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Brian Redhead
Brian Leonard Redhead (28 December 1929 – 23 January 1994) was a British author, journalist and broadcaster. He was a co-presenter of the Today programme
Today programme
on BBC Radio 4
BBC Radio 4
from 1975 until 1993, shortly before his death. He was a great lover and promoter of the city of Manchester
Manchester
and the North West in general, where he lived for most of his career.Contents1 Biography 2 Death 3 Books by Brian Redhead 4 References 5 External linksBiography[edit] Redhead was born in Newcastle upon Tyne. He was the only child of Ernest Leonard Redhead, a silk screen printer and advertising agent, and his wife, Janet Crossley (née Fairley).[1] He was educated at the Royal Grammar School in Newcastle. After national service, he read history at Downing College, Cambridge. His career in journalism started in 1954 as a journalist for the Manchester
Manchester
Guardian newspaper
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International Standard Name Identifier
The International Standard Name Identifier (ISNI) is an identifier for uniquely identifying the public identities of contributors to media content such as books, television programmes, and newspaper articles. Such an identifier consists of 16 digits. It can optionally be displayed as divided into four blocks. It was developed under the auspices of the International Organization for Standardization (ISO) as Draft International Standard 27729; the valid standard was published on 15 March 2012
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Wets
During the 1980s, members of the Conservative Party in Britain who opposed some of the more hard-line policies of Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher were often referred to by their opponents as "wets". Thatcher coined the usage in 1979–80, with the meaning of feeble, lacking hardness, or willing to compromise with the unions.[1] The label was especially applied to senior members of her government who were nevertheless outside Thatcher's inner circle and who expressed opposition to her strict monetarist policies designed to tackle inflation and her cuts to public spending.[2] Hugo Young identifies the most important "inner" wets as Jim Prior, Peter Walker, and Sir Ian Gilmour, as well as Lord Carrington
Lord Carrington
and Norman St John-Stevas. The "outer" wets were more fragmented and less visible
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Monetarism
Monetarism
Monetarism
is a school of thought in monetary economics that emphasizes the role of governments in controlling the amount of money in circulation. Monetarist theory asserts that variations in the money supply have major influences on national output in the short run and on price levels over longer periods. Monetarists assert that the objectives of monetary policy are best met by targeting the growth rate of the money supply rather than by engaging in discretionary monetary policy.[1] Monetarism
Monetarism
today is mainly associated with the work of Milton Friedman, who was among the generation of economists to accept Keynesian economics
Keynesian economics
and then criticise Keynes's theory of fighting economic downturns using fiscal policy (government spending)
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President Of The Board Of Trade
The president is a common title for the head of state in most republics. In politics, president is a title given to leaders of republican states. The functions exercised by a president vary according to the form of government. In parliamentary and semi-presidential republics, they are limited to those of the head of state, and are thus largely ceremonial. In presidential republics, the role of the president is more prominent, encompassing also (in most cases) the functions of the head of government
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Peter Lilley
Peter Bruce Lilley (born 23 August 1943) is a British Conservative Party politician who was a Member of Parliament (MP) from 1983 to 2017 representing the constituency of Hitchin and Harpenden from 1997 and, prior to boundary changes, St Albans
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Newcastle Upon Tyne
Newcastle upon Tyne
Newcastle upon Tyne
(RP: /ˌnjuːkɑːsəl əpɒn ˈtaɪn/ ( listen);[4] locally: /njuːˌkæsəl əpən ˈtaɪn/ ( listen)),[4] commonly known as Newcastle, is a city in Tyne and Wear, North East England, 103 miles (166 km) south of Edinburgh
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Northern England
Northern England, also known simply as the North, is the northern part of England, considered as a single cultural area. It extends from the Scottish border in the north to near the River Trent
River Trent
in the south, although precise definitions of its southern extent vary. Northern England
England
approximately comprises three statistical regions: the North East, North West and Yorkshire
Yorkshire
and the Humber. These have a combined population of around 14.9 million as of the 2011 Census and an area of 37,331 km2 (14,414 sq mi)
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Southern England
Southern England, or the South of England, also known as the South, refers roughly to the southern counties of England. The extent of this area can take a number of different interpretations depending on the context, including geographical, cultural, political and economic. Geographically, the extent of the south of England
England
may vary from the southern quarter (below the M4/Northern M25), via one-third of the country (excluding central England), to the southern half, bordering northern England. The South is often considered a principal cultural area of England, along with the Midlands and Northern England
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Nicholas Winterton
Sir Nicholas Raymond Winterton (born 31 March 1938) is a retired British Conservative Party politician. He was the Member of Parliament (MP) for Macclesfield from 1971 until he retired from the House of Commons at the 2010 general election. His wife, Ann Winterton, also served as a Member of Parliament, representing the neighbouring Congleton constituency from 1983 to 2010.Contents1 Early life 2 Member of Parliament 3 Controversies 4 Affiliations 5 Personal life 6 References 7 External linksEarly life[edit] Winterton was born in Rugeley, Staffordshire and was educated at Bilton Grange, a prep school in Rugby, then Rugby School. He undertook his National Service from 1957–59 and was commissioned into the 14th/20th King's Hussars serving in Germany before leaving to work as a trainee sales executive with Shell-Mex and BP. In 1960, he became a Sales and General Manager of a construction machinery company, a job he retained until he was elected to Parliament
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Chancellor Of The Exchequer
The Chancellor and Under-Treasurer of Her Majesty's Exchequer, commonly known as the Chancellor of the Exchequer,[1] or simply the Chancellor,[2] is a senior official within the Government of the United Kingdom and head of Her Majesty's Treasury. The office is a British Cabinet-level position. The chancellor is responsible for all economic and financial matters, equivalent to the role of finance minister in other nations. The position is considered one of the four Great Offices of State, and in recent times has come to be the most powerful office in British politics after the Prime Minister. The Chancellor of the Exchequer
Exchequer
is now always Second Lord of the Treasury as one of the Lords Commissioners
Lords Commissioners
for executing the office of Lord High Treasurer
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Church Of England
The Church of England
England
(C of E) is the state church of England.[3][4][5] The Archbishop of Canterbury
Archbishop of Canterbury
(currently Justin Welby) is the most senior cleric, although the monarch is the supreme governor. The Church of England
England
is also the mother church of the international Anglican
Anglican
Communion
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Ordination
Ordination
Ordination
is the process by which individuals are consecrated, that is, set apart as clergy to perform various religious rites and ceremonies. The process and ceremonies of ordination vary by religion and denomination. One who is in preparation for, or who is undergoing the process of ordination is sometimes called an ordinand
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Hospice
Hospice
Hospice
care is a type of care and philosophy of care that focuses on the palliation of a chronically ill, terminally ill or seriously ill patient's pain and symptoms, and attending to their emotional and spiritual needs. In Western society, the concept of hospice has been evolving in Europe since the 11th century. Then, and for centuries thereafter in Roman Catholic tradition, hospices were places of hospitality for the sick, wounded, or dying, as well as those for travelers and pilgrims
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University Of Manchester
Blue, gold, purple                                                              Affiliations Universities Research Association Sutton 30 Russell Group EUA N8 Group NWUA ACUWebsite manchester.ac.ukThe University of Manchester
Manchester
is a public research university in Manchester, England, formed in 2004 by the merger of the University of Manchester
Manchester
Institute of Science and Technology and the Victoria University of Manchester.[6][7] The University of Manchester
Manchester
is a red brick university, a product of the civic university movement of the late-19th century. The main campus is south of Manchester
Manchester
city centre on Oxford Road
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First Gulf War
Coalition victoryIraqi forces expelled from Kuwait Kuwaiti monarchy restored Destruction of Iraqi and Kuwaiti infrastructure Failed Shia/Kurdish uprisings against the Iraqi government Saddam Hussein
Saddam Hussein
regime of the Iraqi Baathist government retains power in Iraq UN sanctions against Iraq United Nations Security Council Resolution 687
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