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Optical Disc
In computing and optical disc recording technologies, an optical disc (OD) is a flat, usually circular disc that encodes binary data (bits) in the form of pits and lands (where change from pit to land or from land to pit corresponds to binary value of 1, no change, regardless whether in land or pit area, corresponds to binary value of 0) on a special material (often aluminum[1] ) on one of its flat surfaces. Optical discs are made using replication. This process can be used with all disc types. Recordable discs have pre-recorded vital information, like manufacturer, disc type, maximum speeds, etc. In replication, a cleanroom with yellow light is necessary to protect light sensitive materials and to prevent dust from corrupting the data on the disc
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Blu-ray

Blu-ray Disc (BD), often known simply as Blu-ray, is a digital optical disc storage format. It is designed to supersede the DVD format, capable of storing several hours of video in high-definition (HDTV 720p and 1080p). The main application of Blu-ray is as a medium for video material such as feature films and for the physical distribution of video games for the PlayStation 3, PlayStation 4, PlayStation 5, Xbox One and Xbox Series X
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DVD-RW
DVD recordable and DVD rewritable are optical disc recording technologies. Both terms describe DVD optical discs that can be written to by a DVD recorder, whereas only 'rewritable' discs are able to erase and rewrite data. Data is written ('burned') to the disc by a laser, rather than the data being 'pressed' onto the disc during manufacture, like a DVD-ROM. Pressing is used in mass production, primarily for the distribution of home video. Like CD-Rs, DVD recordable uses dye to store the data. During the burning of a single bit, the laser's intensity affects the reflective properties of the burned dye. By varying the laser intensity quickly, high density data is written in precise tracks. Since written tracks are made of darkened dye, the data side of a recordable DVD has a distinct color
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DVD+RW
DVD recordable and DVD rewritable are optical disc recording technologies. Both terms describe DVD optical discs that can be written to by a DVD recorder, whereas only 'rewritable' discs are able to erase and rewrite data. Data is written ('burned') to the disc by a laser, rather than the data being 'pressed' onto the disc during manufacture, like a DVD-ROM. Pressing is used in mass production, primarily for the distribution of home video. Like CD-Rs, DVD recordable uses dye to store the data. During the burning of a single bit, the laser's intensity affects the reflective properties of the burned dye. By varying the laser intensity quickly, high density data is written in precise tracks. Since written tracks are made of darkened dye, the data side of a recordable DVD has a distinct color
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DVD-D
DVD-Ds, also referred to as disposable DVDs,[1] are a type of digital versatile disc/digital video disc that is designed to be used for a maximum 48 hours after the containing package is opened.[2] After this time, the DVDs become unreadable to DVD players[1] because they contain a chemical that, after the set period of time, will prevent the underlying data from being read by DVD drives.[1] The medium in itself is copy protection neutral and does not require additional Digital Rights Management types of applications to be installed for the content to be accessible.[1] The technology used for DVD-Ds is different from that for earlier disposable DVDs. DVD-D has a reservoir in the central area of the disc which contains the chemical agent. When the disc spins for the first time the chemical agent moves and gets in contact with the reflective layer of the disc
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DVD-R DL
DVD-R DL (DL stands for Dual Layer[1]), also called DVD-R9, is a derivative of the DVD-R format standard. DVD-R DL discs hold 8.5 GB by utilizing two recordable dye layers, each capable of storing a little less than the 4.7 gigabyte (GB) of a single layer disc, almost doubling the total disc capacity. Discs can be read in many DVD devices (older units are less compatible) and can only be written using DVD-R DL compatible recorders. It is part of optical disc recording technologies for digital recording to optical disc. DVD-R DL has compatibility issues with legacy DVD-ROM drives known as pickup head overrun.[clarification needed] To avoid this issue, the two layers of the disc need to be equally recorded. But this is a contradiction with the sequential nature of the DVD recording
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Blu-ray 3D

Blu-ray Disc (BD), often known simply as Blu-ray, is a digital optical disc storage format. It is designed to supersede the DVD format, capable of storing several hours of video in high-definition (HDTV 720p and 1080p). The main application of Blu-ray is as a medium for video material such as feature films and for the physical distribution of video games for the PlayStation 3, PlayStation 4, PlayStation 5, Xbox One and Xbox Series X
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Ultra HD Blu-ray
Ultra HD Blu-ray (marketed as 4K Ultra HD) (UHD-BD) is a digital optical disc data storage format that is an enhanced variant of Blu-ray.[2] Ultra HD Blu-ray discs are incompatible with existing standard Blu-ray players (though in most cases, a traditional Blu-ray and digital copy has been packaged with the Ultra HD Blu-ray discs).[1] Ultra HD Blu-ray supports 4K UHD (3840 × 2160 pixel resolution) video at frame rates up to 60 progressive frames per second,[2] encoded using High Efficiency Video Coding.[2] The discs support both high dynamic range by increasing the color depth to 10-bit per color and a greater color gamut than supported by conventional Blu-ray video by using the Rec. 2020 color space. It is supported on Microsoft's Xbox One X[3] and One S;[4] the Xbox Series X and also on Sony's PlayStation 5[5][6] video game consoles
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