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Buses
A bus (archaically also omnibus,[1] multibus, motorbus, autobus) is a road vehicle designed to carry many passengers. Buses can have a capacity as high as 300 passengers.[2] The most common type of bus is the single-decker rigid bus, with larger loads carried by double-decker and articulated buses, and smaller loads carried by midibuses and minibuses; coaches are used for longer-distance services. Many types of buses, such as city transit buses and inter-city coaches, charge a fare. Other types, such as elementary or secondary school buses or shuttle buses within a post-secondary education campus do not charge a fare
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Overhead Lines
An overhead line or overhead wire is used to transmit electrical energy to trams, trolleybuses or trains. It is known variously as:Overhead contact system (OCS) Overhead line
Overhead line
equipment (OLE or OHLE) Overhead equipment (OHE) Overhead wiring (OHW) or overhead lines (OHL) Catenary Trolley wire Traction wireIn this article, the generic term overhead line is used, as used by the International Union of Railways.[1] An overhead line is designed on the principle of one or more overhead wires (or rails, particularly in tunnels) situated over rail tracks, raised to a high electrical potential by connection to feeder stations at regular intervals
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Stockholm
Stockholm
Stockholm
(/ˈstɒkhoʊm, -hoʊlm/;[8] Swedish pronunciation: [²stɔkːhɔlm] or [²stɔkːɔlm] ( listen))[9] is the capital of Sweden
Sweden
and the most populous city in the Nordic countries;[10][a] 949,761 people live in the municipality,[11] approximately 1.5 million in the urban area,[5] and 2.3 million in the metropolitan area.[3] The city stretches across fourteen islands where Lake Mälaren
Mälaren
flows into the Baltic Sea. Just outside the city and along the coast is the island chain of the Stockholm
Stockholm
archipelago. The area has been settled since the Stone Age, in the 6th millennium BC, and was founded as a city in 1252 by Swedish statesman Birger Jarl. It is also the capital of Stockholm
Stockholm
County. Stockholm
Stockholm
is the cultural, media, political, and economic centre of Sweden
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Internal Combustion Engine
An internal combustion engine (ICE) is a heat engine where the combustion of a fuel occurs with an oxidizer (usually air) in a combustion chamber that is an integral part of the working fluid flow circuit. In an internal combustion engine, the expansion of the high-temperature and high-pressure gases produced by combustion applies direct force to some component of the engine. The force is applied typically to pistons, turbine blades, rotor or a nozzle
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Globalisation
Globalization
Globalization
or globalisation is the trend of increasing interaction between people on a worldwide scale due to advances in transportation and communication technology, nominally beginning with the steamship and the telegraph in the early to mid-1800s. With increased interactions between nation-states and individuals came the growth of international trade, ideas, and culture
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Clipping (morphology)
In linguistics, clipping is the word formation process which consists in the reduction of a word to one of its parts (Marchand: 1969). Clipping is also known as "truncation" or "shortening".[1] According to Marchand (1969),[2] clippings are not coined as words belonging to the standard vocabulary of a language. They originate as terms of a special group like schools, army, police, the medical profession, etc., in the intimacy of a milieu where a hint is sufficient to indicate the whole. For example, exam(ination), math(ematics), and lab(oratory) originated in school slang; spec(ulation) and tick(et = credit) in stock-exchange slang; and vet(eran) and cap(tain) in army slang. Clipped forms can pass into common usage when they are widely useful, becoming part of standard English, which most speakers would agree has happened with math/maths, lab, exam, phone (from telephone), fridge (from refrigerator), and various others
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Nantes
1 French Land Register data, which excludes lakes, ponds, glaciers > 1 km2 (0.386 sq mi or 247 acres) and river estuaries. 2 Population without double counting: residents of multiple communes (e.g., students and military personnel) only counted once. Nantes
Nantes
([nɑ̃t] ( listen)) (Gallo: Naunnt or Nantt (pronounced [nɑ̃t] or [nɑ̃ːt]);[1] Breton: Naoned (pronounced [ˈnɑ̃wnət])[2]) is a city in western France
France
on the Loire
Loire
River, 50 km (31 mi) from the Atlantic coast. The city is the sixth-largest in France, with a population of nearly 300,000 in Nantes
Nantes
and an urban area of 600,000 inhabitants
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Passenger
A passenger (also abbreviated as pax[1]) is a person who travels in a vehicle but bears little or no responsibility for the tasks required for that vehicle to arrive at its destination or otherwise operate the vehicle. Passengers are people who ride on buses, passenger trains, airliners, ships, ferryboats, and other methods of transportation. Historically, the concept of the passenger has existed for as long as man has been able to create means of transportation capable of carrying more people than were needed to operate the vessel. Crew members (if any), as well as the driver or pilot of the vehicle, are usually not considered to be passengers
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Latin
Latin
Latin
(Latin: lingua latīna, IPA: [ˈlɪŋɡʷa laˈtiːna]) is a classical language belonging to the Italic branch of the Indo-European languages. The Latin alphabet
Latin alphabet
is derived from the Etruscan and Greek alphabets, and ultimately from the Phoenician alphabet. Latin
Latin
was originally spoken in Latium, in the Italian Peninsula.[3] Through the power of the Roman Republic, it became the dominant language, initially in Italy and subsequently throughout the Roman Empire. Vulgar Latin
Vulgar Latin
developed into the Romance languages, such as Italian, Portuguese, Spanish, French, and Romanian. Latin, Greek and French have contributed many words to the English language
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Bus (other)
A bus is a vehicle designed to carry passengers. Bus, Buş, Buš, or BUS may also refer to:Contents1 People 2 Places 3 Science and technology 4 Other uses 5 See alsoPeople[edit]Laurențiu Buș (born 1987), Romanian footballer Sergiu Buș (born 1992), Romanian footballer, brother of Laurenţiu Buş James Bus Cook, nickname of sports agent Schelte J
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Amédée Bollée
Amédée-Ernest Bollée (11 January 1844 – 20 January 1917) was a French bellfounder and inventor who specialized in steam cars. After 1867 he was known as "Amédée père" to distinguish him from his similarly named son, Amédée-Ernest-Marie Bollée (1867–1926).Contents1 Biography 2 Steam vehicles2.1 L'Obéissante 2.2 La Mancelle 2.3 Marie-Anne 2.4 La Rapide3 See also 4 References 5 External linksBiography[edit] Bollée was the eldest son of Ernest-Sylvain Bollée, a bellfounder and inventor who moved to Le Mans
Le Mans
in 1842. He became seriously ill in the 1860s and was obliged to delegate the day-to-day running of his businesses to his three sons
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Storstockholms Lokaltrafik
19.269 billion SEK (roughly €1.88 billion)Owner Stockholm County
Stockholm County
CouncilWebsite sle.se/enA commuter train with the SL logotype at Stockholm Central station Storstockholms Lokaltrafik
Storstockholms Lokaltrafik
AB, (Stockholm Public Transport,[1] literally Greater Stockholm Local Transit Company), commonly referred to as SL, is the organisation running all of the land based public transport systems in Stockholm County. SL has its origins in AB Stockholms Spårvägar
AB Stockholms Spårvägar
(SS), a city-owned public transit company which started in 1915 by the City of Stockholm with the aim to deprivatize the two separate private tramway networks into one more efficient company. SS would in the late 1920s also acquire private motorbus companies. The first part of the Stockholm Metro was opened in 1950
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Goldsworthy Gurney
Sir Goldsworthy Gurney
Goldsworthy Gurney
(1793–1875) was a surgeon, chemist, lecturer, consultant, architect, builder and prototypical British gentleman scientist and inventor, of the Victorian era. Amongst many accomplishments, he developed the oxy-hydrogen blowpipe, and later applied its principles to a novel form of illumination, the Bude
Bude
light; developed a series of early steam-powered road vehicles; and laid claim—still discussed and disputed today—to the blastpipe, a key component in the success of steam locomotives, engines, and other coal-fired systems. Events surrounding the failure of his steam vehicle enterprise gave rise to controversy in his time, with considerable polarisation of opinion. His daughter Anna Jane Gurney (1816–1895) was devoted to him
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Toll Road
A toll road, also known as a turnpike or tollway, is a public or private road for which a fee (or toll) is assessed for passage. It is a form of road pricing typically implemented to help recoup the cost of road construction and maintenance. Toll roads have existed in some form since antiquity, with tolls levied on passing travellers on foot, wagon or horseback; but their prominence increased with the rise of the automobile,[citation needed] and many modern tollways charge fees for motor vehicles exclusively. The amount of the toll usually varies by vehicle type, weight, or number of axles, with freight trucks often charged higher rates than cars. Tolls are often collected at toll booths, toll houses, plazas, stations, bars, or gates. Some toll collection points are unmanned and the user deposits money in a machine which opens the gate once the correct toll has been paid
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Turnpike Trusts
Turnpike trusts
Turnpike trusts
were bodies set up by individual acts of Parliament, with powers to collect road tolls for maintaining the principal roads in Britain from the 17th but especially during the 18th and 19th centuries
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Locomotive Act
The Locomotive Acts
Locomotive Acts
(or Red Flag Acts) were a series of Acts of Parliament in the United Kingdom
United Kingdom
regulating the use of mechanically propelled vehicles on British public highways during the latter part of the 19th centu
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