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British Columbia Treaty Process
WikiProjectIndigenous North AmericansFirst NationsCommons WiktionaryInuitCommons WiktionaryMétisCommons Wiktionaryv t eThe British Columbia
British Columbia
Treaty Process (BCTP) is a land claims negotiation process started in 1993 to resolve outstanding issues – including claims to un-extinguished Aboriginal rights
Aboriginal rights
– with British Columbia's First Nations. Two treaties have been implemented under the BCTP. The Nisga'a
Nisga'a
Treaty is considered separate from the Treaty Process because those negotiations began before the BC treaty process was started, and it has been called a blueprint for the current process. To represent the interests of First Nations
First Nations
involved with the process, the First Nations Summit was created
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Indigenous Peoples In Quebec
Indigenous peoples in Quebec
Quebec
total 11 distinct ethnic groups. The 10 First Nations
First Nations
and the Inuit
Inuit
communities number 141,915 people and account for approximately 2% of the population of Quebec, Canada.Contents1 Inuit 2 First Nations2.1 Algonquian2.1.1 Abenakis 2.1.2 Atikamekw 2.1.3 Crees 2.1.4 Malecites 2.1.5 Mi'kmaqs 2.1.6 Innus 2.1.7 Naskapis2.2 Iroquoian2.2.1 Wendats 2.2.2 Mohawks3 Recognized rights 4 See also 5 External linksInuit[edit] The Inuit
Inuit
communities of Quebec
Quebec
are located in the northernmost part of the province, in an area known as Nunavik
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Douglas Treaties
The Douglas Treaties, also known as the Vancouver Island Treaties or the Fort Victoria Treaties, were a series of treaties signed between certain indigenous groups on Vancouver Island and the Colony of Vancouver Island.Contents1 Background 2 Treaties 3 Context 4 Treaty Members 5 References 6 Further reading 7 External linksBackground[edit] With the signing of the Oregon Treaty
Oregon Treaty
in 1846, the Hudson's Bay Company (HBC) determined that its trapping rights in the Oregon Territory were tenuous. Thus in 1849, it moved its western headquarters from Fort Vancouver
Fort Vancouver
on the Columbia River
Columbia River
(present day Vancouver, Washington) to Fort Victoria
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First Nations In Manitoba
First Nations
First Nations
in Manitoba constitute of over 130,000 registered people. Of those, about 60% live on reserve. There are 63 First Nations in the Province and five indigenous linguistic groups. The languages are nihi`wawinCree, Ojibwe, Dakota, Oji-Cree
Oji-Cree
and Dene. They are listed by common usage names but other names may be applied in certain areas
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Americanist Phonetic Notation
Americanist phonetic notation, also known as the North American Phonetic Alphabet
Alphabet
or NAPA, is a system of phonetic notation originally developed by European and American anthropologists and language scientists (students of Neogrammarians) for the phonetic and phonemic transcription of indigenous languages of the Americas and for languages of Europe. It is still commonly used by linguists working on, among others, Slavic, Uralic, Semitic languages
Semitic languages
and for the languages of the Caucasus and of India (however, Uralists commonly use a variant known as the Uralic Phonetic Alphabet). The term "Americanist phonetic alphabet" is misleading because it has always been widely used outside the Americas
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Mythologies Of The Indigenous Peoples Of North America
The mythologies of the indigenous peoples of North America comprise many bodies of traditional narratives associated with religion from a mythographical perspective. Indigenous North American belief systems include many sacred narratives. Such spiritual stories are deeply based in Nature and are rich with the symbolism of seasons, weather, plants, animals, earth, water, sky and fire. The principle of an all embracing, universal and omniscient Great Spirit, a connection to the Earth, diverse creation narratives and collective memories of ancient ancestors are common. Traditional worship practices are often a part of tribal gatherings with dance, rhythm, songs and trance (e.g
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Land Claims
Land claim(s) are a legal declaration of desired control over areas of property including bodies of water. The phrase is usually only used with respect to disputed or unresolved land claims
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British Columbia
British Columbia
British Columbia
(BC; French: Colombie-Britannique) is the westernmost province of Canada, located between the Pacific Ocean
Pacific Ocean
and the Rocky Mountains. With an estimated population of 4.8 million as of 2017, it is Canada's third-most populous province. The first British settlement in the area was Fort Victoria, established in 1843, which gave rise to the City of Victoria, at first the capital of the separate Colony of Vancouver
Vancouver
Island. Subsequently, on the mainland, the Colony of British Columbia (1858–1866)
Colony of British Columbia (1858–1866)
was founded by Richard Clement Moody[5] and the Royal Engineers, Columbia Detachment, in response to the Fraser Canyon
Fraser Canyon
Gold Rush
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Missing And Murdered Indigenous Women
Missing and murdered Indigenous women
Missing and murdered Indigenous women
(MMIW) is an issue affecting Indigenous people in Canada
Canada
and the United States, including the First Nations
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Idle No More
methods includeCivil disobedience Demonstrations Hunger strikes Internet activism Nonviolent resistance Picketing Transportation blocks Idle No More
Idle No More
is an ongoing protest movement, founded in December 2012 by four women: three First Nations
First Nations
women and one non-Native ally. It is a grassroots movement among the Aboriginal peoples in Canada comprising the First Nations, Métis and Inuit
Inuit
peoples and their non-Aboriginal supporters in Canada, and to a lesser extent, internationally. It has consisted of a number of political actions worldwide, inspired in part by the liquid diet hunger strike of Attawapiskat
Attawapiskat
Chief Theresa Spence[1] and further coordinated via social media
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Colony Of British Columbia
The Colony of British Columbia
British Columbia
was a crown colony in British North America from 1858 until 1866. It was founded by Richard Clement Moody, who became the first Lieutenant-Governor of British Columbia
Lieutenant-Governor of British Columbia
from 1858 to 1863. At its creation, it physically constituted approximately half the present day Canadian province of British Columbia, since it did not include the Colony of Vancouver Island, the vast and still largely uninhabited regions north of the Nass and Finlay Rivers, the regions east of the Rocky Mountains, or any of the coastal islands
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Prairie Provinces
The Canadian Prairies
Canadian Prairies
is a region in Western Canada, which may correspond to several different definitions, natural or political. The region comprises the Canadian portion of the Great Plains, and notably, the Prairie
Prairie
provinces or simply the Prairies comprise the provinces of Alberta, Saskatchewan, and Manitoba, as they are partially covered by prairie (grasslands), mostly in the southern regions of each province. In a more restricted sense, the term may also refer only to the areas of those provinces covered by prairie; their portions of the physiographic region known as the Interior Plains
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Vancouver Island
Vancouver
Vancouver
Island is in the northeastern Pacific Ocean, just off the coast of Canada. It is part of the Canadian province of British Columbia. The island is 460 kilometres (290 mi) in length, 100 kilometres (62 mi) in width at its widest point,[5] and 32,134 km2 (12,407 sq mi) in area
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McKenna-McBride Commission
The Royal Commission on Indian Affairs for the Province of British Columbia (commonly known as the McKenna–McBride Royal Commission) was a Royal Commission established in 1912 to resolve the "Indian reserve question" in British Columbia. In 1916, the Commission recommended the removal approximately 47,000 acres (190 km2) of land (with an assessed value between $1,347,912.72 and $1,533,704.72) from 54 reserves, and the addition of about 87,000 acres (350 km2) of land (with an assessed value of only $444,838.80). So while the area of the added reserve lands was nearly double that of that withdrawn, the value of the land added was only about one-third the value of the land taken away.[1][2] On July 19, 1924 an amended McKenna McBride Commission was adopted and applied as the B.C. Indian Lands Settlement Act
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Canadian Indian Residential School System
In Canada, the Indian residential school system[nb 1] was a network of boarding schools for Indigenous peoples.[nb 2] The network was funded by the Canadian government's Department of Indian Affairs and administered by Christian churches. The school system was created for the purpose of removing children from the influence of their own culture and assimilating them into the dominant Canadian culture. Over the course of the system's more than hundred-year existence, about 30%, or roughly 150,000, of Indigenous children were placed in residential schools nationally.[3][4]:2–3 At least 6,000 of these students are estimated to have died while residents.[5][6] The system had its origins in laws enacted before Confederation, but was primarily active from the passage of the Indian Act in 1876. An amendment to the Indian Act in 1884 made attendance at day schools, industrial schools, or residential schools compulsory for First Nations children
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