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Bus Station
A bus station is a structure where city or intercity buses stop to pick up and drop off passengers. While the term bus depot also refers to a bus station, it can also refer to a bus garage. A bus station is larger than a bus stop, which is usually simply a place on the roadside, where buses can stop
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Flensburg
Flensburg (Danish: Flensborg, Low Saxon: Flensborg, North Frisian: Flansborj, South Jutlandic: Flensborre) is an independent town (kreisfreie Stadt) in the north of the German state of Schleswig-Holstein. Flensburg is the centre of the region of Southern Schleswig. After Kiel and Lübeck it is the third largest town in Schleswig-Holstein. In May 1945, Flensburg was the seat of the last government of Nazi Germany, the so-called Flensburg government led by Karl Dönitz, which was in power from 1 May (The announcement of Hitler's death) for one week until German armies surrendered and the town was occupied by Allied troops. The regime was officially dissolved on 23 May. The nearest larger towns are Kiel (86 kilometres (53 miles) south) and Odense in Denmark (92 km (57 mi) northeast)
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Wheelchair
A wheelchair, often abbreviated to just "chair", is a chair with wheels, used when walking is difficult or impossible due to illness, injury, or disability. Wheelchairs come in a wide variety of formats to meet the specific needs of their users. They may include specialized seating adaptions, individualized controls, and may be specific to particular activities, as seen with sports wheelchairs and beach wheelchairs
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Wayback Machine
The Wayback Machine is a digital archive of the World Wide Web, founded by the Internet Archive, a nonprofit organization based in San Francisco. Its founders, Brewster Kahle and Bruce Gilliat developed the Wayback Machine with the intention of providing "universal access to all knowledge" by preserving archived copies of defunct webpages. Since its launch in 2001, over 452 billion pages have been added to the archive
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Ticket (admission)
A ticket is a voucher that indicates that an individual is entitled to admission to an event or establishment such as a theatre, amusement park or tourist attraction, or has a right to travel on a vehicle, such as with an airline ticket, bus ticket or train ticket. An individual typically pays for a ticket, but it may be free of charge. A ticket may serve simply as proof of entitlement or reservation
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Intermodal Passenger Transport
Intermodal passenger transport, also called mixed-mode commuting, involves using two or more modes of transportation in a journey. Mixed-mode commuting is often used to combine the strengths (and offset the weaknesses) of various transportation options. A major goal of modern intermodal passenger transport is to reduce dependence on the automobile as the major mode of ground transportation and increase use of public transport. To assist the traveller various intermodal journey planners such as Rome2rio and Google Transit have been devised to help travellers to plan and schedule their journey. Mixed-mode commuting often centers on one type of rapid transit, such as regional rail, to which low-speed options (i.e. bus, tram, or bicycle) are appended at the beginning or end of the journey. Trains offer quick transit from a suburb into an urban area, where passengers can choose a way to complete the trip
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Helsinki
Helsinki (/ˈhɛlsɪŋki/ or /hɛlˈsɪŋki/; Finnish pronunciation: [ˈhelsiŋki] (About this sound listen); Swedish: Helsingfors; Swedish pronunciation: [helsiŋˈfors] (About this sound listen)) is the capital city and most populous municipality of Finland. Helsinki is the seat of the region of Uusimaa in southern Finland, on the shore of the Gulf of Finland. Helsinki has a population of 642,045, the Helsinki urban area has a population of 1,231,595, and the Helsinki metropolitan area has a population of over 1.4 million, making it the most populous municipality and urban area in Finland
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India
India (Hindi: Bhārat), officially the Republic of India (Hindi: Bhārat Gaṇarājya), is a country in South Asia. It is the seventh-largest country by area, the second-most populous country, and the most populous democracy in the world. Bounded by the Indian Ocean on the south, the Arabian Sea on the southwest, and the Bay of Bengal on the southeast, it shares land borders with Pakistan to the west; China, Nepal, and Bhutan to the north; and Bangladesh and Myanmar to the east
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Chennai
Chennai (/ˈɛnn/ (About this soundlisten); also known as Madras /məˈdrɑːs/ (About this soundlisten) or /-ˈdræs/, the official name until 1996) is the capital of the Indian state of Tamil Nadu. Located on the Coromandel Coast off the Bay of Bengal, it is the biggest cultural, economic and educational centre of south India. According to the 2011 Indian census, it is the sixth-most populous city and fourth-most populous urban agglomeration in India
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Finland
Finland (/ˈfɪnlənd/ (About this sound listen); Finnish: Suomi [suo̯mi] (About this sound listen); Swedish: Finland [ˈfɪnland]), officially the Republic of Finland (Finnish: Suomen tasavalta, Swedish: Republiken Finland) is a sovereign state in Northern Europe. The country has land borders with Sweden to the northwest, Norway to the north, and Russia to the east. To the south is the Gulf of Finland with Estonia on the opposite side. Finland is a Nordic country and, together with Scandinavia, is situated in the geographical region of Fennoscandia. Finland's population is 5.5 million (2016), and the majority of the population is concentrated in the southern region. 88.7% of the population is Finnish and speaks Finnish, a Uralic language unrelated to the Scandinavian languages; next come the Finland-Swedes (5.3%)
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Dunkirk
1---> French Land Register data, which excludes lakes, ponds, glaciers > 1 km2---> (0.386 sq mi or 247 acres) and river estuaries. 2---> Population without double counting: residents of multiple communes (e.g., students and military personnel) only counted once.
Dunkirk (/dʌnˈkɜːrk/ or /ˈdʌnkɜːrk/; French: Dunkerque, pronounced [dœ̃kɛʁk]; Dutch: Duinkerke(n), pronounced [ˈdœyŋkɛr(ə)kə(n)] (About this sound listen)) is a commune in the Nord department in northern France. It lies 10 kilometres (6.2 mi) from the Belgian border
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Interurban
The interurban (or radial railway) is a type of electric railway, with streetcar-like light electric self-propelled railcars which run within and between nearby cities or towns. They were very prevalent in North America between 1900 and 1925 and were used primarily for passenger travel between cities and their surrounding communities. The interurban still exists in Europe, particularly in Switzerland, and Asia. Interurban, as a term, refers to the companies, their infrastructure, and the passenger cars that ran on the rails. The interurban, especially in the United States, in the early 1900s was a valuable cultural institution. Most roads and even town streets were unpaved dirt: deep rutted mud in winter and heavy dust in summer. Transportation was by horse-drawn passenger carriages and freight carts. The interurban provided a new vital and reliable transportation link between the city and countryside regardless of weather
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Heritage Streetcar
Heritage streetcars or heritage trams are a part of the efforts to preserve rail traffic heritage. In addition to preserving street-running rail vehicles, heritage streetcar operations can include upkeep of historic rail infrastructure. Working heritage streetcars are closely related to the growing global heritage railway movement and form a part of the living history of rail transport. As with modern streetcar systems, the vehicles are referred to as trams or tramcars in the United Kingdom, Australasia and certain other places (with tramway being the line or system), but as streetcars or trolleys in North America. The last two terms are often used interchangeably in the United States, with trolley being preferred in the eastern US and streetcar in Canada and the western US. In parts of the United States, internally powered buses made to resemble a streetcar are often referred to—inaccurately—as "trolleys"
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Trolleybus
A trolleybus (also known as trolley bus, trolley coach, trackless trolley, trackless tram [in early years] or trolley) is an electric bus that draws power from overhead wires (generally suspended from roadside posts) using spring-loaded trolley poles. Two wires and poles are required to complete the electrical circuit. This differs from a tram or streetcar, which normally uses the track as the return path, needing only one wire and one pole (or pantograph). They are also distinct from other kinds of electric buses, which usually rely on batteries
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Rail Transport
Rolling stock in a rail transport system generally encounters lower frictional resistance than road vehicles, so passenger and freight cars (carriages and wagons) can be coupled into longer trains. The operation is carried out by a railway company, providing transport between train stations or freight customer facilities. Power is provided by locomotives which either draw electric power from a railway electrification system or produce their own power, usually by diesel engines. Most tracks are accompanied by a signalling system. Railways are a safe land transport system when compared to other forms of transport. Railway transport is capable of high levels of passenger and cargo utilization and energy efficiency, but is often less flexible and more capital-intensive than road transport, when lower traffic levels are considered. The oldest known, man/animal-hauled railways date back to the 6th century BC in Corinth, Greece
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Cable Car (railway)
A cable car (cable tram elsewhere, apart from North America) is a type of cable transportation used for mass transit where rail cars are hauled by a continuously moving cable running at a constant speed. Individual cars stop and start by releasing and gripping this cable as required
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