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Buses
A BUS (archaically also OMNIBUS, MULTIBUS, MOTORBUS, AUTOBUS) is a road vehicle designed to carry many passengers . Buses can have a capacity as high as 300 passengers. The most common type of bus is the single-decker rigid bus , with larger loads carried by double-decker and articulated buses , and smaller loads carried by midibuses and minibuses ; coaches are used for longer-distance services. Many types of buses, such as city transit buses and inter-city coaches, charge a fare. Other types, such as elementary or secondary school buses or shuttle buses within a post-secondary education campus do not charge a fare. In many jurisdictions, bus drivers require a special licence above and beyond a regular driver\'s licence
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Passenger
A PASSENGER (also abbreviated as PAX ) is a person who travels in a vehicle but bears little or no responsibility for the tasks required for that vehicle to arrive at its destination or otherwise operate the vehicle. Passengers are people who ride on buses , passenger trains , airliners , ships , ferryboats , and other methods of transportation. Historically, the concept of the passenger has existed for as long as man has been able to create means of transportation capable of carrying more people than were needed to operate the vessel. Crew members (if any), as well as the driver or pilot of the vehicle, are usually not considered to be passengers
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Internal Combustion Engine
An INTERNAL COMBUSTION ENGINE (ICE) is a heat engine where the combustion of a fuel occurs with an oxidizer (usually air) in a combustion chamber that is an integral part of the working fluid flow circuit. In an internal combustion engine the expansion of the high-temperature and high-pressure gases produced by combustion applies direct force to some component of the engine. The force is applied typically to pistons , turbine blades , rotor or a nozzle . This force moves the component over a distance, transforming chemical energy into useful mechanical energy . The first commercially successful internal combustion engine was created by Étienne Lenoir around 1859 and the first modern internal combustion engine was created in 1876 by Nikolaus Otto (see Otto engine )
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Ontario
ONTARIO (/ɒnˈtɛərioʊ/ ( listen ); French: ), one of the 13 provinces and territories of Canada
Canada
, is in east-central Canada
Canada
. It is Canada's most populous province accounting for nearly 40 percent of the country's population, and is the second-largest province in total area. Ontario
Ontario
is fourth-largest in total area when the territories of the Northwest Territories and Nunavut
Nunavut
are included. It is home to the nation's capital city, Ottawa
Ottawa
, and the nation's most populous city, Toronto
Toronto
. Ontario
Ontario
is bordered by the province of Manitoba
Manitoba
to the west, Hudson Bay and James Bay to the north, and Quebec
Quebec
to the east and northeast, and to the south by the U.S
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Toronto
TORONTO (/təˈrɒntoʊ/ ( listen ) tə-RON-toh , locally (help ·info )) is the capital of the Canadian province of Ontario
Ontario
. It is located within the Golden Horseshoe in Southern Ontario
Ontario
on the northern shore of Lake Ontario
Ontario
. With 2,731,571 residents in 2016, it is the largest city in Canada
Canada
and fourth-largest city in North America by population. Also in 2016, the Toronto
Toronto
census metropolitan area (CMA), the majority of which is within the Greater Toronto Area (GTA), had a population of 5,928,040, making it Canada’s most populous CMA . A global city , Toronto
Toronto
is a centre of business, finance, arts, and culture, and is recognized as one of the most multicultural and cosmopolitan cities in the world
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Latin
LATIN (Latin: lingua latīna, IPA: ) is a classical language belonging to the Italic branch of the Indo-European languages
Indo-European languages
. The Latin alphabet is derived from the Etruscan and Greek alphabets , and ultimately from the Phoenician alphabet
Phoenician alphabet
. Latin
Latin
was originally spoken in Latium
Latium
, in the Italian Peninsula
Italian Peninsula
. Through the power of the Roman Republic
Roman Republic
, it became the dominant language, initially in Italy and subsequently throughout the Roman Empire . Vulgar Latin developed into the Romance languages
Romance languages
, such as Italian , Portuguese , Spanish , French , and Romanian
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Nantes
1 French Land Register data, which excludes lakes, ponds, glaciers > 1 km² (0.386 sq mi or 247 acres) and river estuaries. 2 Population without double counting : residents of multiple communes (e.g., students and military personnel) only counted once. NANTES ( ( listen )) (Gallo : Naunnt or Nantt (pronounced or ); Breton : Naoned (pronounced ) ) is a city in western France on the Loire River , 50 km (31 mi) from the Atlantic coast. The city is the sixth-largest in France , with a population of nearly 300,000 in Nantes and an urban area of 600,000 inhabitants. With Saint-Nazaire , a seaport on the Loire estuary, Nantes forms the main north-western French metropolis. It is the administrative seat of the Loire-Atlantique département and the Pays de la Loire région , one of 18 regions of France
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Bus (other)
A BUS is a vehicle designed to carry passengers. BUS, BUş, BUš, or BUS may also refer to: CONTENTS * 1 People * 2 Places * 3 Science and technology * 4 Other uses * 5 See also PEOPLE * Laurențiu Buș (born 1987), Romanian footballer * Sergiu Buș (born 1992), Romanian footballer, brother of Laurenţiu Buş * James Bus
Bus
Cook , nickname of sports agent * Schelte J
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Globalisation
GLOBALIZATION (or GLOBALISATION; see spelling differences ) refers to the free movement of goods, capital, services, people, technology and information. It is the action or procedure of international integration of countries arising from the convergence of world views , products, ideas, and other aspects of culture . Advances in the means of transport (such as the steam locomotive , steamship , jet engine , and container ships ) and in telecommunications infrastructure (including the rise of the telegraph and its modern offspring, the Internet and mobile phones ) have been major factors in globalization, generating further interdependence of economic and cultural activities. Though many scholars place the origins of globalization in modern times , others trace its history long before the European Age of Discovery and voyages to the New World , some even to the third millennium BC. Large-scale globalization began in the 1820s
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Clipping (morphology)
In linguistics , CLIPPING is the word formation process which consists in the reduction of a word to one of its parts (Marchand: 1969). Clipping is also known as "truncation" or "shortening." According to Marchand (1969), clippings are not coined as words belonging to the standard vocabulary of a language. They originate as terms of a special group like schools, army, police, the medical profession, etc., in the intimacy of a milieu where a hint is sufficient to indicate the whole. For example, exam(ination), math(ematics), and lab(oratory) originated in school slang ; spec(ulation) and tick(et = credit) in stock-exchange slang; and vet(eran) and cap(tain) in army slang. Clipped forms can pass into common usage when they are widely useful, becoming part of standard English, which most speakers would agree has happened with math/maths, lab, exam, phone (from telephone), fridge (from refrigerator), and various others
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Amédée Bollée
AMéDéE-ERNEST BOLLéE (11 January 1844 – 20 January 1917) was a French bellfounder and inventor who specialized in steam cars . After 1867 he was known as "Amédée père" to distinguish him from his similarly named son, Amédée-Ernest-Marie Bollée (1867–1926). CONTENTS * 1 Biography * 2 Steam vehicles * 2.1 L\'Obéissante * 2.2 La Mancelle * 2.3 Marie-Anne * 2.4 La Rapide * 3 See also * 4 References * 5 External links BIOGRAPHYBollée was the eldest son of Ernest-Sylvain Bollée, a bellfounder and inventor who moved to Le Mans
Le Mans
in 1842. He became seriously ill in the 1860s and was obliged to delegate the day-to-day running of his businesses to his three sons. Amédée-Ernest was given charge of the bell foundry, while Ernest-Jules (1846–1922) supervised the hydraulic ram business and the youngest son, Auguste-Sylvain Bollée (1847–1906) assumed control of the Éolienne Bollée wind-turbine factory
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Turnpike Trusts
TURNPIKE TRUSTS were bodies set up by individual acts of Parliament , with powers to collect road tolls for maintaining the principal roads in Britain from the 17th but especially during the 18th and 19th centuries. At the peak, in the 1830s, over 1,000 trusts administered around 30,000 miles (48,000 km) of TURNPIKE ROAD in England and Wales, taking tolls at almost 8,000 toll-gates and side-bars. During the early 19th century the concept of the turnpike trust was adopted and adapted to manage roads within the British Empire (Ireland, Canada, Australia, New Zealand, India and South Africa) and in the United States. Turnpikes declined with the coming of the railways and then the Local Government Act of 1888 gave responsibility for maintaining main roads to county councils and county borough councils
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Locomotive Act
The LOCOMOTIVE ACTS (or RED FLAG ACTS) were a series of Acts of Parliament in the United Kingdom
United Kingdom
regulating the use of mechanically propelled vehicles on British public highways during the latter part of the 19th century. The first three, THE LOCOMOTIVES ON HIGHWAYS ACT 1861, THE LOCOMOTIVE ACT 1865 and the HIGHWAYS AND LOCOMOTIVES (AMENDMENT) ACT 1878, contained restrictive measures on the manning and speed of operation of road vehicles; they also formalised many important road concepts such as vehicle registration, registration plates, speed limits, maximum vehicle weight over structures such as bridges, and the organisation of highway authorities
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Trolley Pole
A TROLLEY POLE is a tapered cylindrical pole of wood or metal , used to transfer electricity from a "live" overhead wire to the control and the electric traction motors of a tram or trolley bus . It is a type of current collector . The use of overhead wire in a system of current collection is reputed to be the 1880 invention of Frank J. Sprague , while the first working trolley pole was developed and demonstrated by Charles Van Depoele , in autumn 1885
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Toll Road
A TOLL ROAD, also known as a TURNPIKE or TOLLWAY, is a public or private roadway for which a fee (or toll ) is assessed for passage. It is a form of road pricing typically implemented to help recoup the cost of road construction and maintenance . Toll roads in some form have existed since antiquity , collecting their fees from passing travellers on foot, wagon or horseback; but their prominence increased with the rise of the automobile , and many modern tollways charge fees for motor vehicles exclusively. The amount of the toll usually varies by vehicle type, weight, or number of axles , with freight trucks often charged higher rates than cars . Tolls are collected at points known as toll booths, toll houses , plazas, stations, bars, or gates. Some toll collection points are unmanned and the user deposits money in a machine which opens the gate once the correct toll has been paid
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