellan during the Maryland Campaign
Maryland Campaign
before joining Maj. Gen. Ulysses S. Grant's army in the Western Theater, where he was promoted to brigadier general
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Battle Of Selma
Coordinates: 32°25′26″N 87°01′25″W / 32.4240°N 87.0237°W / 32.4240; -87.0237Battle of SelmaPart of American Civil WarDate April 2, 1865 (1865-04-02)Location Selma, AlabamaResult Union victoryBelligerents United States
United States
(Union) CSA (Confederacy)Commanders and leadersJames H. Wilson Nathan Bedford ForrestUnits involvedCavalry Corps, Military Division of the Mississippi Forrest's Cavalry Corps MilitiaStrength9,000 4,000Casualties and losses359[1] 2,700[2]v t e Wilson's Raid
Wilson's Raid
in Alabama
Alabama
and GeorgiaEbenezer Church Selma West Point ColumbusJames WilsonThe Battle of Selma
Battle of Selma
was a military engagement near the end of the American Civil War
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Reconstruction Era Of The United States
The Reconstruction
Reconstruction
era was the period from 1863 (the legal end of most slavery in the United States) or 1865 (the end of the Confederacy) to 1877. In the context of the history of the United States, the term has two applications: the first applies to the complete history of the entire country from 1865 to 1877 following the Civil War; the second, to the attempted transformation of the 11 ex-Confederate states from 1863 to 1877, as directed by Congress. Reconstruction
Reconstruction
ended the remnants of Confederate nationalism and of slavery, making the Freedmen
Freedmen
citizens with civil rights apparently guaranteed by three new Constitutional amendments
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Ghost
In folklore, a ghost (sometimes known as an apparition, haunt, phantom, poltergeist, shade, specter or spectre, spirit, spook, and wraith) is the soul or spirit of a dead person or animal that can appear to the living. In ghostlore, descriptions of ghosts vary widely from an invisible presence to translucent or barely visible wispy shapes, to realistic, lifelike visions. The deliberate attempt to contact the spirit of a deceased person is known as necromancy, or in spiritism as a séance. The belief in the existence of an afterlife, as well as manifestations of the spirits of the dead is widespread, dating back to animism or ancestor worship in pre-literate cultures. Certain religious practices—funeral rites, exorcisms, and some practices of spiritualism and ritual magic—are specifically designed to rest the spirits of the dead
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Mobile, Alabama
Mobile (/moʊˈbiːl/ moh-BEEL; French pronunciation: ​[mɔ.bil]) is the county seat of Mobile County, Alabama, United States. The population within the city limits was 195,111 as of the 2010 United States Census,[10] making it the third most populous city in Alabama, the most populous in Mobile County, and the largest municipality on the Gulf Coast between New Orleans, Louisiana, and St
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Anderson Crenshaw
Anderson Crenshaw (1783–1847) was an American jurist in the U.S. state of Alabama. Born in South Carolina on May 22, 1783, Crenshaw was the first graduate of the South Carolina College at Columbia, later renamed the University of South Carolina. He became active in politics and was elected to the South Carolina legislature in 1812. Several years later in 1819 he moved to Cahawba, the first state capital of Alabama. There, he was appointed a judge of the circuit court from 1821–1838, of the state supreme court from 1832, and as chancellor of the southern division of the state's courts
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Reportedly Haunted Locations In Alabama
This is a list of locations in the United States which have been reported to be haunted by ghosts or other supernatural beings, including demons.States with a great many haunted locations are listed on separate pages, linked from this page.Part of a series of articles on the paranormalMain articlesAfterlife Angel Astral projection Aura Bilocation Clairvoyance Close encounter Cold spot Conjuration Deity Demon Demonic possession Demonology Devil Ectoplasm Electronic voice phenomenon Exorcism Extrasensory perception Fairy Fear of ghosts Forteana Ghost Ghost
Ghost
hunting
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National Park Service
The National Park Service
National Park Service
(NPS) is an agency of the United States federal government that manages all national parks, many national monuments, and other conservation and historical properties with various title designations.[1] It was created on August 25, 1916, by Congress through the National Park Service
National Park Service
Organic Act[2] and is an agency of the United States Department of the Interior
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International Standard Book Number
The International Standard Book
Book
Number (ISBN) is a numeric commercial book identifier which is intended to be unique.[a][b] Publishers purchase ISBNs from an affiliate of the International ISBN Agency.[1] An ISBN is assigned to each separate edition and variation (except reprintings) of a publication. For example, an e-book, a paperback and a hardcover edition of the same book will each have a different ISBN. The ISBN is ten digits long if assigned before 2007, and thirteen digits long if assigned on or after 1 January 2007. The method of assigning an ISBN is nation-specific and varies between countries, often depending on how large the publishing industry is within a country. The initial ISBN identification format was devised in 1967, based upon the 9-digit Standard Book
Book
Numbering (SBN) created in 1966
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Special
Special
Special
or the specials or variation, may refer to:.mw-parser-output .tocright float:right;clear:right;width:auto;background:none;padding:.5em 0 .8em 1.4em;margin-bottom:.5em .mw-parser-output .tocright-clear-left clear:left .mw-parser-output .tocright-clear-both clear:both .mw-parser-output .tocright-clear-none clear:none Contents1 Policing 2 Literature 3 Film and television 4 Music4.1 Albums 4.2 Songs5 Computing 6 Other uses 7 See alsoPolicing[edit] Specials, Ulster
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