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Lal-lo And Gattaran Shell Middens
The Lal-lo and Gattaran Shell Middens are one of the most significant archaeological gastronomic finds in Southeast Asia in the 20th century. The site is located along the banks of the Cagayan River in the province of Cagayan, Philippines. The site, as old as 2000 BC, is highly important due to its archaeological impact on the food resources and human activities of the ancient peoples of the Cagayan Valley. It is currently under consideration as a UNESCO World Heritage Site. Roughly 500 km northeast of Manila, various shell middens can be found that consist of shells of the predominant species Batissa childreni, a freshwater clam, in highest abundance.[1] The middens are of various sizes and ages with the oldest being carbon dated to 2000 BC and youngest to 100 AD.[1] They reside on nearby hilltops and also on the immediate banks of the Cagayan River
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Igorot Society
The most important information in this article (the Igorot society, not the etymology) is completely unsourced and in fact I can't find anything about it. The article was created in 2013 using faux sources (the sources behind the content did not contain the information written in the article at all). A further completely unsourced edit in 2017 created the initial history section. Considering the outlandish claims in this article (see the "start of this society" at 500BC), it can be considered as a hoax article and unworthy of Wikipedia. (proposed by Glennznl)

If you can address this concern by improving, copyediting, sourcing, renaming, or merging the page, please edit this page and do so. You may remove this message if you improve the article or otherwise object to deletion for any reason. Although not required, you are encouraged to explain why you object to the deletion, either in your edit summary or on the talk page
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Manunggul Jar
The Manunggul Jar is a secondary burial jar excavated from a Neolithic burial site in the Manunggul cave of the Tabon Caves at Lipuun Point in Palawan, Philippines. It dates from 890–710 B.C.[2] and the two prominent figures at the top handle of its cover represent the journey of the soul to the afterlife. The Manunggul Jar is widely acknowledged to be one of the finest Philippine pre-colonial artworks ever produced and is considered a masterpiece of Philippine ceramics. It is listed as a national treasure and designated as item 64-MO-74[3] by the National Museum of the Philippines. It is now housed at the National Museum of Anthropology and is one of the most popular exhibits there
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Kalanay Cave
The Kalanay Cave is a small cave located on the island of Masbate in central Philippines. The cave is located specifically at the northwest coast of the island within the municipality of Aroroy. The artifacts recovered from the site were similar to those found to the Sa Huynh culture of Southern Vietnam. The site is part of the "Sa Huynh-Kalanay Interaction Sphere" which was an Iron Age maritime trading network associated with the Austronesian peoples of the Philippines, Vietnam, Taiwan, as well as most of northeastern Borneo and Southern Thailand. The type of pottery found in the site were dated 400 BC to AD 1500.[1][2] The "Sa Huynh-Kalanay Interaction Sphere" is characterized by a remarkable continuity in trade goods, including decorated pottery and double-headed pendants and earrings known as lingling-o.[3] Examination of some pottery from the Carl E
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