HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

picture info

CFOP Method
The CFOP Method
CFOP Method
(Cross – F2L – OLL – PLL), sometimes known as the Fridrich method, is one of the most commonly used methods in speedsolving a 3×3×3 Rubik's Cube. This method was first developed in the early 1980s combining innovations by a number of speed cubers. Czech speedcuber Jessica Fridrich
Jessica Fridrich
is generally credited for popularizing it by publishing it online in 1997.[1] The method works on a layer-by-layer system, first solving a cross typically on the bottom, continuing to solve the first two layers (F2L), orienting the last layer (OLL), and finally permuting the last layer (PLL).Contents1 History 2 The method 3 Competition use 4 References 5 External linksHistory[edit] Basic layer-by-layer methods were among the first to arise during the early 1980s cube craze
[...More...]

"CFOP Method" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Great Dodecahedron
In geometry, the great dodecahedron is a Kepler–Poinsot polyhedron, with Schläfli symbol
Schläfli symbol
5,5/2 and Coxeter–Dynkin diagram
Coxeter–Dynkin diagram
of . It is one of four nonconvex regular polyhedra
[...More...]

"Great Dodecahedron" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Truncated Icosahedron
In geometry, the truncated icosahedron is an Archimedean solid, one of 13 convex isogonal nonprismatic solids whose faces are two or more types of regular polygons. It has 12 regular pentagonal faces, 20 regular hexagonal faces, 60 vertices and 90 edges. It is the Goldberg polyhedron
Goldberg polyhedron
GPV(1,1) or 5+,3 1,1, containing pentagonal and hexagonal faces. This geometry is associated with footballs (soccer balls) typically patterned with white hexagons and black pentagons. Geodesic domes such as those whose architecture Buckminster Fuller
Buckminster Fuller
pioneered are often based on this structure
[...More...]

"Truncated Icosahedron" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Dodecahedron
In geometry, a dodecahedron (Greek δωδεκάεδρον, from δώδεκα dōdeka "twelve" + ἕδρα hédra "base", "seat" or "face") is any polyhedron with twelve flat faces. The most familiar dodecahedron is the regular dodecahedron, which is a Platonic solid. There are also three regular star dodecahedra, which are constructed as stellations of the convex form. All of these have icosahedral symmetry, order 120. The pyritohedron is an irregular pentagonal dodecahedron, having the same topology as the regular one but pyritohedral symmetry while the tetartoid has tetrahedral symmetry. The rhombic dodecahedron, seen as a limiting case of the pyritohedron, has octahedral symmetry. The elongated dodecahedron and trapezo-rhombic dodecahedron variations, along with the rhombic dodecahedra, are space-filling
[...More...]

"Dodecahedron" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Tetrahedron
In geometry, a tetrahedron (plural: tetrahedra or tetrahedrons), also known as a triangular pyramid, is a polyhedron composed of four triangular faces, six straight edges, and four vertex corners. The tetrahedron is the simplest of all the ordinary convex polyhedra and the only one that has fewer than 5 faces.[1] The tetrahedron is the three-dimensional case of the more general concept of a Euclidean simplex, and may thus also be called a 3-simplex. The tetrahedron is one kind of pyramid, which is a polyhedron with a flat polygon base and triangular faces connecting the base to a common point. In the case of a tetrahedron the base is a triangle (any of the four faces can be considered the base), so a tetrahedron is also known as a "triangular pyramid". Like all convex polyhedra, a tetrahedron can be folded from a single sheet of paper
[...More...]

"Tetrahedron" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Panagiotis Verdes
Panagiotis Verdes
Panagiotis Verdes
is the Greek inventor of the 6x6x6, 7x7x7, 8x8x8 and 9x9x9 Twisty Puzzles. He has also worked on new designs of every Twisty Puzzle from 2x2x2 to 11x11x11.[1] Inventions[edit]The V-Cube 6
V-Cube 6
in solved stateThe V-Cube 7
V-Cube 7
in solved statePrior to Verdes's invention, the 6x6x6 cube was thought to be impossible due to geometry constraints. Verdes's invention uses a completely different mechanism than the smaller Rubik's cubes; his mechanism is based on concentric, right-angle conical surfaces whose axes of rotation coincide with the semi-axes of the cube.[1] The patents for the cubes were awarded in 2004, and mass-production began in 2008. Verdes's mechanism allows cubes of up to size 11x11x11, as larger cubes have geometrical constraints.[1] References[edit]^ a b c Slocum, Jerry (2009). The Cube: The Ultimate Guide to the World's Bestselling Puzzle
[...More...]

"Panagiotis Verdes" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Tony Fisher (puzzle Designer)
Fisher
Fisher
is an archaic term for a fisherman, revived as gender-neutral. Fisher, Fishers or The Fisher
Fisher
may also refer to: Fisher (animal)
[...More...]

"Tony Fisher (puzzle Designer)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Helicopter Cube
A helicopter is a type of rotorcraft in which lift and thrust are supplied by rotors. This allows the helicopter to take off and land vertically, to hover, and to fly forward, backward, and laterally. These attributes allow helicopters to be used in congested or isolated areas where fixed-wing aircraft and many forms of VTOL
VTOL
(vertical takeoff and landing) aircraft cannot perform. The English word helicopter is adapted from the French word hélicoptère, coined by Gustave Ponton d'Amécourt in 1861, which originates from the Greek helix (ἕλιξ) "helix, spiral, whirl, convolution"[1] and pteron (πτερόν) "wing".[2][3][4][5] English language nicknames for helicopter include "chopper", "copter", "helo", "heli", and "whirlybird". Helicopters were developed and built during the first half-century of flight, with the Focke-Wulf Fw 61
Focke-Wulf Fw 61
being the first operational helicopter in 1936
[...More...]

"Helicopter Cube" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Muscle Memory
Muscle
Muscle
memory has been used synonymously with motor learning, which is a form of procedural memory that involves consolidating a specific motor task into memory through repetition. When a movement is repeated over time, a long-term muscle memory is created for that task, eventually allowing it to be performed without conscious effort. This process decreases the need for attention and creates maximum efficiency within the motor and memory systems
[...More...]

"Muscle Memory" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Pattern Recognition
Pattern recognition
Pattern recognition
is a branch of machine learning that focuses on the recognition of patterns and regularities in data, although it is in some cases considered to be nearly synonymous with machine learning.[1] Pattern recognition
Pattern recognition
systems are in many cases trained from labeled "training" data (supervised learning), but when no labeled data are available other algorithms can be used to discover previously unknown patterns (unsupervised learning). The terms pattern recognition, machine learning, data mining and knowledge discovery in databases (KDD) are hard to separate, as they largely overlap in their scope. Machine learning
Machine learning
is the common term for supervised learning methods[dubious – discuss] and originates from artificial intelligence, whereas KDD and data mining have a larger focus on unsupervised methods and stronger connection to business use
[...More...]

"Pattern Recognition" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Algorithm
In mathematics and computer science, an algorithm (/ˈælɡərɪðəm/ ( listen) AL-gə-ridh-əm) is an unambiguous specification of how to solve a class of problems. Algorithms can perform calculation, data processing and automated reasoning tasks. An algorithm is an effective method that can be expressed within a finite amount of space and time[1] and in a well-defined formal language[2] for calculating a function.[3] Starting from an initial state and initial input (perhaps empty),[4] the instructions describe a computation that, when executed, proceeds through a finite[5] number of well-defined successive states, eventually producing "output"[6] and terminating at a final ending state. The transition from one state to the next is not necessarily deterministic; some algorithms, known as randomized algorithms, incorporate random input.[7] The concept of algorithm has existed for centuries and the use of the concept can be ascribed to Greek mathematicians, e.g
[...More...]

"Algorithm" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Cuboid
In geometry, a cuboid is a convex polyhedron bounded by six quadrilateral faces, whose polyhedral graph is the same as that of a cube. While mathematical literature refers to any such polyhedron as a cuboid,[1] other sources use "cuboid" to refer to a shape of this type in which each of the faces is a rectangle (and so each pair of adjacent faces meets in a right angle); this more restrictive type of cuboid is also known as a rectangular cuboid, right cuboid, rectangular box, rectangular hexahedron, right rectangular prism, or rectangular parallelepiped.[2]Contents1 General cuboids 2 Rectangular cuboid2.1 Nets3 See also 4 References 5 External linksGeneral cuboids[edit] By Euler's formula the numbers of faces F, of vertices V, and of edges E of any convex polyhedron are related by the formula F + V = E + 2
[...More...]

"Cuboid" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Octahedron
In geometry, an octahedron (plural: octahedra) is a polyhedron with eight faces, twelve edges, and six vertices. The term is most commonly used to refer to the regular octahedron, a Platonic solid
Platonic solid
composed of eight equilateral triangles, four of which meet at each vertex. A regular octahedron is the dual polyhedron of a cube. It is a rectified tetrahedron. It is a square bipyramid in any of three orthogonal orientations
[...More...]

"Octahedron" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Icosahedron
In geometry, an icosahedron (/ˌaɪkɒsəˈhiːdrən, -kə-, -koʊ-/ or /aɪˌkɒsəˈhiːdrən/[1]) is a polyhedron with 20 faces. The name comes from Greek εἴκοσι (eíkosi), meaning 'twenty', and ἕδρα (hédra), meaning 'seat'. The plural can be either "icosahedra" (/-drə/) or "icosahedrons". There are many kinds of icosahedra, with some being more symmetrical than others
[...More...]

"Icosahedron" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Pyraminx Crystal
The Pyraminx
Pyraminx
Crystal is a dodecahedral puzzle similar to the Rubik's Cube and the Megaminx. It is manufactured by Uwe Mèffert and has been sold in his puzzle shop since 2008. The puzzle was originally called the Brilic,[1] and was first made in 2006 by Aleh Hladzilin,[2] a member of the Twisty Puzzles Forum. It is not to be confused with the Pyraminx, which is also invented and sold by Meffert.Contents1 History 2 Description 3 Solutions 4 Number of combinations 5 See also 6 ReferencesHistory[edit]White-bodied Pyraminx
Pyraminx
Crystal with a star pattern applied to the faces.The Pyraminx
Pyraminx
Crystal was patented in Europe on July 16, 1987. The patent number is DE8707783U. In late 2007, due to requests by puzzle fans worldwide, Uwe Mèffert began manufacturing the puzzle. The puzzles were first shipped in February 2008
[...More...]

"Pyraminx Crystal" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Skewb Diamond
The Skewb
Skewb
Diamond is an octahedron-shaped puzzle similar to the Rubik's Cube. It has 14 movable pieces which can be rearranged in a total of 138,240 possible combinations. This puzzle is the dual polyhedron of the Skewb.Contents1 Description 2 Number of combinations 3 See also 4 External linksDescription[edit] The Skewb
Skewb
Diamond has 6 octahedral corner pieces and 8 triangular face centers. All pieces can move relative to each other. It is a deep-cut puzzle; its planes of rotation bisect it. It is very closely related to the Skewb, and shares the same piece count and mechanism. However, the triangular "corners" present on the Skewb
Skewb
have no visible orientation on the Skewb
Skewb
Diamond, and the square "centers" gain a visible orientation on the Skewb
Skewb
Diamond
[...More...]

"Skewb Diamond" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
.