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Café Guerbois
Café
Café
Guerbois, on Avenue de Clichy in Paris, was the site of late 19th-century discussions and planning amongst artists, writers and art lovers – the bohèmes (bohemians), in contrast to the bourgeois. Centered on Édouard Manet, the group gathered at the café usually on Sundays and Thursdays. Émile Zola, Frédéric Bazille, Louis Edmond Duranty, Henri Fantin-Latour, Edgar Degas, Claude Monet, Pierre-Auguste Renoir
Pierre-Auguste Renoir
and Alfred Sisley
Alfred Sisley
regularly joined in the discussions.[1] Sometimes Paul Cézanne and Camille Pissarro
Camille Pissarro
also joined them. The group is sometimes called The Batignolles Group, and many of the members are associated with impressionism. Conversations there were often heated. On one evening in February 1870, things became so heated that Manet, insulted by a review that Duranty wrote, wounded Duranty in a duel
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Paris
1 French Land Register data, which excludes lakes, ponds, glaciers > 1 km2 (0.386 sq mi or 247 acres) and river estuaries. 2 Population without double counting: residents of multiple communes (e.g., students and military personnel) only counted once. Paris
Paris
(French pronunciation: ​[paʁi] ( listen)) is the capital and most populous city in France, with an administrative-limits area of 105 square kilometres (41 square miles) and an official population of 2,206,488 (2015).[5] The city is a commune and department, and the heart of the 12,012-square-kilometre (4
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Bohemianism
Bohemianism
Bohemianism
is the practice of an unconventional lifestyle, often in the company of like-minded people and with few permanent ties. It involves musical, artistic, literary or spiritual pursuits. In this context, Bohemians may or may not be wanderers, adventurers, or vagabonds. This use of the word bohemian first appeared in the English language in the nineteenth century to describe the non-traditional lifestyles of marginalized and impoverished artists, writers, journalists, musicians, and actors in major European cities.[1] Bohemians were associated with unorthodox or anti-establishment political or social viewpoints, which often were expressed through free love, frugality, and—in some cases—voluntary poverty
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OCLC
OCLC, currently incorporated as OCLC
OCLC
Online Computer Library Center, Incorporated,[3] is an American nonprofit cooperative organization "dedicated to the public purposes of furthering access to the world's information and reducing information costs".[4] It was founded in 1967 as the Ohio College Library Center. OCLC
OCLC
and its member libraries cooperatively produce and maintain WorldCat, the largest online public access catalog (OPAC) in the world
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Special
Special
Special
or specials may refer to:Contents1 Music 2 Film and television 3 Other uses 4 See alsoMusic[edit] Special
Special
(album), a 1992
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International Standard Book Number
"ISBN" redirects here. For other uses, see ISBN (other).International Standard Book
Book
NumberA 13-digit ISBN, 978-3-16-148410-0, as represented by an EAN-13 bar codeAcronym ISBNIntroduced 1970; 48 years ago (1970)Managing organisation International ISBN AgencyNo. of digits 13 (formerly 10)Check digit Weighted sumExample 978-3-16-148410-0Website www.isbn-international.orgThe International Standard Book
Book
Number (ISBN) is a unique[a][b] numeric commercial book identifier. Publishers purchase ISBNs from an affiliate of the International ISBN Agency.[1] An ISBN is assigned to each edition and variation (except reprintings) of a book. For example, an e-book, a paperback and a hardcover edition of the same book would each have a different ISBN. The ISBN is 13 digits long if assigned on or after 1 January 2007, and 10 digits long if assigned before 2007
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Duel
A duel is an arranged engagement in combat between two people, with matched weapons, in accordance with agreed-upon rules. Duels in this form were chiefly practiced in early modern Europe with precedents in the medieval code of chivalry, and continued into the modern period (19th to early 20th centuries) especially among military officers. During the 17th and 18th centuries (and earlier), duels were mostly fought with swords (the rapier, and later the smallsword), but beginning in the late 18th century in England, duels were more commonly fought using pistols. Fencing
Fencing
and pistol duels continued to co-exist throughout the 19th century. The duel was based on a code of honor
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Camille Pissarro
Camille Pissarro
Camille Pissarro
(French: [kamij pisaʁo]; 10 July 1830 – 13 November 1903) was a Danish-French Impressionist
Impressionist
and Neo- Impressionist
Impressionist
painter born on the island of St Thomas (now in the US Virgin Islands, but then in the Danish West Indies). His importance resides in his contributions to both Impressionism
Impressionism
and Post-Impressionism. Pissarro studied from great forerunners, including Gustave Courbet
Gustave Courbet
and Jean-Baptiste-Camille Corot
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Paul Cézanne
Paul Cézanne
Paul Cézanne
(US: /seɪˈzæn/ or UK: /sɪˈzæn/; French: [pɔl sezan]; 19 January 1839 – 22 October 1906) was a French artist and Post-Impressionist
Post-Impressionist
painter whose work laid the foundations of the transition from the 19th-century conception of artistic endeavor to a new and radically different world of art in the 20th century. Cézanne's often repetitive, exploratory brushstrokes are highly characteristic and clearly recognizable. He used planes of colour and small brushstrokes that build up to form complex fields. The paintings convey Cézanne's intense study of his subjects. Cézanne is said to have formed the bridge between late 19th-century Impressionism
Impressionism
and the early 20th century's new line of artistic enquiry, Cubism
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Pierre-auguste Renoir
Pierre-Auguste Renoir, commonly known as Auguste Renoir (US: /rɛnˈwɑːr/ or UK: /ˈrɛnwɑːr/; French: [pjɛʁ oɡyst ʁənwaʁ]; 25 February 1841 – 3 December 1919), was a French artist who was a leading painter in the development of the Impressionist style
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Claude Monet
Oscar- Claude Monet
Claude Monet
(/moʊˈneɪ/; French: [klod mɔnɛ]; 14 November 1840 – 5 December 1926) was a founder of French Impressionist painting, and the most consistent and prolific practitioner of the movement's philosophy of expressing one's perceptions before nature, especially as applied to plein-air landscape painting.[1][2] The term "Impressionism" is derived from the title of his painting Impression, soleil levant (Impression, Sunrise), which was exhibited in 1874 in the first of the independent exhibitions mounted by Monet and his as
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Edgar Degas
Edgar Degas
Edgar Degas
(US: /deɪˈɡɑː/ or UK: /ˈdeɪɡɑː/; born Hilaire-Germain-Edgar De Gas, French: [ilɛːʁ ʒɛʁmɛ̃ ɛdɡaʁ də ɡɑ]; 19 July 1834 – 27 September 1917) was a French artist famous for his paintings, sculptures, prints, and drawings. He is especially identified with the subject of dance; more than half of his works depict dancers.[1] He is regarded as one of the founders of Impressionism, although he rejected the term, preferring to be called a realist.[2] He was a superb draftsman, and particularly masterly in depicting movement, as can be seen in his rendition of dancers, racecourse subjects and female nudes. His portraits are notable for their psychological complexity and for their portrayal of human isolation.[3] At the beginning of his career, Degas wanted to be a history painter, a calling for which he was well prepared by his rigorous academic training and close study of classic art
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Henri Fantin-Latour
Henri Fantin-Latour
Henri Fantin-Latour
(14 January 1836 – 25 August 1904) was a French painter and lithographer best known for his flower paintings and group portraits of Parisian artists and writers.[1]Contents1 Biography 2 Legacy 3 Public collections holding works by Fantin-Latour 4 Gallery 5 Notes 6 References 7 External linksBiography[edit] Henri Fantin-Latour
Henri Fantin-Latour
- A Studio at Les Batignolles, Un atelier aux Batignolles, parody, "Worshipping Manet", 1870He was born Ignace Henri Jean Théodore Fantin-Latour in Grenoble, Isère
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Frédéric Bazille
Jean Frédéric Bazille
Frédéric Bazille
(December 6, 1841 – November 28, 1870) was a French Impressionist painter. Many of Bazille's major works are examples of figure painting in which he placed the subject figure within a landscape painted en plein air.[1]Contents1 Life and work 2 Main works 3 Selected paintings 4 Notes 5 References 6 External linksLife and work[edit]Bazille's Studio; 9 Rue de la Condamine, 1870, Musée d'Orsay, Paris. From left to right: Pierre Auguste Renoir
Pierre Auguste Renoir
sitting, Emile Zola (standing on the stairs), Eduard Manet
Eduard Manet
and Claude Monet
Claude Monet
(with the hat) – next to Bazille, talking about one of his paintings.[2] Frédéric Bazille
Frédéric Bazille
was born in Montpellier, Hérault, Languedoc-Roussillon, France, into a wealthy Protestant
Protestant
family
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Émile Zola
Émile Édouard Charles Antoine Zola (/ˈzoʊlə/;[1] French: [e.mil zo.la]; 2 April 1840 – 29 September 1902)[2] was a French novelist, playwright, journalist, the best-known practitioner of the literary school of naturalism, and an important contributor to the development of theatrical naturalism. He was a major figure in the political liberalization of France and in the exoneration of the falsely accused and convicted army officer Alfred Dreyfus, which is encapsulated in the renowned newspaper headline J'accuse
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Café
A coffeehouse, coffee shop or café (sometimes spelt cafe) is an establishment which primarily serves hot coffee, related coffee beverages (café latte, cappuccino, espresso), tea, and other hot beverages. Some coffeehouses also serve cold beverages such as iced coffee and iced tea. Many cafés also serve some type of food, such as light snacks, muffins or pastries. Coffeehouses range from owner-operated. small businesses to large multinational corporations. In continental Europe, cafés often serve alcoholic beverages and light food, but elsewhere the term "café" may also refer to a tea room, "greasy spoon" (a small and inexpensive restaurant, colloquially called a "caff"), transport café, or other casual eating and drinking place.[1][2][3][4][5] A coffeehouse may share some of the same characteristics of a bar or restaurant, but it is different from a cafeteria
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