HOME TheInfoList
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff







Charing Cross

Charing Cross (/ˌærɪŋ ˈkrɒs/)[1] is a junction in London, England, where six routes meet. Clockwise from north these are: the east side of Trafalgar Square leading to St Martin's Place and then Charing Cross Road; the Strand leading to the City; Northumberland Avenue leading to the Thames; Whitehall leading to Parliament Square; The Mall leading to Admiralty Arch and Buckingham Palace; and two short roads leading to Pall Mall. A bronze equestrian statue of Charles I by French sculptor Hubert Le Sueur has stood there since 1675. The original Charing Cross was one of the medieval Eleanor crosses that stood in the heart of the hamlet of Charing, Westminster, from the 1290s until its destruction on the orders of Parliament in 1647
[...More Info...]      
[...Related Items...]



Roth, Bavaria
Roth (formerly Roth bei Nürnberg) is a town in Bavaria, Germany, the capital of the district (Landkreis) Roth. It is located about 25 km south of Nuremberg. The town was first mentioned in documents in the year 1060, but settlements at its location date back much further. During the Middle Ages the town was given the right to grant asylum within the city walls. Later this tradition attracted Huguenot refugees who had to flee France because of religious persecution. They brought with them knowledge about the making of wires and founded an industry in Roth which exists until today
[...More Info...]      
[...Related Items...]



Bronze Age

The Hittite Empire was established in Hattusa in northern Anatolia from the 18th century BC. In the 14th century BC, the Hittite Kingdom was at its height, encompassing central Anatolia, southwestern Syria as far as Ugarit, and upper Mesopotamia. After 1180 BC, amid general turmoil in the Levant conjectured to have been associated with the sudden arrival of the Sea Peoples,[9][10] the kingdom disintegrated into several independent "Neo-Hittite" city-states, some of which survived until as late as the 8th century BC. Arzawa in Western Anatolia during the second half of the second millennium BC likely extended along southern Anatolia in a bWestern Asia and the Near East were the first regions to enter the Bronze Age, which began with the rise of the Mesopotamian civilization of Sumer in the mid 4th millennium BC
[...More Info...]      
[...Related Items...]



picture info

Saxons

The Saxons (Latin: Saxones, German: Sachsen, Old English: Seaxan, Old Saxon: Sahson, Low German: Sassen, Dutch: Saksen) were a group of early Germanic[1] peoples whose name was given in the early Middle Ages to a large country (Old Saxony, Latin: Saxonia) near the North Sea coast of what is now Germany.[2] In the late Roman Empire, the name was used to refer to Germanic coastal raiders, and also as a word something like the later "Viking".[3] Their origins appear to be mainly somewhere in or near the above-mentioned German North Sea coast where they are found later, in Carolingian times. In Merovingian times, continental Saxons had also been associated with the activity and settlements on the coast of what later became Normandy. Their precise origins are uncertain, and they are sometimes described as fighting inland, coming into conflict with the Franks and Thuringians
[...More Info...]      
[...Related Items...]