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Brunhilda Of Austrasia
Brunhilda[1] (c. 543–613) was a Queen of Austrasia
Austrasia
by marriage to the Merovingian
Merovingian
King Sigebert I
Sigebert I
of Austrasia, part of Francia. In her long and complicated career she ruled the eastern Frankish kingdoms of Austrasia
Austrasia
and Burgundy for three periods as regent for her son Childebert II
Childebert II
from 575 until 583; her grandson Theudebert II
Theudebert II
from 595 until 599; and great-grandson Sigebert in 613. The period was marked by tension between the royal house and the powerful nobles vying for power. Brunhilda was apparently an efficient ruler, but this and her forceful personality brought her into conflict with her nobles, the church, and the other Merovingians
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Reccared I
Reccared I
Reccared I
(or Recared; Latin: Reccaredus; Spanish: Recaredo; c. 559 – 31 May 601 AD; reigned 586–601) was Visigothic King of Hispania and Septimania. His reign marked a climactic shift in history, with the king's renunciation of Arianism
Arianism
in favour of Catholicism in 587. Reccared was the younger son of King Leovigild
Leovigild
by his first wife Theodosia. Like his father, Reccared had his capital at Toledo. The Visigothic kings and nobles were traditionally Arian Christians, while the Hispano-Roman population were Roman Catholics. The Catholic bishop Leander of Seville
Leander of Seville
was instrumental in converting the elder son and heir of Leovigild, Hermenegild, to Catholicism
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Béarn
Béarn
Béarn
(French pronunciation: ​[be.aʁn]; Gascon: Bearn or Biarn; Basque: Bearno or Biarno; Latin: Benearnia, Bearnia) is one of the traditional provinces of France, located in the Pyrenees
Pyrenees
mountains and in the plain at their feet, in southwest France. Along with the three Basque provinces of Soule, Lower Navarre, and Labourd, the principality of Bidache, as well as small parts of Gascony, it forms in the southwest the current département of Pyrénées-Atlantiques (64). The capitals of Béarn
Béarn
were Beneharnum (until 841), Morlaàs (from ca
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Metz
1 French Land Register data, which excludes lakes, ponds, glaciers > 1 km2 (0.386 sq mi or 247 acres) and river estuaries. 2 Population without double counting: residents of multiple communes (e.g., students and military personnel) only counted once.Part of the series onLorraineFlag of Lorraine
Lorraine
since the 13th centuryHistory
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Chlothar I
Chlothar I
Chlothar I
(c. 497 – 29 November 561),[a] also called "Clotaire I" and the Old (le Vieux), King of the Franks, was one of the four sons of Clovis I
Clovis I
of the Merovingian
Merovingian
dynasty. Chlothar's father, Clovis I, divided the kingdom between his four sons. In 511, Clothar I inherited two large territories on the Western coast of Francia, separated by the lands of his brother Childebert I's Kingdom of Paris. Chlothar spent most of his life in a campaign to expand his territories at the expense of his relatives and neighbouring realms in all directions. His brothers avoided outright war by cooperating with his attacks on neighbouring lands in concert or by invading lands when their rulers died. The spoils were shared between the participating brothers
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Courtesan
A courtesan was originally a courtier, which means a person who attends the court of a monarch or other powerful person.[1] In feudal society, the court was the centre of government as well as the residence of the monarch, and social and political life were often completely mixed together. Prior to the Renaissance, courtesans served to convey information to visiting dignitaries, when servants could not be trusted. In Renaissance
Renaissance
Europe, courtiers played an extremely important role in upper-class society. As it was customary during this time for royal couples to lead separate lives—commonly marrying simply to preserve bloodlines and to secure political alliances—men and women would often seek gratification and companionship from people living at court
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Dower
Dower
Dower
is a provision accorded by law, but traditionally by a husband or his family, to a wife for her support in the event that she should become widowed. It was settled on the bride (being gifted into trust) by agreement at the time of the wedding, or as provided by law. The dower grew out of the Germanic practice of bride price (Old English weotuma), which was given over to a bride's family well in advance for arranging the marriage, but during the early Middle Ages, was given directly to the bride instead. However, in popular parlance, the term may be used for a life interest in property settled by a husband on his wife at any time, not just at the wedding. The verb to dower is sometimes used. In popular usage, the term dower may be confused with:A dowager is a widow (who may receive her dower). The term is especially used of a noble or royal widow who no longer occupies the position she held during the marriage
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Bordeaux
www.bordeaux.frUNESCO World Heritage SiteOfficial name Bordeaux, Port of the MoonCriteria Cultural: ii, ivReference 1256Inscription 2007 (31st Session)Area 1,731 haBuffer zone 11,974 ha1 French Land Register data, which excludes lakes, ponds, glaciers > 1 km2 (0.386 sq mi or 247 acres) and river estuaries. 2 Population without double counting: residents of multiple communes (e.g., students and military personnel) only counted once. Bordeaux
Bordeaux
(French pronunciation: ​[bɔʁdo]; Gascon Occitan: Bordèu) is a port city on the Garonne
Garonne
River in the Gironde
Gironde
department in southwestern France. The municipality (commune) of Bordeaux
Bordeaux
proper has a population of 246,586 (2014)
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Limoges
1 French Land Register data, which excludes lakes, ponds, glaciers > 1 km2 (0.386 sq mi or 247 acres) and river estuaries. 2 Population without double counting: residents of multiple communes (e.g., students and military personnel) only counted once. Limoges
Limoges
(/lɪˈmoʊʒ/;[1] French pronunciation: ​[limɔʒ];[1] Occitan: Lemòtges or Limòtges [liˈmɔdʒes]) is a city and commune, the capital of the Haute-Vienne
Haute-Vienne
department and was the administrative capital of the former Limousin
Limousin
region in west-central France. Limoges
Limoges
is known for its medieval and Renaissance enamels (Limoges enamels) on copper, for its 19th-century porcelain ( Limoges
Limoges
porcelain) and for its oak barrels which are used for Cognac and Bordeaux production
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Cahors
1 French Land Register data, which excludes lakes, ponds, glaciers > 1 km2 (0.386 sq mi or 247 acres) and river estuaries. 2 Population without double counting: residents of multiple communes (e.g., students and military personnel) only counted once. Cahors
Cahors
(French pronunciation: ​[kaɔʁ]; Occitan: Caors [kaˈurs, ˈkɔws, ˈkɔw]) is the capital of the Lot department in south-western France. Its site is dramatic, being contained on three sides within a U-shaped bend in the River Lot known as the presqu'île ("peninsula")
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Tournai
Tournai
Tournai
(French pronunciation: ​[tuʁnɛ]; Latin: Tornacum, Picard: Tornai), known in Dutch as Doornik and historically as Dornick in English, is a Walloon municipality of Belgium, 85 kilometres (53 miles) southwest of Brussels
Brussels
on the river Scheldt
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Soissons
1 French Land Register data, which excludes lakes, ponds, glaciers > 1 km2 (0.386 sq mi or 247 acres) and river estuaries. 2 Population without double counting: residents of multiple communes (e.g., students and military personnel) only counted once. Soissons
Soissons
(French pronunciation: ​[swasɔ̃]) is a commune in the northern French department of Aisne, in the region of Hauts-de-France
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Vitry-en-Artois
1 French Land Register data, which excludes lakes, ponds, glaciers > 1 km2 (0.386 sq mi or 247 acres) and river estuaries. 2 Population without double counting: residents of multiple communes (e.g., students and military personnel) only counted once. Vitry-en-Artois
Vitry-en-Artois
is a commune and in the Pas-de-Calais
Pas-de-Calais
department in the Hauts-de- France
France
region of France.Contents1 Geography 2 History 3 Population 4 Places of interest 5 See also 6 References 7 External linksGeography[edit] Vitry-en-Artois
Vitry-en-Artois
is situated some 12 miles (19.3 km) northeast of Arras, at the junction of the N50, D39 and the D42 roads. The river Scarpe flows through the town, which is also served by the SNCF railway
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Seax
Seax
Seax
( Old English
Old English
pronunciation: [ˈsæɑks]; also sax, sæx, sex; invariant in plural, latinized sachsum) is an
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Rouen
1 French Land Register data, which excludes lakes, ponds, glaciers > 1 km2 (0.386 sq mi or 247 acres) and river estuaries. 2 Population without double counting: residents of multiple communes (e.g., students and military personnel) only counted once. Rouen
Rouen
(French pronunciation: ​[ʁwɑ̃]; Frankish: Rodomo; Latin: Rotomagus, Rothomagus) is a city on the River Seine
Seine
in the north of France. It is the capital of the region of Normandy. Formerly one of the largest and most prosperous cities of medieval Europe, Rouen
Rouen
was the seat of the Exchequer
Exchequer
of Normandy
Normandy
during the Middle Ages
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Prætextatus (Bishop Of Rouen)
Prætextatus or Praetextatus may refer to:Prætextatus (Bishop of Rouen), also known as Saint Prix Vettius Agorius Praetextatus, 4th-century Roman aristocrat Gaius Asinius Lepidus Praetextatus, Roman consul in 242See also[edit]Praetexta, a type of Roman historical dramaThis disambiguation page lists articles about people with the same name
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