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Brighton Beach
Brighton
Brighton
Beach is an oceanside neighborhood in the southern portion of the New York City
New York City
borough of Brooklyn, along the Coney Island peninsula. According to the 2010 United States
United States
Census report, the Brighton
Brighton
Beach and Coney Island
Coney Island
area, combined, had more than 110,000 residents
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Atlantic Ocean
The Atlantic Ocean
Ocean
is the second largest of the world's oceans with a total area of about 106,460,000 square kilometers (41,100,000 square miles).[2][3] It covers approximately 20 percent of the Earth's surface and about 29 percent of its water surface area. It separates the "Old World" from the "New World". The Atlantic Ocean
Ocean
occupies an elongated, S-shaped basin extending longitudinally between Eurasia
Eurasia
and Africa to the east, and the Americas to the west. As one component of the interconnected global ocean, it is connected in the north to the Arctic
Arctic
Ocean, to the Pacific Ocean
Ocean
in the southwest, the Indian Ocean
Ocean
in the southeast, and the Southern Ocean
Southern Ocean
in the south (other definitions describe the Atlantic as extending southward to Antarctica)
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American Handball
American handball
American handball
is a sport in which players use their hands to hit a small rubber ball against a wall such that their opponent cannot do the same without it touching the ground twice. The three versions are four-wall, three-wall and one-wall. Each version can be played either by two players (singles), three players (cutthroat) or four players (doubles).Contents1 History1.1 American 1.2 National Championships 1.3 Influence on racquetball and wall paddleball2 Court 3 Play3.1 Service 3.2 Return4 Variants4.1 Three-wall 4.2 One-wall5 Equipment5.1 Small ball versus big ball6 Terms and techniques 7 Variations 8 Notable players 9 See also 10 ReferencesHistory[edit]One-wall handball court with two games in progressGames in which a ball is hit or thrown have been referenced as far back as Homer
Homer
and ancient Egypt
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Thoroughbred
The Thoroughbred
Thoroughbred
is a horse breed best known for its use in horse racing. Although the word thoroughbred is sometimes used to refer to any breed of purebred horse, it technically refers only to the Thoroughbred
Thoroughbred
breed. Thoroughbreds are considered "hot-blooded" horses that are known for their agility, speed, and spirit. The Thoroughbred
Thoroughbred
as it is known today was developed in 17th and 18th-century England, when native mares were crossbred with imported Oriental stallions of Arabian, Barb, and Turkoman breeding. All modern Thoroughbreds can trace their pedigrees to three stallions originally imported into England in the 17th century and 18th century and to a larger number of foundation mares of mostly English breeding
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Henry C. Murphy
Henry Cruse Murphy (July 5, 1810 – December 1, 1882) was an American lawyer, politician and historian. During his political career, he served as Mayor of Brooklyn, a member of the United States
United States
House of Representatives, U.S
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Horse Racing
Horse
Horse
racing is an equestrian performance sport, typically involving two or more horses ridden by jockeys or driven over a set distance for competition. It is one of the most ancient of all sports and its basic premise – to identify which of two or more horses is the fastest over a set course or distance – has remained unchanged since the earliest times.[1] Horse
Horse
races vary widely in format. Often, countries have developed their own particular horse racing traditions
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Brooklyn Daily Eagle
The Brooklyn
Brooklyn
Eagle, originally The Brooklyn
Brooklyn
Eagle, and Kings County Democrat,[1] was a daily newspaper published in the city and later borough of Brooklyn, in New York City, for 114 years from 1841 to 1955. At one point, it was the afternoon paper with the largest daily circulation in the United States. Walt Whitman, the 19th-century poet, was its editor for two years. Other notable editors of the Eagle included Thomas Kinsella, St. Clair McKelway, Cleveland Rogers, Frank D. Schroth, and Charles Montgomery Skinner. The paper, added "Daily" to its name as The Brooklyn
Brooklyn
Daily Eagle and Kings County Democrat on June 1, 1846.[2][3][4] The banner name was shortened on May 14, 1849 to The Brooklyn
Brooklyn
Daily Eagle, but the lower masthead retained the political name [5][6] until June 8
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Neptune (mythology)
Neptune (Latin: Neptūnus [nɛpˈtuːnʊs]) was the god of freshwater and the sea[1] in Roman religion
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Locomotive
A locomotive or engine is a rail transport vehicle that provides the motive power for a train. If a locomotive is capable of carrying a payload, it is usually rather referred to as multiple units, motor coaches, railcars or power cars; the use of these self-propelled vehicles is increasingly common for passenger trains, but rare for freight (see CargoSprinter). Traditionally, locomotives pulled trains from the front
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Belt Parkway
The Belt System is a series of connected limited-access highways that form a belt-like circle around the New York City boroughs of Brooklyn and Queens. The system comprises four officially separate parkways; however, three of the four are signed as the Belt Parkway. The three parkways that make up the signed Belt Parkway—the Shore Parkway, the Southern Parkway
Parkway
(not to be confused with the Southern State Parkway), and the Laurelton Parkway—are a combined 25.29 miles (40.70 km) in length
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Anton Seidl
Anton Seidl
Anton Seidl
(7 May 1850 – 28 March 1898) was a famous Hungarian Wagner conductor, best known for his association with the Metropolitan Opera in New York City
New York City
and the New York Philharmonic.Contents1 Biography 2 Notes 3 References 4 Further reading 5 External linksBiography[edit] He was born in Pest, Austria-Hungary, where he began the study of music at a very early age. When only seven years old, he could pick out at the piano melodies which he had heard in the theatre. At 15, he became a student of harmony and counterpoint under Nicolitsch. He attended the normal school at Pest for three years, the gymnasium for eight years
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Metropolitan Opera
Coordinates: 40°46′22″N 73°59′3″W / 40.77278°N 73.98417°W / 40.77278; -73.98417 Metropolitan Opera
Metropolitan Opera
House at Lincoln Center for the Performing Arts, home of the Metropolitan OperaA full house at the old Metropolitan Opera
Metropolitan Opera
House, seen from the rear of the stage, at a concert by pianist Josef Hofmann, November 28, 1937Auditorium of the Metropolitan Opera
Metropolitan Opera
House at Lincoln Center for the Performing ArtsThe gold curtain, a gift of the Metropolitan Opera
Metropolitan Opera
Club, in the auditoriumThe Metropolitan Opera
Metropolitan Opera
is an opera company based in New York City, resident at the Metropolitan Opera
Metropolitan Opera
House at the Lincoln Center for the Performing Arts
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Richard Wagner
Wilhelm Richard Wagner
Richard Wagner
(/ˈvɑːɡnər/; German: [ˈʁiçaʁt ˈvaːɡnɐ] ( listen); 22 May 1813 – 13 February 1883) was a German composer, theatre director, polemicist, and conductor who is chiefly known for his operas (or, as some of his later works were later known, "music dramas"). Unlike most opera composers, Wagner wrote both the libretto and the music for each of his stage works. Initially establishing his reputation as a composer of works in the romantic vein of Carl Maria von Weber
Carl Maria von Weber
and Giacomo Meyerbeer, Wagner revolutionised opera through his concept of the Gesamtkunstwerk
Gesamtkunstwerk
("total work of art"), by which he sought to synthesise the poetic, visual, musical and dramatic arts, with music subsidiary to drama. He described this vision in a series of essays published between 1849 and 1852
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Peninsula
A peninsula (Latin: paeninsula from paene "almost” and insula "island") is a piece of land surrounded by water on the majority of its border, while being connected to a mainland from which it extends. Examples are the Upper and Lower peninsulas of the U.S. state of Michigan, the Scandinavian Peninsula
Scandinavian Peninsula
and the Malay peninsula.[1][2][3][4] The surrounding water is usually understood to be continuous, though not necessarily named as a single body of water. Peninsulas are not always named as such; one can also be a headland, cape, island promontory, bill, point, or spit.[5] A point is generally considered a tapering piece of land projecting into a body of water that is less prominent than a cape.[6] A river which courses through a very tight meander is also sometimes said to form a "peninsula" within the (almost closed) loop of water
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John Philip Sousa
John Philip Sousa
John Philip Sousa
(/ˈsuːsə/;[a] November 6, 1854 – March 6, 1932) was an American composer and conductor of the late Romantic era, known primarily for American military and patriotic marches. Because of his mastery of march composition, he is known as "The March King", or the "American March King" due to his British counterpart, Kenneth J. Alford also being known by the former nickname. Among his best-known marches are "The Stars and Stripes Forever" (National March of the United States of America), "Semper Fidelis" (Official March of the United States Marine Corps), "The Liberty Bell" (used as the theme for Monty Python's Flying Circus), "The Thunderer" and "The Washington Post". Sousa began his career playing violin and studying music theory and composition under John Esputa and George Felix Benkert. His father enlisted him in the United States Marine Band
United States Marine Band
as an apprentice in 1868
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Area Code 917
Area code 917 is an area code for all five boroughs of New York City (The Bronx, Brooklyn, Manhattan, Queens, and Staten Island). It was the first cellular/pager/voicemail area code for the city and is an overlay to Manhattan's 212/646/332 and the other four boroughs' 718/347/929. Occasionally, 917 is also assigned to landlines, most commonly in Manhattan, in large part because of the particularly severe shortage of numbers there.[citation needed] Introduced on February 4, 1992,[1] area code 917 is the first overlay area code in the North American Numbering Plan. When it was established, all cellphones in New York City
New York City
were switched to 917, freeing up telephone numbers for additional landlines.[2] Shortly after its implementation, the Federal Communications Commission announced that any new area codes going forth must not be service-specific, but did grandfather 917 from that rule
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