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C/1874 H1
C/1874 H1
C/1874 H1
(Coggia) is a famous non-periodic comet, which in the summer of 1874 could be seen by naked eye observation. On the basis of its brightness, the comet has been called the Great Comet
Comet
of 1874; on July 13 the magnitude of the brightness was between 0 and 1.[2]Contents1 Discovery and observations 2 Undulations in the tail 3 Scientific analysis 4 Orbit 5 Comet
Comet
of 1874 in literature 6 References 7 External linksDiscovery and observations[edit] The astronomer Jérôme Eugène Coggia discovered this comet on 17 April 1874 at the Marseille Observatory. During the remainder of April and in May the comet was closely observed by many astronomers, including Winnecke in Straßburg, Tempel in Arcetri, Rayet in Paris, Schulhof in Vienna, Rümker in Hamburg, Schmidt in Athens, Bruhns in Leipzig, Christie in Greenwich
Greenwich
and Dreyer in Copenhagen
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International Standard Book Number
The International Standard Book
Book
Number (ISBN) is a numeric commercial book identifier which is intended to be unique.[a][b] Publishers purchase ISBNs from an affiliate of the International ISBN Agency.[1] An ISBN is assigned to each separate edition and variation (except reprintings) of a publication. For example, an e-book, a paperback and a hardcover edition of the same book will each have a different ISBN. The ISBN is ten digits long if assigned before 2007, and thirteen digits long if assigned on or after 1 January 2007. The method of assigning an ISBN is nation-specific and varies between countries, often depending on how large the publishing industry is within a country. The initial ISBN identification format was devised in 1967, based upon the 9-digit Standard Book
Book
Numbering (SBN) created in 1966
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Córdoba, Argentina
Córdoba (Spanish pronunciation: [ˈkorðoβa]) is a city in the geographical center of Argentina, in the foothills of the Sierras Chicas on the Suquía
Suquía
River, about 700 km (435 mi) northwest of the Buenos Aires. It is the capital of Córdoba Province and the second most populous city in Argentina
Argentina
after Buenos Aires, with about 1,330,023 inhabitants according to the 2010 census. It was founded on 6 July 1573 by Jerónimo Luis de Cabrera, who named it after Córdoba, Spain. It was one of the first Spanish colonial capitals of the region that is now Argentina
Argentina
(the oldest city is Santiago
Santiago
del Estero, founded in 1553). The National University of Córdoba
National University of Córdoba
is the oldest university of the country and the seventh to be inaugurated in Spanish America. It was founded in 1613 by the Jesuit Order
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Greenwich
Greenwich[note 1] is an area of south east London, England, located 5.5 miles (8.9 km) east-southeast of Charing Cross. It is located within the Royal Borough of Greenwich, to which it lends its name. Greenwich
Greenwich
is notable for its maritime history and for giving its name to the Greenwich Meridian
Greenwich Meridian
(0° longitude) and Greenwich
Greenwich
Mean Time. The town became the site of a royal palace, the Palace of Placentia
Palace of Placentia
from the 15th century, and was the birthplace of many Tudors, including Henry VIII and Elizabeth I
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John Louis Emil Dreyer
John Louis Emil Dreyer
John Louis Emil Dreyer
(February 13, 1852 – September 14, 1926) was a Danish-Irish astronomer.[1][2]Contents1 Life 2 Works 3 References 4 External linksLife[edit] He was born in Copenhagen. His father, Lieutenant General John Christopher Dreyer,[3] was the Danish Minister for War and the Navy. When he was 14 he became interested in astronomy and regularly visited Hans Schjellerup at the Copenhagen
Copenhagen
observatory.[4] He was educated in Copenhagen
Copenhagen
but in 1874, at the age of 22, he went to Parsonstown, Ireland. There he worked as the assistant of Lord Rosse (the son and successor of the Lord Rosse who built the Leviathan of Parsonstown telescope). During 1878 he moved to Dunsink, the site of the Trinity College Observatory of Dublin University to work for Robert Stawell Ball
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Copenhagen
Copenhagener [3]Time zone CET (UTC+1) • Summer (DST) CEST (UTC+2)Postal code 1050–1778, 2100, 2150, 2200, 2300, 2400, 2450, 2500Area code(s) (+45) 3Website www.kk.dkCopenhagen[a] (Danish: København [købm̩ˈhɑwˀn] ( listen); Latin: Hafnia) is the capital and most populous city of Denmark. The city has a population of 775,033 (as of January 2018[update]), of whom 613,288 live in the Municipality of Copenhagen.[6][7] Copenhagen
Copenhagen
is situated on the eastern coast of the island of Zealand; another small portion of the city is located on Amager, and is separated from Malmö, Sweden, by the strait of Øresund
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Robert L. J. Ellery
Robert Lewis John Ellery CMG (14 July 1827 – 14 January 1908) was an English-Australian astronomer and public servant; Victorian government astronomer for 42 years.Contents1 Early life 2 Career 3 Later life 4 References 5 BibliographyEarly life[edit] Ellery was born in Cranleigh, Surrey, England, the son of John Ellery, a surgeon, and his wife Caroline, née Potter. Ellery was educated at the local grammar school and qualified as a medical practitioner, but he had an early interest in astronomy. Friends at Greenwich Observatory encouraged him and he had some access to instruments there. Career[edit] Ellery sailed for Victoria in 1851 attracted by the discovery of gold, and is stated to have practised as a physician at Williamstown, Victoria
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Australia
Coordinates: 25°S 133°E / 25°S 133°E / -25; 133Commonwealth of Australia Flag Coat of arms Anthem: Advance Australia
Australia
Fair[N 1] Commonwealth of Australia, including the Australian territorial claim in the AntarcticCapitalCanberra35°18′29″S 149°07′28″E / 35.30806°S 149.12444°E / -35.30806; 149.12444Largest citySydneyNational languageEnglish[N 2]Religion (2016)[3] Various 52%
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Henry Chamberlain Russell
Henry Chamberlain Russell, CMG, FRS, (17 March 1836 – 22 February 1907) was an Australian astronomer and meteorologist.Contents1 Early life 2 Sydney Observatory 3 Meteorology
Meteorology
career 4 Family 5 Legacy 6 ReferencesEarly life[edit] Russell was born at West Maitland, New South Wales, the fourth son of the Hon. Bourn Russell and his wife Jane, née Mackreth. Russell was educated at West Maitland
West Maitland
Grammar school and the University of Sydney, (BA, 1859).[1][2] Sydney Observatory[edit] Russell joined the staff of the Sydney Observatory
Sydney Observatory
under William Scott who resigned in 1862. Russell then became acting director until 1864 until the new government astronomer, George Smalley, was appointed
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John Tebbutt
John Tebbutt
John Tebbutt
(25 May 1834 – 29 November 1916) was an Australian astronomer, famous for discovering the "Great Comet of 1861". John Tebbutt
John Tebbutt
at his observatory in 1915Contents1 Early life 2 Career 3 Observatory 4 References 5 External linksEarly life[edit] Tebbutt was born at Windsor, New South Wales, the only son of John Tebbutt, then a prosperous store keeper. His grandfather, John Tebbutt, was one of the early settlers in Australia; he arrived at Sydney about the end of 1801. Tebbutt was educated first at the Church of England parish school, then at a private school kept by the Rev. Mathew Adam of the local Presbyterian church, and finally at a small but excellent school under the Rev. Henry Tarlton Stiles, where he had a sound training in Latin. Career[edit] In 1845 Tebbutt's father purchased a tract of land at the eastern end of the town of Windsor known as the peninsula, and built a residence there
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Windsor, New South Wales
Windsor is a town lying North-West of Sydney, New South Wales, Australia. Windsor is located in the local government area of the City of Hawkesbury. It sits on the Hawkesbury River, on the north-western outskirts of the Sydney
Sydney
metropolitan area. At the 2011 census, Windsor had a population of 1,803.[1]Contents1 History1.1 Heritage2 Demography 3 Geography 4 Transport 5 Media 6 See also 7 References 8 External linksHistory[edit] Prior to European settlement, the area was inhabited by the Dharuk Nation of Aboriginal peoples. Windsor is the third-oldest place of British settlement on the Australian continent. Settlement at the location was first established about 1791, near the head of navigation on the Hawkesbury River
Hawkesbury River
(known as Deerubbin in Dharuk) and taking advantage of the fertile river flats for agriculture. The area was originally called Green Hills, but renamed Windsor (after Windsor in England)
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John M. Thome
John Macon Thome (August 22, 1843 – September 27, 1908) was an American-Argentine astronomer. Some sources say John Macom Thome. He is sometimes known as Juan M. Thome. He was born in Palmyra, Pennsylvania
Palmyra, Pennsylvania
and attended Lehigh University. He came to the Argentine National Observatory (today Observatorio Astronómico de Córdoba) in 1870, working as the senior assistant of the director Benjamin A. Gould. He succeeded Gould as director in 1885. Under his initiative, the Cordoba Durchmusterung star catalogue began to be compiled in 1892, although he did not live to see its completion. He won the Lalande Prize for astronomy from the French Academy of Sciences in 1901.[1] Thome died in Córdoba and was succeeded as director of the observatory by Charles Dillon Perrine. References[edit]^ "Séance du 16 décembre". Le Moniteur scientifique du Doctor Quesneville: 147
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Étienne Léopold Trouvelot
Étienne Léopold Trouvelot (December 26, 1827 – April 22, 1895) was a French artist, astronomer and amateur entomologist.[1][2] He is noted for the import and release of the gypsy moth into North America, the spread of the moths as an invasive species has resulted in the destruction of millions of hardwood trees throughout the eastern United States.Contents1 Biography 2 Awards and honors 3 See also 4 Gallery 5 References 6 External linksBiography[edit] Trouvelot was born at Aisne, France. During his early years he was apparently involved in politics and had republican leanings.[citation needed] Following a coup d'état by Louis Napoleon in 1852, he fled with his family to the United States. They settled in the town of Medford, Massachusetts, a suburb of Boston, at the address of 27 Myrtle St. There he supported himself and his family as an artist and astronomer.[3] Trouvelot had an interest as an amateur entomologist
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Provisional Designation In Astronomy
Provisional designation in astronomy is the naming convention applied to astronomical objects immediately following their discovery. The provisional designation is usually superseded by a permanent designation once a reliable orbit has been calculated
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Gamma Ursae Minoris
Gamma Ursae Minoris
Gamma Ursae Minoris
(γ Ursae Minoris, abbreviated Gamma UMi, γ UMi), also named Pherkad,[10] is a star in the northern circumpolar constellation of Ursa Minor. Together with Beta Ursae Minoris (Kochab), it forms the end of the dipper pan of the "Little Dipper", which is an asterism forming the tail of the bear. Based upon parallax measurements obtained during the Hipparcos
Hipparcos
mission, it is approximately 487 light-years (149 parsecs) from the Sun.[1]Contents1 Nomenclature 2 Properties 3 Pherkad in fiction 4 ReferencesNomenclature[edit] γ Ursae Minoris (Latinised to Gamma Ursae Minoris) is the star's Bayer designation. The fainter 11 Ursae Minoris has been called γ¹ Ursae Minoris, in which case Gamma Ursae Minoris
Gamma Ursae Minoris
would be designated γ²
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William Huggins
Sir William Huggins, OM, KCB, PRS (7 February 1824 – 12 May 1910) was an English astronomer best known for his pioneering work in astronomical spectroscopy together with his wife Margaret Lindsay Huggins.[1]Contents1 Biography 2 Honours and awards 3 Publications 4 See also 5 References 6 External linksBiography[edit] William Huggins
William Huggins
(1910) William Huggins
William Huggins
was born at Cornhill, Middlesex, in 1824. In 1875, he married Margaret Lindsay, daughter of John Murray of Dublin, who also had an interest in astronomy and scientific research.[2] She encouraged her husband's photography and helped to put their research on a systematic footing. Huggins built a private observatory at 90 Upper Tulse Hill, London, from where he and his wife carried out extensive observations of the spectral emission lines and absorption lines of various celestial objects
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