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Building (other)
A building, or edifice, is a structure with a roof and walls standing more or less permanently in one place, such as a house or factory.[1] Buildings come in a variety of sizes, shapes, and functions, and have been adapted throughout history for a wide number of factors, from building materials available, to weather conditions, land prices, ground conditions, specific uses, and aesthetic reasons. To better understand the term building compare the list of nonbuilding structures. Buildings serve several societal needs – primarily as shelter from weather, security, living space, privacy, to store belongings, and to comfortably live and work. A building as a shelter represents a physical division of the human habitat (a place of comfort and safety) and the outside (a place that at times may be harsh and harmful). Ever since the first cave paintings, buildings have also become objects or canvasses of much artistic expression
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Construction
Construction
Construction
is the process of constructing a building or infrastructure.[1] Construction
Construction
differs from manufacturing in that manufacturing typically involves mass production of similar items without a designated purchaser, while construction typically takes place on location for a known client.[2] Construction
Construction
as an industry comprises six to nine percent of the gross domestic product of developed countries.[3] Construction
Construction
starts with planning, design, and financing; it continues until the project is built and ready for use. Large-scale construction requires collaboration across multiple disciplines. A project manager normally manages the job, and a construction manager, design engineer, construction engineer or architect supervises it
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Russell Sturgis
Russell Sturgis
Russell Sturgis
(/ˈstɜːrdʒɪs/; October 16, 1836 – February 11, 1909) was an American architect and art critic of the 19th and early 20th centuries. He was one of the founders of the Metropolitan Museum of Art in 1870. Sturgis was born in Baltimore County, Maryland. His parents were Russell Sturgis, a New York shipping merchant living temporarily in Baltimore, and Margaret Dawes (Appleton) Sturgis. His paternal grandparents were Thomas Sturgis (1755-1821), who served as a Private in Captain Micah Hamlin's Company, Colonel Simeon Cary's Regiment (1776) and was the younger brother of the merchant Russell Sturgis (1750-1826), and Elizabeth (Jackson) Sturgis (1768-1844))
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Architecture
Architecture
Architecture
is both the process and the product of planning, designing, and constructing buildings or any other structures.[3] Architectural works, in the material form of buildings, are often perceived as cultural symbols and as works of art. Historical civilizations are often identified with their surviving architectural achievements. The term architecture is also used metaphorically to refer to the design of organizations and other abstract concepts
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History Of Architecture
The history of architecture traces the changes in architecture through various traditions, regions, overarching stylistic trends, and dates. The branches of architecture are civil, sacred, naval, military,[1] and landscape architecture.Contents1 Neolithic
Neolithic
architecture 2 Antiquity2.1 Ancient Mesopotamia 2.2 Ancient Egyptian architecture 2.3 Greek architecture 2.4 Roman architecture 2.5 Byzantine architecture 2.6 Persian architecture3 Islamic architecture 4 Africa 5 Southern Asia5.1 Indian architecture 5.2 Buddhist architecture6 Southeast Asia6.1
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Shinichi Fujimura
Shinichi Fujimura (藤村 新一, Fujimura Shin'ichi, b. 4 May 1950) is a Japanese archaeologist who claimed he had found a large number of stone artifacts dating back to the Lower Paleolithic
Lower Paleolithic
and Middle Paleolithic periods. These objects were later revealed to be forgeries.Contents1 Success 2 Criticism 3 Disclosure 4 Aftermath 5 See also 6 References 7 External linksSuccess[edit] Fujimura was born in Kami, Miyagi, in 1950. After graduating from a high school in Sendai, he obtained a job in a manufacturing company. He became intrigued by archaeology when he was a child, finding shards of Jōmon pottery
Jōmon pottery
in the backyard of his house.[1] In 1972 Fujimura began to study archaeology and to look for Paleolithic artifacts during his holidays
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Nice
1 French Land Register data, which excludes lakes, ponds, glaciers > 1 km2 (0.386 sq mi or 247 acres) and river estuaries. 2 Population without double counting: residents of multiple communes (e.g., students and military personnel) only counted once. Nice
Nice
(/niːs/, French pronunciation: ​[nis]; Niçard Occitan: Niça, classical norm, or Nissa, nonstandard, pronounced [ˈnisa]; Italian: Nizza [ˈnittsa]; Greek: Νίκαια; Latin: Nicaea) is the fifth most populous city in France and the capital of the Alpes-Maritimes
Alpes-Maritimes
département
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Terra Amata (archaeological Site)
Terra Amata is an archeological site in open air located on the slopes of Mount Boron in Nice, at a level 26 meters (85 ft) above the current sea level of the Mediterranean. It was discovered and excavated in 1966 by Henry de Lumley. The site, originally on a prehistoric beach, contained tools of the lower Paleolithic
Paleolithic
period, dated to about 400,000 BC, as well as traces of some of the earliest domestication of fire in Europe.[1] The site now lies beneath an apartment building and a museum of prehistoric Nice, where some of the objects discovered are on display.Contents1 Principal discoveries 2 Controversy 3 References 4 External linksPrincipal discoveries[edit] The site was discovered during the construction of a terrace near the port of Nice
Nice
in 1966. After negotiating with the owner of the site, DeLumley was given permission to work on the site from January 28 until July 5, 1966
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Neolithic Architecture
Neolithic
Neolithic
architecture refers to structures encompassing housing and shelter from approximately 10,000 to 2,000 BC, the Neolithic
Neolithic
period. In southwest Asia, Neolithic
Neolithic
cultures appear soon after 10,000 BC, initially in the Levant
Levant
( Pre-Pottery Neolithic A
Pre-Pottery Neolithic A
and Pre-Pottery Neolithic
Neolithic
B) and from there into the east and west. Early Neolithic structures and buildings can be found in southeast Anatolia, Syria, and Iraq by 8,000 BC with agriculture societies first appearing in southeast Europe by 7,000 BC, and central Europe by ca
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List Of Building Types
A list of structural structure types and forms of architecture. For individual buildings, see List of buildings and structures
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Timber Framing
Timber framing
Timber framing
and "post-and-beam" construction are traditional methods of building with heavy timbers, creating structures using squared-off and carefully fitted and joined timbers with joints secured by large wooden pegs. It is commonplace in wooden buildings from the 19th century and earlier. If the structural frame of load-bearing timber is left exposed on the exterior of the building it may be referred to as half-timbered, and in many cases the infill between timbers will be used for decorative effect. The method comes from working directly from logs and tree rather than pre-cut dimensional lumber
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Marburg
Marburg
Marburg
is a university town in the German federal state (Bundesland) of Hesse, capital of the Marburg-Biedenkopf
Marburg-Biedenkopf
district (Landkreis). The town area spreads along the valley of the river Lahn
Lahn
and has a population of approximately 72,000. Having been awarded town privileges in 1222, Marburg
Marburg
served as capital of the landgraviate of Hessen-Marburg
Hessen-Marburg
during periods of the fifteenth to seventeenth centuries. The University of Marburg
University of Marburg
was founded in 1527 and dominates the public life in the town to this day.Contents1 History1.1 Founding and early history 1.2 St
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Home
A home or domicile is a dwelling-place used as a permanent or semi-permanent residence for an individual, family, household or several families in a tribe. It is often a house, apartment, or other building, or alternatively a mobile home, houseboat, yurt or any other portable shelter. A principle of constitutional law in many countries, related to the right to privacy enshrined in article 12 of the Universal Declaration of Human
Human
Rights[1] is the inviolability of the home as an individual's place of shelter and refuge. Homes typically provide areas and facilities for sleeping, preparing food, eating and hygiene. Larger groups may live in a nursing home, children's home, convent or any similar institution
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Mendoza, Argentina
Mendoza (locally [menˈdosa]) is the capital of the province of Mendoza in Argentina. It is located in the northern-central part of the province, in a region of foothills and high plains, on the eastern side of the Andes. As of the 2010 census [INDEC], Mendoza had a population of 115,041 with a metropolitan population of 1,055,679, making Greater Mendoza the fourth largest census metropolitan area in the country. Ruta Nacional 7, the major road running between Buenos Aires
Buenos Aires
and Santiago, runs through Mendoza. The city is a frequent stopover for climbers on their way to Aconcagua
Aconcagua
(the highest mountain in the Western and Southern Hemispheres) and for adventure travelers interested in mountaineering, hiking, horse riding, rafting, and other sports
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Duplex (building)
In North America, a duplex house is a dwelling having apartments with separate entrances for two households
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