HOME TheInfoList
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff







picture info

Bruno Bauer
Bruno Bauer (German: [baʊɐ]; 6 September 1809 – 13 April 1882) was a German philosopher and theologian. As a student of G. W. F. Hegel, Bauer was a radical Rationalist in philosophy, politics and Biblical criticism. Bauer investigated the sources of the New Testament and, beginning with Hegel's Hellenophile orientation, concluded that early Christianity owed more to ancient Greek philosophy (Stoicism) than to Judaism.[1] Bruno Bauer is also known by his association and sharp break with Karl Marx and Friedrich Engels, and by his later association with Max Stirner and Friedrich Nietzsche. Starting in 1840, he began a series of works arguing that Jesus was a 2nd-century fusion of Jewish, Greek, and Roman theology.[2] Bauer was the son of a painter in a porcelain factory and his wife at Eisenberg in Saxe-Gotha-Altenburg
[...More Info...]      
[...Related Items...]



picture info

Albert Schweitzer

Albert Schweitzer OM (German: [ˈalbɛʁt ˈʃvaɪ̯t͡sɐ] (listen); 14 January 1875 – 4 September 1965) was an Alsatian polymath. He was a theologian, organist, writer, humanitarian, philosopher, and physician. A Lutheran, Schweitzer challenged both the secular view of Jesus as depicted by the historical-critical method current at this time, as well as the traditional Christian view
[...More Info...]      
[...Related Items...]



Pietist
Pietism (/ˈpɪtɪzəm/) is a movement within Lutheranism that combines its emphasis on biblical doctrine with the Reformed emphasis on individual piety and living a vigorous Christian life. Although the movement initially was active exclusively within Lutheranism, it had a tremendous impact on Protestantism worldwide, particularly in North America and Europe. Pietism originated in modern Germany in the late 17th century with the work of Philipp Spener, a Lutheran theologian whose emphasis on personal transformation through spiritual rebirth and renewal, individual devotion, and piety laid the foundations for the movement
[...More Info...]      
[...Related Items...]



picture info

Porcelain
Porcelain (/ˈpɔːrsəlɪn/) is a ceramic material made by heating materials, generally including a material like kaolin, in a kiln to temperatures between 1,200 and 1,400 °C (2,200 and 2,600 °F). The toughness, strength, and translucence of porcelain, relative to other types of pottery, arises mainly from vitrification and the formation of the mineral mullite within the body at these high temperatures. Though definitions vary, porcelain can be divided into three main categories: hard-paste, soft-paste and bone china. The category that an object belongs to depends on the composition of the paste used to make the body of the porcelain object and the firing conditions. Porcelain slowly evolved in China and was finally achieved (depending on the definition used) at some point about 2,000 to 1,200 years ago, then slowly spread to other East Asian countries, and finally Europe and the rest of the world
[...More Info...]      
[...Related Items...]



Philip Marheineke
Philip Konrad Marheineke (May 1, 1780, Hildesheim – May 31, 1846, Berlin), was a German Protestant church leader within the Evangelical Church in Prussia. He was born at Hildesheim, Bishopric of Hildesheim, and studied at the University of Göttingen. In 1805 he was appointed professor extraordinarius of philosophy at Erlangen; in 1807 he moved to Heidelberg. In 1811 he became professor ordinarius at Frederick William University, Berlin, where from 1820 he was also preacher at Trinity Church and worked with Schleiermacher
[...More Info...]      
[...Related Items...]



picture info

Synoptic Gospels
The gospels of Matthew, Mark, and Luke are referred to as the synoptic Gospels because they include many of the same stories, often in a similar sequence and in similar or sometimes identical wording. They stand in contrast to John, whose content is largely distinct. The term synoptic (Latin: synopticus; Greek: συνοπτικός, romanizedsynoptikós) comes via Latin from the Greek σύνοψις, synopsis, i.e
[...More Info...]      
[...Related Items...]



Immanuel Kant

Immanuel Kant (UK: /kænt/,[18][19] US: /kɑːnt/;[20][21] German: [ɪˈmaːnu̯eːl ˈkant, -nu̯ɛl -];[22][23] 22 April 1724 – 12 February 1804) was a German philosopher and one of the central Enlightenment thinkers.[24][25] Kant's comprehensive and systematic works in epistemology, metaphysics, ethics, and aesthetics have made him one of the most influential figures in modern Western philosophy.[24][26] In his doctrine of transcendental idealism, Kant argued that space and time are mere "forms of intuition" which structure all experience, and therefore that while "things-in-themselves" exist and contribute to experience, they are nonetheless distinct from the objects of experience
[...More Info...]      
[...Related Items...]



Marheineke
Philip Konrad Marheineke (May 1, 1780, Hildesheim – May 31, 1846, Berlin), was a German Protestant church leader within the Evangelical Church in Prussia. He was born at Hildesheim, Bishopric of Hildesheim, and studied at the University of Göttingen. In 1805 he was appointed professor extraordinarius of philosophy at Erlangen; in 1807 he moved to Heidelberg. In 1811 he became professor ordinarius at Frederick William University, Berlin, where from 1820 he was also preacher at Trinity Church and worked with Schleiermacher
[...More Info...]      
[...Related Items...]



Biblical Criticism

Biblical criticism was the practice of critical analysis of the Bible that began in the eighteenth century and ended in the twentieth. It was based on two distinguishing perspectives: the scientific concern to avoid dogma and bias by applying a neutral, non-sectarian, reason-based judgment to the study of the Bible, and the belief that reconstructing Bible history would lead to a correct understanding of the text. This foundation set it apart from earlier pre-critical methods, the anti-critical methods of those who oppose critically based study, later post-critical orientation, and the many different types of criticism which biblical criticism spawned in the late twentieth and early twenty-first centuries. Biblical criticism included a wide range of approaches and questions within four major methodologies: textual, source, form, and literary criticism
[...More Info...]      
[...Related Items...]



picture info

Ascetic
Asceticism (/əˈsɛtɪsɪzəm/; from the Greek: ἄσκησις áskesis, "exercise, training") is a lifestyle characterized by abstinence from sensual pleasures, often for the purpose of pursuing spiritual goals
[...More Info...]      
[...Related Items...]