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Buenos Aires Central Business District
The Buenos Aires Central Business District is the main commercial centre of Buenos Aires, Argentina, though not an official city ward. While the barrios of Puerto Madero and Retiro house important business complexes and modern high-rise architecture, the area traditionally known as Microcentro (Spanish: Microcenter) is located within San Nicolás and Monserrat, roughly coinciding with the area around the historic center of the Plaza de Mayo. The Microcentro has a wide concentration of offices, service companies and banks, and a large circulation of pedestrians on working days
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Río De La Plata
The Río de la Plata (Spanish pronunciation: [ˈri.o ðe la ˈplata] (listen), lit. "river of silver")—named River Plate in British English and the Commonwealth and La Plata River (occasionally Plata River) in other English-speaking countries—is the estuary formed by the confluence of the Uruguay and the Paraná rivers at Punta Gorda. It empties into the Atlantic Ocean, forming a funnel-shaped indentation on the southeastern coastline of South America
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Mesopotamia, Argentina
La Mesopotamia or Región Mesopotámica is the humid and verdant area of northeast Argentina, comprising the provinces of Misiones, Entre Ríos, and Corrientes.[1] The landscape and its characteristics are dominated by two rivers: the Paraná and the Uruguay.[2] When Spanish settlers came to the area, the two parallel rivers and the lush area between them drew comparisons to Mesopotamia (Greek: Μεσοποταμία "land between rivers") in modern-day Iraq, and it was decided that the Argentine region be named after the Iraqi region
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Paraguay
Coordinates: 23°S 58°W / 23°S 58°W / -23; -58 Average life expectancy in Paraguay is rather high given its poverty: as of 2006, it was 75 years,[103] equivalent to far wealthier Argentina, and the 8th highest in the Americas according to World Health Organization. Public expenditure on health is 2.6% of GDP, while private health expenditure is 5.1%.[99] Infant mortality was 20 per 1,000 births in 2005.[update], it was 75 years,[103] equivalent to far wealthier Argentina, and the 8th highest in the Americas according to World Health Organization
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Pampa
Coordinates: 35°S 62°W / 35°S 62°W / -35; -62 Historically, frequent wildfires ensured that only small plants such as grasses flourished, while trees were less common.[citation needed] The dominant vegetation types are grassy prairie and grass steppe, in which numerous species of the grass genus Stipa are particularly conspicuous. "Pampas grass" (Cortaderia selloana) is an iconic species of the Pampas. Vegetation typically includes perennial grasses and herbs. Different strata of grasses occur because of gradients of water availability. The World Wildlife Fund divides the Pampas into three distinct ecoregions
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Rio De La Plata
The Río de la Plata (Spanish pronunciation: [ˈri.o ðe la ˈplata] (listen), lit. "river of silver")—named River Plate in British English and the Commonwealth and La Plata River (occasionally Plata River) in other English-speaking countries—is the estuary formed by the confluence of the Uruguay and the Paraná rivers at Punta Gorda. It empties into the Atlantic Ocean, forming a funnel-shaped indentation on the southeastern coastline of South America
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English Argentine

English Argentines (also known as Anglo-Argentines) are citizens of Argentina or the children of Argentine citizens brought up in Argentina,[2] who can claim ancestry originating in England. The English settlement in Argentina (the arrival of English emigrants),[3] took place in the period after Argentina's independence from Spain through the 19th century. Unlike many other waves of immigration to Argentina, English immigrants were not usually leaving England because of poverty or persecution, but went to Argentina as industrialists and major landowners.[3] The United Kingdom had a strong economic influence in Argentina during the Victorian period.[4] However the position of English Argentines was complicated when their economic influence was finally eroded by Juan Perón's nationalisation of many British-owned companies in the 1940s and then by the Falklands War in 1982
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