HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

C. A. Lejeune
Caroline Alice (C. A.) Lejeune (1897–1973) was a British writer, best known as the film critic of The Observer from 1928 to 1960.Contents1 Family 2 Journalism and other writing 3 Death 4 References 5 External linksFamily[edit] C. A. Lejeune was the youngest child in a large Victorian family that resided at 10, Wilmslow Road, Withington, Manchester. Her father was a Swiss cotton merchant who had come to England
England
after doing business in Frankfurt. Her mother, Louisa, who was the daughter of the Nonconformist minister Dr Alexander Maclaren, was a friend of C. P. Scott and of Caroline Herford, who was Caroline's godmother and Headmistress of Lady Barn House School, where Caroline received her elementary education
[...More...]

"C. A. Lejeune" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

The New York Times
The New York Times
The New York Times
(sometimes abbreviated as The NYT or The Times) is an American newspaper based in New York City
New York City
with worldwide influence and readership.[6][7][8] Founded in 1851, the paper has won 122 Pulitzer Prizes, more than any other newspaper.[9][10] As of September 2016, it had the largest combined print-and-digital circulation of any daily newspaper in the United States.[11] The New York Times is ranked 18th in the world by circulation. The paper is owned by The New York Times
The New York Times
Company, which is publicly traded but primarily controlled by the Ochs-Sulzberger family through a dual-class share structure.[12] It has been owned by the family since 1896; A.G
[...More...]

"The New York Times" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Système Universitaire De Documentation
The système universitaire de documentation or SUDOC is a system used by the libraries of French universities and higher education establishments to identify, track and manage the documents in their possession. The catalog, which contains more than 10 million references, allows students and researcher to search for bibliographical and location information in over 3,400 documentation centers. It is maintained by the Bibliographic Agency for Higher Education (fr) (ABES). External links[edit]Official websiteThis article relating to library science or information science is a stub
[...More...]

"Système Universitaire De Documentation" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Middlesex
Middlesex
Middlesex
(/ˈmɪdəlsɛks/, abbreviation: Middx) is a historic county in south-east England. It is now entirely within the wider urbanised area of London. Its area is now also mostly within the ceremonial county of Greater London, with small sections in other neighbouring ceremonial counties. It was established in the Anglo- Saxon
Saxon
system from the territory of the Middle Saxons, and existed as an official unit until 1965. The historic county includes land stretching north of the River Thames
River Thames
from 3 miles (5 km) east to 17 miles (27 km) west of the City of London
City of London
with the rivers Colne and Lea and a ridge of hills as the other boundaries
[...More...]

"Middlesex" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

United Kingdom
The United Kingdom
United Kingdom
of Great Britain
Great Britain
and Northern Ireland, commonly known as the United Kingdom
United Kingdom
(UK) or Britain, is a sovereign country in western Europe
[...More...]

"United Kingdom" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

Farmers' Weekly
Farmers Weekly is a magazine aimed at the British farming
British farming
industry. It provides news; business features; a weekly digest of facts and figures about British, European and world agriculture; and Livestock, Arable and Machinery sections with reports on technical developments, farm sales and analysis of prices. History and profile[edit] The first issue of The Farmers Weekly was on 22 June 1934,[1] costing 2d
[...More...]

"Farmers' Weekly" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Anthony Lejeune
Edward Anthony Thompson (7 August 1928 – 3 March 2018), known as Anthony Lejeune, was an English writer, editor, and broadcaster. He was described by The Times
The Times
as "always out of period, a misfit in the modern world for whom the term "young fogey" might have been invented".[1]Contents1 Early life and family 2 Career 3 Later life 4 Selected publications4.1 Fiction 4.2 Non-fiction 4.3 Edited5 ReferencesEarly life and family[edit] Anthony Lejeune
Anthony Lejeune
was born in London on 7 August 1928 to Edward Roffe Thompson, a psychologist and journalist, and Caroline Alice Lejeune, a film-reviewer for The Observer. He was educated at the Merchant Taylor's School, Northwood, and spent two years in the Royal Navy. He studied classics at Balliol College, University of Oxford, where he won the Newman Exhibition in Greek and English. He took his mother's surname but never legally changed his name
[...More...]

"Anthony Lejeune" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Television
Television
Television
(TV) is a telecommunication medium used for transmitting moving images in monochrome (black and white), or in colour, and in two or three dimensions and sound. The term can refer to a television set, a television program ("TV show"), or the medium of television transmission. Television
Television
is a mass medium for advertising, entertainment and news. Television
Television
became available in crude experimental forms in the late 1920s, but it would still be several years before the new technology would be marketed to consumers. After World War II, an improved form of black-and-white TV broadcasting became popular in the United States and Britain, and television sets became commonplace in homes, businesses, and institutions
[...More...]

"Television" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

National Diet Library
The National Diet
National Diet
Library (NDL) (国立国会図書館, Kokuritsu Kokkai Toshokan) is the national library of Japan
Japan
and among the largest libraries in the world. It was established in 1948 for the purpose of assisting members of the National Diet
National Diet
of Japan
Japan
(国会, Kokkai) in researching matters of public policy
[...More...]

"National Diet Library" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

The Three Hostages
The Three Hostages
The Three Hostages
is the fourth of five Richard Hannay novels by Scottish author John Buchan, first published in 1924 by Hodder & Stoughton, London. Hannay had previously appeared in The Thirty Nine Steps (1915), his most famous adventure in which he battles German spies across England and Scotland, and two books about his activities during the First World War,
[...More...]

"The Three Hostages" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

The Sunday Times (UK)
The Sunday Times
The Sunday Times
is the largest-selling British national newspaper in the "quality press" market category. It is published by Times Newspapers Ltd, a subsidiary of News UK, which is in turn owned by News Corp. Times Newspapers also publishes The Times. The two papers were founded independently and have been under common ownership only since 1966. They were bought by News International in 1981. The Sunday Times
The Sunday Times
occupies a dominant position in the quality Sunday market; its circulation of just under one million equals that of its main rivals, The Sunday Telegraph and The Observer, combined.[5] While some other national newspapers moved to a tabloid format in the early 2000s, The Sunday Times
The Sunday Times
has retained the larger broadsheet format and has said that it will continue to do so
[...More...]

"The Sunday Times (UK)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

John Bull (magazine)
The original John Bull was a Sunday newspaper established in the City, London EC4, by Theodore Hook
Theodore Hook
in 1820.[1]Contents1 Publication dates 2 End of publication 3 References 4 External linksPublication dates[edit] It was a popular periodical that continued in production through July 1892.[2] Titles with the same name were being published until 1960.[3] A magazine of that name was reportedly being published in 1899 and 1903.[4] Horatio Bottomley, an MP for the Liberal Party, became the publisher of the magazine on 12 May 1906. It continued production during the First World War.[5] Howard Cox estimates its sales by August 1914 at in excess of three quarters of a million copies a week.[6] By the end of October 1914 the cover of John Bull was '"boasting that the magazine’s circulation was the largest of any weekly journal in the world"
[...More...]

"John Bull (magazine)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Michael Powell
Michael Latham Powell (30 September 1905 – 19 February 1990) was an English film director, celebrated for his partnership with Emeric Pressburger. Through their production company "The Archers", they together wrote, produced and directed a series of classic British films, notably 49th Parallel (1941), The Life and Death of Colonel Blimp (1943), A Matter of Life and Death (1946, also called Stairway to Heaven), Black Narcissus
Black Narcissus
(1947), The Red Shoes (1948), and The Tales of Hoffmann (1951). His later controversial 1960 film Peeping Tom, while today considered a classic, and a contender as the first "slasher", was so vilified on first release that his career was seriously damaged.[1][2][3] Many film-makers such as Martin Scorsese, Francis Ford Coppola
Francis Ford Coppola
and George A. Romero
George A

[...More...]

"Michael Powell" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Peeping Tom (film)
Peeping Tom
Peeping Tom
is a 1960 British psychological thriller and horror film directed by Michael Powell, written by Leo Marks, and starring Carl Boehm, Anna Massey, and Moira Shearer. The film revolves around a serial killer who murders women while using a portable movie camera to record their dying expressions of terror. Its title derives from the slang expression 'Peeping Tom', which describes a voyeur. The film's controversial subject matter and its extremely harsh reception by critics had a severely negative impact on Powell's career as a director in the United Kingdom. However, it attracted a cult following, and in later years, it has been re-evaluated and is now widely considered a masterpiece,[3][4] and a progenitor of the contemporary slasher film
[...More...]

"Peeping Tom (film)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Alfred Hitchcock
Sir
Sir
Alfred Joseph Hitchcock KBE
KBE
(13 August 1899 – 29 April 1980) was an English film director and producer, widely regarded as one of the most influential filmmakers in the history of cinema. He directed 53 feature films[a] in a career spanning six decades, becoming as well-known as any of his actors thanks to his many interviews, his cameo roles in most of his films, and his hosting of Alfred Hitchcock Presents (1955–1965). Born on the outskirts of London, Hitchcock entered the film industry in 1919 as a title card designer after training as a technical clerk and copy writer for a telegraph-cable company
[...More...]

"Alfred Hitchcock" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

International Standard Name Identifier
The International Standard Name Identifier (ISNI) is an identifier for uniquely identifying the public identities of contributors to media content such as books, television programmes, and newspaper articles. Such an identifier consists of 16 digits. It can optionally be displayed as divided into four blocks. It was developed under the auspices of the International Organization for Standardization (ISO) as Draft International Standard 27729; the valid standard was published on 15 March 2012
[...More...]

"International Standard Name Identifier" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse
.