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Brian Redhead
BRIAN LEONARD REDHEAD (28 December 1929 – 23 January 1994) was a British author, journalist and broadcaster. He was a co-presenter of the Today programme on BBC Radio 4
BBC Radio 4
from 1975 until 1993, shortly before his death. He was a great lover and promoter of the city of Manchester
Manchester
and the North West in general, where he lived for most of his career. CONTENTS * 1 Biography * 2 Death * 3 Books by Brian Redhead * 4 References * 5 External links BIOGRAPHYRedhead was born in Newcastle upon Tyne
Newcastle upon Tyne
, . He was the only child of Ernest Leonard Redhead, a silk screen printer and advertising agent, and his wife, Janet Crossley (née Fairley). He was educated at the Royal Grammar School in Newcastle. After national service , he read history at Downing College , Cambridge
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Penguin Books
Peter Field, CEO Madeline McIntosh, President USA PUBLICATION TYPES Books IMPRINTS Penguin Classics , Viking Press OWNER(S) Bertelsmann , Pearson PLC OFFICIAL WEBSITE www.penguin.com Penguin Crime (details ) PENGUIN BOOKS is a British publishing house . It was founded in 1935 by Sir Allen Lane , his brothers Richard and John , as a line of the publishers The Bodley Head , only becoming a separate company the following year . Penguin revolutionised publishing in the 1930s through its inexpensive paperbacks , sold through Woolworths and other high street stores for sixpence , bringing high-quality paperback fiction and non-fiction to the mass market. Penguin's success demonstrated that large audiences existed for serious books. Penguin also had a significant impact on public debate in Britain, through its books on British culture , politics, the arts, and science
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Northern England
NORTHERN ENGLAND or the NORTH OF ENGLAND, also known as the NORTH COUNTRY or simply THE NORTH, is the northern part of England , considered as a single cultural area . It extends from the Scottish border in the north to near the River Trent in the south, although precise definitions of its southern extent vary. Northern England approximately comprises three statistical regions : the North East , North West and Yorkshire and the Humber . These have a combined population of around 14.9 million as of the 2011 Census and an area of 37,331 km2 (14,414 sq mi). Northern England contains much of England\'s national parkland but also has large areas of urbanisation, including the conurbations of Greater Manchester , Merseyside , Teesside , Tyneside , Wearside , South and West Yorkshire
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Southern England
SOUTHERN ENGLAND, or the SOUTH OF ENGLAND, also known as THE SOUTH, refers roughly to the southern counties of England
England
. The extent of this area can take a number of different interpretations depending on the context, including geographical, cultural, political and economic. Geographically, the extent of the south of England
England
may vary from the southern one-third of the country (excluding central England), to the southern half, bordering northern England
England
. The South is often considered a principal cultural area of England, along with the Midlands and Northern England
England
. Many consider the area to have a distinct identity from the rest of England, however without universal agreement on what cultural, political, and economic characteristics of the South are
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Peter Lilley
PETER BRUCE LILLEY (born 23 August 1943) is a British Conservative Party politician who was a Member of Parliament (MP) from 1983 to 2017 representing the constituency of Hitchin and Harpenden from 1997 and, prior to boundary changes, represented St Albans . He was a Cabinet minister in the governments of Margaret Thatcher
Margaret Thatcher
and John Major
John Major
, serving as Trade and Industry Secretary from July 1990 to April 1992, and as Social Security Secretary from April 1992 to May 1997, when he introduced Incapacity Benefit . On 26 April 2017, he announced his retirement as an MP
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President Of The Board Of Trade
The PRESIDENT OF THE BOARD OF TRADE is head of the Board of Trade . This is a committee of the Privy Council of the United Kingdom , first established as a temporary committee of inquiry in the 17th century, that evolved gradually into a government department with a diverse range of functions. The current holder is Liam Fox who is also the Secretary of State for International Trade
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Chancellor Of The Exchequer
The CHANCELLOR AND UNDER-TREASURER OF HER MAJESTY\'S EXCHEQUER, commonly known as the CHANCELLOR OF THE EXCHEQUER, or simply the CHANCELLOR, is a senior official within the Government of the United Kingdom and head of Her Majesty\'s Treasury . The office is a British Cabinet -level position. The chancellor is responsible for all economic and financial matters, equivalent to the role of Secretary of the Treasury or Minister of Finance in other nations. The position is considered one of the four Great Offices of State , and in recent times has come to be the most powerful office in British politics after the Prime Minister . The Chancellor of the Exchequer is now always Second Lord of the Treasury as one of the Lords Commissioners for executing the office of Lord High Treasurer
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Nigel Lawson
NIGEL LAWSON, BARON LAWSON OF BLABY, PC (born 11 March 1932) is a British Conservative politician and journalist. He was a Member of Parliament representing the constituency of Blaby from 1974 to 1992, and served in the cabinet of Margaret Thatcher
Margaret Thatcher
from 1981 to 1989. Prior to entering the Cabinet, he served as the Financial Secretary to the Treasury from May 1979 until his promotion to Secretary of State for Energy . He was appointed as Chancellor of the Exchequer
Chancellor of the Exchequer
in June 1983, and served until his resignation in October 1989. In both Cabinet posts, Lawson was a key proponent of Thatcher's policies of privatisation of several key industries. Lawson oversaw the sudden deregulation of financial markets in 1986, commonly referred to as the "Big Bang ". Lawson was a backbencher from 1989 until he retired in 1992, and now sits in the House of Lords
House of Lords

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Monetarism
MONETARISM is a school of thought in monetary economics that emphasizes the role of governments in controlling the amount of money in circulation . Monetarist theory asserts that variations in the money supply have major influences on national output in the short run and on price levels over longer periods. Monetarists assert that the objectives of monetary policy are best met by targeting the growth rate of the money supply rather than by engaging in discretionary monetary policy . Monetarism
Monetarism
today is mainly associated with the work of Milton Friedman , who was among the generation of economists to accept Keynesian economics and then criticise Keynes's theory of gluts using fiscal policy (government spending)
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Wets
During the 1980s, members of the Conservative Party in Britain who opposed some of the more hard-line policies of Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher were often referred to by their opponents as "WETS". Thatcher coined the usage in 1979–80, with the meaning of feeble, lacking hardness, or willing to compromise with the unions. The label was especially applied to senior members of her government who were nevertheless outside Thatcher's inner circle and who expressed opposition to her strict monetarist policies designed to tackle inflation and her cuts to public spending. Hugo Young identifies the most important "inner" wets as Jim Prior , Peter Walker , and Sir Ian Gilmour , as well as Lord Carrington
Lord Carrington
and Norman St John-Stevas
Norman St John-Stevas
. The "outer" wets were more fragmented and less visible
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Nicholas Winterton
SIR NICHOLAS RAYMOND WINTERTON (born 31 March 1938) is a retired British Conservative Party politician. He was the Member of Parliament (MP) for Macclesfield from 1971 until he retired from the House of Commons at the 2010 general election . His wife, Ann Winterton , also served as a Member of Parliament, representing the neighbouring Congleton constituency. CONTENTS * 1 Early life * 2 Member of Parliament * 3 Controversies * 4 Affiliations * 5 Personal life * 6 References * 7 External links EARLY LIFEWinterton was born in Rugeley
Rugeley
, Staffordshire and was educated at Bilton Grange , a prep school in Rugby, then Rugby School . He undertook his National Service from 1957–59 and was commissioned into the 14th/20th King\'s Hussars serving in Germany
Germany
before leaving to work as a trainee sales executive with Shell-Mex and BP
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Vermiform Appendix
The APPENDIX (or VERMIFORM APPENDIX; also CECAL APPENDIX; VERMIX; or VERMIFORM PROCESS) is a blind-ended tube connected to the cecum , from which it develops in the embryo . The cecum is a pouchlike structure of the colon , located at the junction of the small and the large intestines . The term "vermiform " comes from Latin
Latin
and means "worm-shaped". CONTENTS* 1 Structure * 1.1 Variation * 2 Functions * 2.1 Maintaining gut flora * 2.2 Immune and lymphatic system * 2.3 Vestigiality * 3 Clinical significance * 3.1 Appendicitis
Appendicitis
* 3.2 Surgery * 4 History * 5 Additional images * 6 See also * 7 References * 8 Further reading STRUCTUREThe human appendix averages 9 cm in length but can range from 2 to 20 cm. The diameter of the appendix is usually between 7 and 8 mm. The longest appendix ever removed was 26 cm long
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Hodder & Stoughton
HODDER but in 1868 Jackson and Walford retired, and Thomas Wilberforce Stoughton joined the firm, creating HODDER & STOUGHTON. Hodder "> The 1920s brought an explosion of commercial fiction at keen prices - Hodder's "Yellow jackets" series were the precursors of the first paperbacks, and included bestsellers from John Buchan
John Buchan
, Edgar Wallace , Dornford Yates
Dornford Yates
and Sapper 's Bulldog Drummond
Bulldog Drummond
. In 1928, the company became the exclusive British hardback publisher of Leslie Charteris 's adventure novel series, The Saint , publishing all 50 UK first editions of the series until 1983. In this decade they also took over ownership of the medical journal, The Lancet
The Lancet

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International Standard Book Number
The INTERNATIONAL STANDARD BOOK NUMBER (ISBN) is a unique numeric commercial book identifier. An ISBN is assigned to each edition and variation (except reprintings) of a book. For example, an e-book , a paperback and a hardcover edition of the same book would each have a different ISBN. The ISBN is 13 digits long if assigned on or after 1 January 2007, and 10 digits long if assigned before 2007. The method of assigning an ISBN is nation-based and varies from country to country, often depending on how large the publishing industry is within a country. The initial ISBN configuration of recognition was generated in 1967 based upon the 9-digit STANDARD BOOK NUMBERING (SBN) created in 1966. The 10-digit ISBN format was developed by the International Organization for Standardization (ISO) and was published in 1970 as international standard ISO 2108 (the SBN code can be converted to a ten digit ISBN by prefixing it with a zero)
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First Gulf War
Coalition victory * Iraq
Iraq
expelled from Kuwait * Kuwaiti monarchy restored * Destruction of Iraqi and Kuwaiti infrastructure * Failed Shia/Kurdish uprisings against the Iraqi government * Iraqi Kurdistan obtains autonomy, establishment of the northern Iraq
Iraq
no fly zone by the U.S. * Saddam Hussein
Saddam Hussein
retains power * U.N
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University Of Manchester
Blue, gold, purple AFFILIATIONS Universities Research Association Russell Group EUA N8 Group NWUA ACU EASN WEBSITE manchester.ac.ukTHE UNIVERSITY