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Caesar (title)
Caesar (English pl. Caesars; Latin
Latin
pl. Caesares) is a title of imperial character. It derives from the cognomen of Julius Caesar, the Roman dictator
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Julius Caesar (play)
The ghost of Caesar
Caesar
taunts Brutus about his imminent defeat. ( Copperplate engraving
Copperplate engraving
by Edward Scriven from a painting by Richard Westall: London, 1802.)The Tragedy of Julius Caesar
Julius Caesar
is a history play and tragedy by William Shakespeare, believed to have been written in 1599
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Empire Of Trebizond
The Empire of Trebizond
Empire of Trebizond
or the Trapezuntine Empire was a monarchy that flourished during the 13th through 15th centuries, consisting of the far northeastern corner of Anatolia
Anatolia
and the southern Crimea. The empire was first formed as a revolt against the rule of the Angelos dynasty of the Byzantine Empire, which had deposed Emperor Andronikos I Komnenos
Komnenos
in 1185
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Julius Caesar
Gaius Julius Caesar[a] (/ˈsiːzər/; 12 or 13 July 100 BC[1] – 15 March 44 BC),[2] usually called Julius Caesar, was a Roman politician and general who played a critical role in the events that led to the demise of the Roman Republic
Roman Republic
and the rise of the Roman Empire. He is also known as a notable author of Latin
Latin
prose. In 60 BC, Caesar, Crassus
Crassus
and Pompey
Pompey
formed a political alliance that dominated Roman politics
Roman politics
for several years. Their attempts to amass power as Populares were opposed by the Optimates within the Roman Senate, among them Cato the Younger
Cato the Younger
with the frequent support of Cicero
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Pontifex Maximus
The Pontifex Maximus
Pontifex Maximus
or pontifex maximus (Latin, "greatest priest"[1][2][3]) was the chief high priest of the College of Pontiffs (Collegium Pontificum) in ancient Rome. This was the most important position in the ancient Roman religion, open only to patricians until 254 BC, when a plebeian first occupied this post. A distinctly religious office under the early Roman Republic, it gradually became politicized until, beginning with Augustus, it was subsumed into the Imperial office
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Roman Empire
Mediolanum
Mediolanum
(286–402, Western) Augusta Treverorum Sirmium Ravenna
Ravenna
(402–476, Western) Nicomedia
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Magister Militum
Magister militum
Magister militum
( Latin
Latin
for "Master of the Soldiers", plural magistri militum) was a top-level military command used in the later Roman Empire, dating from the reign of Constantine the Great.[dubious – discuss] Used alone, the term referred to the senior military officer (equivalent to a war theatre commander, the emperor remaining the supreme commander) of the Empire
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Magister Equitum
The Magister equitum, in English Master of the Horse
Master of the Horse
or Master of the Cavalry, was a Roman magistrate
Roman magistrate
appointed as lieutenant to a dictator. His nominal function was to serve as commander of the
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Triumvirate
A triumvirate (Latin: triumvirātus) is a political regime ruled or dominated by three powerful individuals known as triumvirs (Latin: triumviri). The arrangement can be formal or informal. Though the three are notionally equal, this is rarely the case in reality. The term can also be used to describe a state with three different military leaders who all claim to be the sole leader. In the context of the Soviet Union
Soviet Union
and Russia, the term troika (Russian for "group of three") is used for "triumvirate"
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Decemviri
The decemviri or decemvirs ( Latin
Latin
for "ten men") were any of several 10-man commissions established by the Roman Republic. The most important were those of the two Decemvirates, formally the "Decemvirs Writing the Laws with Consular Imperium" (Latin: Decemviri Legibus Scribundis Consulari Imperio) who reformed and codified Roman law during the Conflict of the Orders
Conflict of the Orders
between ancient Rome's patrician aristocracy and plebeian commoners
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Roman Censor
The censor was a magistrate in ancient Rome
Rome
who was responsible for maintaining the census, supervising public morality, and overseeing certain aspects of the government's finances.[1] The power of the censors is absolute: no magistrate can oppose their decisions, only another censor who succeeds them could cancel it. The censors' regulation of public morality is the origin of the modern meaning of the words "censor" and "censorship".[2]Contents1 Early history of the magistracy 2 Election 3 Attributes 4 Abolition 5 Duties5.1 Census5.1.1 Census
Census
beyond Rome 5.1.2 Other uses of census5.2 Regimen morum5.2.1 Punishments5.3 Administration of the finances of the state 5.4 Lustrum6 Census
Census
statistics6.1 Sources7 See also 8 References 9 External linksEarly history of the magistracy[edit] The census was first instituted by Servius
Servius
Tullius, sixth king of Rome
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Roman Governor
A Roman governor
Roman governor
was an official either elected or appointed to be the chief administrator of Roman law
Roman law
throughout one or more of the many provinces constituting the Roman Empire. A Roman governor
Roman governor
is also known as a propraetor or proconsul. The generic term in Roman legal language was Rector provinciae, regardless of the specific titles, which also reflect the province's intrinsic and strategic status, and corresponding differences in authority. By the time of the early empire, there were two types of provinces — senatorial and imperial — and several types of governor would emerge
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Roman Dictator
A dictator was a magistrate of the Roman Republic, entrusted with the full authority of the state to deal with a military emergency or to undertake a specific duty. All other magistrates were subordinate to his imperium, and the right of the plebeian tribunes to veto his actions or of the people to appeal from them was extremely limited. However, in order to prevent the dictatorship from threatening the state itself, severe limitations were placed upon its powers: a dictator could only act within his intended sphere of authority; and he was obliged to resign his office once his appointed task had been accomplished, or at the expiration of six months. Dictators were regularly appointed from the earliest period of the Republic down to the Second Punic War, but the magistracy then went into abeyance for over a century, until it was revived in a significantly modified form, first by Sulla, and then by Julius Caesar
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Tribuni Militum Consulari Potestate
The tribuni militum consulari potestate ("military tribunes with consular power"), in English commonly also Consular Tribunes, were tribunes elected with consular power during the so-called "Conflict of the Orders" in the Roman Republic, starting in 444 BC and then continuously from 408 BC to 394 BC and again from 391 BC to 367 BC.Contents1 Origin and dissolution of the office 2 Consular Tribunes by year 3 See also 4 Notes 5 ReferencesOrigin and dissolution of the office[edit] According to the histories of Livy
Livy
and Dionysius of Halicarnassus,[citation needed] the magistracy of the tribuni militum consulari potestate was create
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King Of Rome
The King of Rome
The King of Rome
(Latin: Rex Romae) was the chief magistrate of the Roman Kingdom.[1] According to legend, the first king of Rome
Rome
was Romulus, who founded the city in 753 BC upon the Palatine Hill. Seven legendary kings are said to have ruled Rome
Rome
until 509 BC, when the last king was overthrown. These kings ruled for an average of 35 years. The kings after Romulus
Romulus
were not known to be dynasts and no reference is made to the hereditary principle until after the fifth king Tarquinius Priscus
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Prefect
Prefect
Prefect
(from the Latin
Latin
praefectus, substantive adjectival[1] form of praeficere: "put in front", i.e., in charge) is a magisterial title of varying definition, but which, basically, refers to the leader of an administrative area. A prefect's office, department, or area of control is called a prefecture, but in various post- Roman empire
Roman empire
cases there is a prefect without a prefecture or vice versa
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