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Brioche
Brioche
Brioche
(/ˈbriːoʊʃ, -ɒʃ/; French: [bʁi.ɔʃ]) is a pastry of French origin that is similar to a highly enriched bread, and whose high egg and butter content (400 grams for each kilogram of flour) give it a rich and tender crumb. Chef Joel Robuchon
Joel Robuchon
describes it as "light and slightly puffy, more or less fine, according to the proportion of butter and eggs."[1] It has a dark, golden, and flaky crust, frequently accentuated by an egg wash applied after proofing. Brioche
Brioche
is considered a Viennoiserie, in that it is made in the same basic way as bread, but has the richer aspect of a pastry because of the extra addition of eggs, butter, liquid (milk, water, cream, and, sometimes, brandy) and occasionally a bit of sugar
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Bread
Bread
Bread
is a staple food prepared from a dough of flour and water, usually by baking. Throughout recorded history it has been popular around the world and is one of the oldest artificial foods, having been of importance since the dawn of agriculture. Proportions of types of flour and other ingredients vary widely, as do modes of preparation. As a result, types, shapes, sizes, and textures of breads differ around the world. Bread
Bread
may be leavened by processes such as reliance on naturally occurring sourdough microbes, chemicals, industrially produced yeast, or high-pressure aeration. Some bread is cooked before it can leaven, including for traditional or religious reasons. Non-cereal ingredients such as fruits, nuts and fats may be included
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Louis XVI Of France
Louis XVI (French pronunciation: ​[lwi sɛːz]; 23 August 1754 – 21 January 1793), born Louis-Auguste, was the last King of France before the fall of the monarchy during the French Revolution. He was referred to as Citizen Louis Capet during the final weeks of his life. In 1765, at the death of his father, Louis, son and heir apparent of Louis XV, Louis-Auguste became the new Dauphin of France. Upon his grandfather's death on 10 May 1774, he assumed the title "King of France
France
and Navarre", which he used until 4 September 1791, when he received the title of "King of the French" until the monarchy was abolished on 21 September 1792. Louis XVI was guillotined on 21 January 1793. The first part of his reign was marked by attempts to reform France
France
in accordance with Enlightenment ideas. These included efforts to abolish serfdom, remove the taille, and increase tolerance toward non-Catholics
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Cervelat
Cervelat, also cervelas, servelat or zervelat, is a sausage produced in Switzerland, France
France
(especially Alsace
Alsace
and Lyon) and parts of Germany. The recipe and preparation of the sausage vary regionally. The sausages are called cervelas in the French-speaking part of Switzerland, Cervelat
Cervelat
in the German-speaking part, and servelat in the Italian-speaking part. The terms ultimately derive from cerebrum, the Latin word for brain, which was used in early recipes.[1][2] The term "Cervelat" is the oldest of the three
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Epiphany (Christian)
Epiphany may refer to:Contents1 Religion 2 Computing 3 Arts and entertainment3.1 Fine art 3.2 Literature 3.3 Film and television 3.4 Music3.4.1 Classical music 3.4.2 Albums 3.4.3 Songs4 People 5 Other uses 6 See alsoReligion[edit] Epiphany (holiday), a Christian holiday celebrating the revelation of God the Son as a human being in Jesus Christ Season of Epiphany
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Cotgrave
Cotgrave
Cotgrave
is a town and civil parish in the borough of Rushcliffe
Rushcliffe
in Nottinghamshire, England, about 5 miles (8 km) south-east of the centre of Nottingham. The village sits at the edge of the South Nottinghamshire
Nottinghamshire
Wolds about 131 feet (40 metres) above sea level. Cotgrave's 2001 population of 7,373 people fell to 7,203 at the 2011 Census, even when Owthorpe
Owthorpe
was included.[1]Contents1 Position 2 History2.1 Memorials 2.2 Notable people3 Cotgrave
Cotgrave
Colliery 4 Amenities 5 Community 6 Country park 7 References 8 External linksPosition[edit]All Saints' from the eastWith an ancient heart that has largely escaped development, Cotgrave still has a village atmosphere despite its population
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Jean-Jacques Rousseau
Jean-Jacques Rousseau
Jean-Jacques Rousseau
(/ruːˈsoʊ/;[1] French: [ʒɑ̃ʒak ʁuso]; 28 June 1712 – 2 July 1778) was a Genevan philosopher, writer, and composer of the 18th century, mainly active in France. His political philosophy influenced the Enlightenment across Europe, as well as aspects of the French Revolution
French Revolution
and the overall development of modern political and educational thought. Rousseau's novel Emile, or On Education
Education
is a treatise on the education of the whole person for citizenship
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Confessions (Jean-Jacques Rousseau)
The Confessions is an autobiographical book by Jean-Jacques Rousseau. In modern times, it is often published with the title The Confessions of Jean-Jacques Rousseau
Jean-Jacques Rousseau
in order to distinguish it from Saint Augustine's Confessions. Covering the first fifty-three years of Rousseau's life, up to 1765, it was completed in 1769, but not published until 1782, four years after Rousseau's death, even though Rousseau did read excerpts of his manuscript publicly at various salons and other meeting places.Contents1 Background, contents 2 Debate over Truthfulness of the Confessions 3 See also 4 Notes 5 Bibliography 6 Further reading 7 External linksBackground, contents[edit] The Confessions was two distinct works, each part consisting of six books
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Princess
Princess
Princess
is a regal rank and the feminine equivalent of prince (from Latin
Latin
princeps, meaning principal citizen). Most often, the term has been used for the consort of a prince or for the daughters of a king or sovereign prince.Contents1 Princess
Princess
as a substantive title 2 Princess
Princess
as a courtesy title2.1 Descendants of monarchs 2.2 Wives of princes3 See also 4 References Princess
Princess
as a substantive title Some princesses are reigning monarchs of principalities
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Metz
1 French Land Register data, which excludes lakes, ponds, glaciers > 1 km2 (0.386 sq mi or 247 acres) and river estuaries. 2 Population without double counting: residents of multiple communes (e.g., students and military personnel) only counted once.Part of the series onLorraineFlag of Lorraine
Lorraine
since the 13th centuryHistory
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Chocolate Chip
Chocolate
Chocolate
chips are small chunks of sweetened chocolate, used as an ingredient in a number of desserts (notably chocolate chip cookies and muffins), in trail mix and less commonly in some breakfast foods such as pancakes. They are often manufactured as "teardrop"-shaped volumes with flat circular bases; another variety of chocolate chips have the shape of rectangular or square blocks
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Dauphiné
The Dauphiné (/ˌdoʊfiːˈneɪ/ or /ˈdoʊfɪneɪ/; French pronunciation: [do.fi.ne]) or Dauphiné Viennois, formerly Dauphiny in English, is a former province in southeastern France, whose area roughly corresponded to that of the present departments of Isère, Drôme, and Hautes-Alpes. The Dauphiné was originally the County of Albon. In the 12th century, the local ruler Count Guigues IV of Albon (c.1095–1142) bore a dolphin on his coat of arms and was nicknamed "le Dauphin" (French for dolphin). His descendants changed their title from Count of Albon to Dauphin of Viennois. The state took the name of Dauphiné. It became a state of the Holy Roman Empire in the 11th century. The Dauphiné is best known for its transfer from the last non-royal Dauphin (who had great debts and no direct heir) to the King of France in 1349
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Saint-Genix-sur-Guiers
1 French Land Register data, which excludes lakes, ponds, glaciers > 1 km2 (0.386 sq mi or 247 acres) and river estuaries. 2 Population without double counting: residents of multiple communes (e.g., students and military personnel) only counted once. Saint-Genix-sur-Guiers
Saint-Genix-sur-Guiers
is a commune in the Savoie
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Alsace
Alsace
Alsace
(/ælˈsæs, -ˈseɪs, ˈælsæs, -seɪs/,[3] French: [alzas] ( listen); Alsatian: ’s Elsass [ˈɛlsɑs]; German: Elsass[4] [ˈɛlzas] ( listen); Latin: Alsatia) is a cultural and historical region in eastern France
France
now located in the administrative region of Grand Est
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Custard
Custard
Custard
is a variety of culinary preparations based on a cooked mixture of milk or cream and egg yolk. Depending on how much egg or thickener is used, custard may vary in consistency from a thin pouring sauce (crème anglaise) to a thick pastry cream (French: crème pâtissière) used to fill éclairs. Most common custards are used as desserts or dessert sauces and typically include sugar and vanilla. Sometimes flour and corn starch is added as in pastry cream or crème pâtissière. Custard
Custard
is usually cooked in a double boiler (bain-marie), or heated very gently in a saucepan on a stove, though custard can also be steamed, baked in the oven with or without a water bath, or even cooked in a pressure cooker. Custard
Custard
preparation is a delicate operation, because a temperature increase of 3–6 °C (5–10 °F) leads to overcooking and curdling
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Kouglof
A Gugelhupf
Gugelhupf
(also Kugelhupf, Guglhupf, Gugelhopf, and, in France, kouglof, kougelhof, or kougelhopf) is a yeast based cake (often with raisins), traditionally baked in a distinctive circular Bundt mold. It is popular in a wide region of Central Europe, including southern Germany, Austria, Switzerland, Croatia, Slovakia, Czech Republic, Poland
Poland
and Alsace.[1] In late Medieval Austria, a Gugelhupf
Gugelhupf
was served at major community events such as weddings, and was decorated with flowers, leaves, candles, and seasonal fruits
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