HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff

picture info

Business Network
A business network is a complex network of companies, working together to accomplish certain goals.[1] Several descriptions of business networks stipulate different types of characteristics:"A business network is far more than the business itself. As we have seen, it incorporates suppliers, customers, third-party developers, distributors, and others
[...More...]

List Of Industry Trade Groups In The United States
This is a list of notable industry trade groups in the United States.Contents1 National1.1 Advertising, business, marketing 1.2 Agriculture 1.3 Clothing, apparel, footwear, fashion 1.4 Energy 1.5 Entertainment and leisure 1.6 Financial, insurance 1.7 Food 1.8 Construction 1.9 Industry 1.10 IT, communications and electronics 1.11 Media 1.12 Medicine, medical devices, pharmaceuticals and environment 1.13 Tobacco, alcohol, law, politics, gambling and firearms 1.14 Transport and logistics2 State and local2.1 Media 2.2 Other3 ReferencesNational[edit] Advertising, business, marketing[edit]Ad 2 AMC Institute American Advertising Federation American Association of Advertising Agencies American Independent Business Alliance American Marketing Association Association for Convention Operations Management Association for Information and Image Management Association of Chamber of Commerce Executives Association of National Advertisers Center f
[...More...]

picture info

David Ford (marketing Scientist)
David[a] is described in the Hebrew Bible
Hebrew Bible
as the second king of the United Kingdom of Israel and Judah. In the biblical narrative, David
David
is a young shepherd who first gains fame as a musician and later by killing Goliath. He becomes a favorite of King Saul
Saul
and a close friend of Saul's son Jonathan. Worried that David
David
is trying to take his throne, Saul
Saul
turns on David. After Saul and Jonathan are killed in battle, David
David
is anointed as King. David conquers Jerusalem, taking the Ark of the Covenant
Ark of the Covenant
into the city, and establishing the kingdom founded by Saul
[...More...]

Real Estate Hegemony
The Real Estate Hegemony (Chinese: 地產霸權; Jyutping: dei6 caan2 baa3 kyun4) is a term in Hong Kong
Hong Kong
refers to the oligarchy of the real estate conglomerates and the government-business collusion. It refers to the phenomenon of the oligarchy in the land development business, which was dominated by the property tycoons, such as the seven major land development companies, the Cheung Kong Holdings
Cheung Kong Holdings
owned by Li Ka-shing, Sun Hung Kai Properties
Sun Hung Kai Properties
owned by the Kwok family, Henderson Land Development Company owned by Lee Shau-kee
Lee Shau-kee
and the New World Development Company owned by Cheng Yu-tung among others. The companies had enormous power and influence in the Hong Kong
Hong Kong
SAR government and its policy making
[...More...]

Industrial Marketing
Industrial marketing (or business-to-business marketing) is the marketing of goods and services by one business to another. Industrial goods are those an industry uses to produce an end product from one or more raw materials. The term, industrial marketing has largely been replaced by the term B2B marketing (i.e. business to business marketing).Contents1 Origins and usage 2 Industrial, or business-to-business (B2B) marketing 3 Blurring between B2B and B2C 4 Competitive tendering 5 Bidding process 6 Non-tender purchasing 7 Solution selling 8 From cannon fodder to preferred tenderer 9 Indicators 10 The Internet and B2B marketing 11 See also 12 ReferencesOrigins and usage[edit] Historically, the marketing discipline made a distinction between industrial marketing and consumer goods marketing. During the 1980s, businesses shifted from industrial marketing to business marketing. Within a decade, ther term business marketing had largely displaced industrial marketing
[...More...]

picture info

Special
Special
Special
or the specials or variation, may refer to:.mw-parser-output .tocright float:right;clear:right;width:auto;background:none;padding:.5em 0 .8em 1.4em;margin-bottom:.5em .mw-parser-output .tocright-clear-left clear:left .mw-parser-output .tocright-clear-both clear:both .mw-parser-output .tocright-clear-none clear:none Contents1 Policing 2 Literature 3 Film and television 4 Music4.1 Albums 4.2 Songs5 Computing 6 Other uses 7 See alsoPolicing[edit] Specials, Ulster
[...More...]

picture info

Network Marketing
Multi-level marketing
Multi-level marketing
(MLM) also called pyramid selling,[1][2] network marketing,[2][3] and referral marketing,[4] is a marketing strategy for the sale of products or services where the revenue of the MLM company is derived from a non-salaried workforce (also called participants, and variously known as "salespeople", "distributors", "consultants", "promoters", "independent business owners", etc.) selling the company's products/services, while the earnings of the participants are derived from a pyramid-shaped commission system. Although each MLM company dictates its own specific "compensation plan" for the payout of any earnings to their respective participants, the common feature which is found across all MLMs is that the compensation plans theoretically pay out to participants only from the two potential revenue streams
[...More...]

Snehota, Ivan
Ivan Snehota (born 1946) is an Italian organizational theorist, consultant, and Professor of Marketing at the Faculty of Communication Sciences of the University of Lugano, known for his work in the field of business networks with Håkan Håkansson and others.[1][2]Contents1 Biography 2 Selected publications 3 References 4 External linksBiography[edit] Snehota obtained his PhD in Business Administration at the University of Uppsala in 1990 with the thesis, entitled "Notes on a Theory of Business Enterprise."[3] Snehota started his academic career as lecturer at the University of Uppsala from 1971 to 1979. After his graduation he returned to Italy, where he worked in industry in management positions and as management consultant until 1990
[...More...]

Peter Naudé
Peter Naudé (born 1950s) is a British organizational theorist and Professor of Marketing at the Manchester Business School, known for his work on business networks.[1]Contents1 Life and work 2 Selected publications 3 References 4 External linksLife and work[edit] Naudé obtained his Phd in Marketing 1992 at the Manchester Business School. In the 1980s Naude had started his academic career at the University of Cape Town, where he taught at its Graduate School of Business until 1988, when he joined the University of Manchester for his graduate study. After his graduation he continued to lecture at the Manchester Business School until 1999
[...More...]

Lars-Erik Gadde
Lars-Erik Gadde (born 1945) is a Swedish organizational theorist and Professor of Technology Management and Economics at Chalmers University of Technology in Gothenburg, Sweden. He is known for his work on business networks, professional purchasing.[1] and case study research.[2]Contents1 Life and work 2 Selected publications 3 References 4 External linksLife and work[edit] Gadde obtained his PhD at the University of Gothenburg
University of Gothenburg
in 1978 with the thesis, entitled "Efterfrågevariationer i vertikala marknadssystem" (Demand variations in vertical marketing systems). After his graduation Gadde spend his academic career at the Institute for Management of Innovation and Technology, Gothenburg, which became Chalmers University of Technology
Chalmers University of Technology
in 1994
[...More...]

picture info

Cartel
A cartel is a group of apparently independent producers whose goal is to increase their collective profits by means of price fixing, limiting supply, or other restrictive practices. Cartels typically control selling prices, but some are organized to force down the prices of purchased inputs. Antitrust laws attempt to deter or forbid cartels. A single entity that holds a monopoly by this definition cannot be a cartel, though it may be guilty of abusing said monopoly in other ways. Cartels usually arise in oligopolies—industries with a small number of sellers—and usually involve homogeneous products. In general, cartels can be divided into domestic and international agreements.[1] Export cartels constitute a special case of international cartels
[...More...]

Consumer Organization
Consumer
Consumer
organizations are advocacy groups that seek to protect people from corporate abuse like unsafe products, predatory lending, false advertising, astroturfing and pollution. Consumer
Consumer
organizations may operate via protests, litigation, campaigning, or lobbying. They may engage in single-issue advocacy (e.g., the British Campaign for Real Ale
Campaign for Real Ale
(CAMRA), which campaigned against keg beer and for cask ale)[1] or they may set themselves up as more general consumer watchdogs, such as the Consumers' Association in the UK. One common means of providing consumers useful information is the independent comparative survey or test of products or services, involving different manufacturers or companies (e.g., Which?, Consumer Reports, etcetera). Another arena where consumer organizations have operated is food safety
[...More...]

picture info

Chaebol
A chaebol (/ˈtʃeɪbɒl/,[1] /ˈdʒɛbəl/;[2] Korean: [tɕɛ̝.bʌl] ( listen)) is a large industrial conglomerate that is run and controlled by an owner or family in South Korea.[2] A chaebol often consists of a large number of diversified affiliates, controlled by an owner whose power over the group often exceeds legal authority.[3] The term is often used in a context similar to that of the English word "conglomerate".[citation needed] The term was first used in English in 1984.[2] There are several dozen large South Korean family-controlled corporate groups that fall under this definition. The chaebol have also played a significant role in South Korean politics. In 1988, a member of a chaebol family, Chung Mong-joon, president of Hyundai
Hyundai
Heavy Industries, successfully ran for the National Assembly of South Korea. Other business leaders also were chosen to be members of the National Assembly through proportional representation
[...More...]

picture info

Trade Union
A trade union or trades union, also called a labour union (Canada) or labor union (US), is an organization of workers who have come together to achieve common goals; such as protecting the integrity of its trade, improving safety standards, and attaining better wages, benefits (such as vacation, health care, and retirement), and working conditions through the increased bargaining power wielded by the creation of a monopoly of the workers.[1] The trade union, through its leadership, bargains with the employer on behalf of union members (rank and file members) and negotiates labour contracts (collective bargaining) with employers
[...More...]

picture info

Zaibatsu
Zaibatsu
Zaibatsu
(豪商, "financial clique") is a Japanese term referring to industrial and financial business conglomerates in the Empire of Japan, whose influence and size allowed control over significant parts of the Japanese economy
Japanese economy
from the Meiji period
Meiji period
until the end of World War II.Contents1 Terminology 2 Significance 3 History and development3.1 Big Four 3.2 New zaibatsu 3.3 Postwar dissolution 3.4 Modern-day influence4 List of zaibatsu 5 Popular culture 6 See also 7 References7.1 Notes 7.2 Bibliography8 External linksTerminology[edit] The term "zaibatsu" was coined in 19th century Japan
Japan
from the Sino-Japanese roots zai 財 ("wealth", from Middle Chinese
Middle Chinese
dzoi) and batsu 閥 ("clique", "group", from Middle Chinese
Middle Chinese
bjot)
[...More...]

Xi (business)
Xi (Chinese: 系) is a form of business organization in China where a group of companies are controlled by a private equity fund forming an investment group.[1] Definition[edit] The term can be translated as business group or conglomerate.[2] However there is a connotation in the term of bending the rules since the companies in the group while tracing to an owner are not affiliated as a neatly organized entity.[1] In a dissertation on the subject a Xiamen University
Xiamen University
student described the arrangement as follows:"Very often strings of dysfunctional subsidiaries or intricately affiliated companies in the form “business groups” perform no substantial business activities other than acting merely as financial vehicles for one another
[...More...]

.