HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff

picture info

Breechloader
A breech-loading gun is a firearm in which the cartridge or shell is inserted or loaded into a chamber integral to the rear portion of a barrel. Modern mass production firearms are breech-loading (though mortars are generally muzzle-loaded), except those which are intended specifically by design to be muzzle-loaders, in order to be legal for certain types of hunting. Early firearms, on the other hand, were almost entirely muzzle-loading. The main advantage of breech-loading is a reduction in reloading time – it is much quicker to load the projectile and the charge into the breech of a gun or cannon than to try to force them down a long tube, especially when the bullet fit is tight and the tube has spiral ridges from rifling
[...More...]

122 Mm M1910 Howitzer
122 mm howitzer M1910 (Russian: 122-мм гаубица обр. 1910 гг.) was a Russian Empire 121.92 mm (4.8 inch) field howitzer used throughout World War I in large numbers. Following the defeats of the Russo-Japanese War, Russia sought to modernize some of its equipment, which included the purchase of foreign designed artillery
[...More...]

picture info

Lefaucheux M1858
The Lefaucheux M1858
Lefaucheux M1858
was a French military revolver developed for the navy, chambered for the 12 mm pinfire cartridge, and based on a design by Casimir Lefaucheux
Casimir Lefaucheux
and his son, Eugene (also a gun designer). The 1854 model was the first metallic-cartridge revolver adopted by a national government; the 1858 was the first variant fielded[1] It was first issued in 1858 by the French Navy (as either the Lefaucheux de Marine mle 1858 or simply M1858), and though never issued by the French Army, it was used in limited numbers by the French Cavalry during their 1862 deployment to Mexico.[2] The 1858 was later upgraded in the late 1860s as the Lefaucheux de Marine 1870. It was accepted by the French Navy, but only 150 copies were delivered by 1872.[3] Models of the 1858 were also purchased by Spain, Sweden, Italy, Russia, and Norway. Most were produced either at the state arsenal in St
[...More...]

picture info

Battle Of Brandywine
 United States Canadian auxiliaries Great Britain Hesse-KasselCommanders and leaders George Washington Nathanael Greene John Sullivan Lord Stirling Adam Stephen Anthony Wayne Casimir Pulaski Moses Hazen Sir William Howe Charles Cornwallis Wilhelm KnyphausenStrength14,600[2] 15,500 and 47 guns[2]Casualties and lossesTotal: 1,300 300 killed 600 wounded 400 captured[3] Total: 587 93 killed 488 wounded 6 missing[3] Pennsylvania
Pennsylvania
Historical MarkerDesignated March 18, 1952[4]v t e
[...More...]

picture info

American Revolutionary War
Allied victory:Peace of Paris British recognition of American independence End of the First British Empire British retention of Canada
Canada
and GibraltarTerritorial changesGreat Britain cedes to the United States
United States
the area east of the Mississippi River
Mississippi River
and south of the Great Lakes
Great Lakes
and St
[...More...]

picture info

Brown Bess
"Brown Bess" is a nickname of uncertain origin for the British Army's muzzle-loading smoothbore Land Pattern Musket
Musket
and its derivatives. This musket was used in the era of the expansion of the British Empire and acquired symbolic importance at least as significant as its physical importance. It was in use for over a hundred years with many incremental changes in its design. These versions include the Long Land Pattern, the Short Land Pattern, the India Pattern, the New Land Pattern Musket
Musket
and the Sea Service Musket. The Long Land Pattern musket and its derivatives, all .75 caliber flintlock muskets, were the standard long guns of the British Empire's land forces from 1722 until 1838, when they were superseded by a percussion cap smoothbore musket. The British Ordnance System converted many flintlocks into the new percussion system known as the Pattern 1839 Musket
[...More...]

picture info

Musket
A musket is a muzzle-loaded, smoothbore long gun that appeared in early 16th century Europe, at first as a heavier variant of the arquebus, capable of penetrating heavy armor.[1] By the mid-16th century, this type of musket went out of use as heavy armor declined, but as the matchlock became standard, the term musket continued as the name given for any long gun with a flintlock, and then its successors, all the way through the mid 1800s.[2] This style of musket was retired in the 19th century when rifled muskets (simply called rifles in modern terminology) became common as a result of cartridged breech-loading firearms introduced by Casimir Lefaucheux
[...More...]

François Prélat
François Prélat was a French gunsmith and inventor. He is thought to have invented the first fully contained cartridge in 1808, as well as the percussion cap in 1818. In association with the Swiss
Swiss
gunsmith Jean Samuel Pauly, François Prélat invented from 1808 to 1812 the first totally contained cartridge, incorporating in one package a fulminate primer, black powder and a round bullet. A percussion pin would provoke ignition.[1] This was a marked improvement over the invention of Jean Lepage, in which the fulminate was simply poured into a pan near the breech. The new cartridge was particularly considered useful for cavalry firearms, as the motion of the horse and the difficulty of movement rendered conventional loading extremely difficult
[...More...]

Jean Samuel Pauly
Jean Samuel Pauly (1766 – c.1821), born Samuel Johannes Pauli, was a Swiss inventor and gunsmith of the early 19th century. Parish records show that he was baptised in Vechigen
Vechigen
near Bern, Switzerland
Switzerland
on 13 April 1766, the son of Johann Pauli and Veronika Christine (née Pulfer).[1][2] Career[edit] Switzerland Pauly started working as a carriage builder and mechanic in his father's workshop; he was constantly looking for technical improvements (such as a self-lubricating axle) and also to increase the comfort of passengers
[...More...]

picture info

Mercury Fulminate
Mercury(II) fulminate, or Hg(CNO)2, is a primary explosive. It is highly sensitive to friction, heat and shock and is mainly used as a trigger for other explosives in percussion caps and blasting caps. Mercury(II) cyanate, though its empirical formula is identical, has a different atomic arrangement; the cyanate and fulminate anions are isomers. First used as a priming composition in small copper caps beginning in the 1820s, mercury fulminate quickly replaced flints as a means to ignite black powder charges in muzzle-loading firearms. Later, during the late 19th century and most of the 20th century, mercury fulminate or potassium chlorate became widely used in primers for self-contained rifle and pistol ammunition. Mercury fulminate has the distinct advantage over potassium chlorate of being non-corrosive, but it is known to weaken with time, by decomposing into its constituent elements. The reduced mercury which results forms amalgams with cartridge brass, weakening it, as well
[...More...]

picture info

Casimir Lefaucheux
Casimir Lefaucheux
Casimir Lefaucheux
(26 January 1802 – 9 August 1852) was a French gunsmith. He was born in Bonnétable
Bonnétable
and died in Paris. Casimir Lefaucheux
Casimir Lefaucheux
obtained his first patent in 1827. In 1832, he completed a drop-barrel sporting gun with paper-cased cartridges.[1] Casimir Lefaucheux
Casimir Lefaucheux
is credited with the invention of one of the first efficient self-contained cartridge system in 1836, featuring a pin-fire mechanism. This followed the pioneering work of Jean Samuel Pauly in 1808-1812
[...More...]

picture info

Pinfire Cartridge
A pinfire cartridge is an obsolete type of metallic firearm cartridge in which the priming compound is ignited by striking a small pin which protrudes radially from just above the base of the cartridge. Invented by Frenchman Casimir Lefaucheux
Casimir Lefaucheux
in the 1830s[1] but not patented until 1835,[2] it was one of the earliest practical designs of a metallic cartridge. Its history is closely associated with the development of the breechloader which replaced muzzle-loading weapons.Contents1 History 2 Current status 3 See also 4 NotesHistory[edit]Detail of a Lefaucheux M1858
Lefaucheux M1858
pistol. Notice the pin protruding from the cartridge.The Swiss gun maker Samuel Joannes Pauly patented the first breechloading cartridge in 1812
[...More...]

picture info

LeMat Revolver
The LeMat
LeMat
revolver was a .42 or .36 caliber cap & ball black powder revolver invented by Jean Alexandre LeMat
LeMat
of New Orleans, which featured an unusual secondary 20 gauge smooth-bore barrel capable of firing buckshot. It saw service with the armed forces of the Confederate States
Confederate States
of America during the American Civil War
American Civil War
of 1861–65 and the Army of the Government of National Defense during the Franco-Prussian War.Contents1 History and design 2 Civil War use 3 Variants 4 Modern reproductions 5 In popular culture 6 See also 7 References 8 External linksHistory and design[edit] This unique sidearm was also known as the "Grape Shot Revolver." It was developed in New Orleans
New Orleans
in 1856 by Jean Alexander Le Mat, whose manufacturing effort was backed by P. G. T
[...More...]

Gallery Gun
A gallery gun, Flobert gun, saloon gun, or parlor gun is a type of firearm designed for indoor shooting.[1][2] These guns were first developed in 1845 when French inventor Louis Nicolas Flobert modified a percussion cap to hold a small lead bullet.Contents1 Flobert guns 2 Gallery guns 3 Parlour pistols 4 Saloon gun 5 See also 6 References 7 External linksFlobert guns[edit] In 1845, French inventor Louis Nicolas Flobert modified a percussion cap to hold a small lead bullet. Flobert modified the cap further by creating a rim at the edge so that the cap and bullet could fit in a chamber of a pistol. The round contained no powder and was designed to be a toy
[...More...]

picture info

British Army
The British Army
Army
is the principal land warfare force of the United Kingdom, a part of British Armed Forces. As of 2017, the British Army comprises just over 80,000 trained regular (full-time) personnel and just over 26,500 trained reserve (part-time) personnel.[4] Since April 2013, Ministry of Defence publications have not reported the entire strength of the Regular Reserve; instead, only Regular Reserves serving under the fixed-term reserve contracts have been counted.[5] The modern British Army
Army
traces back to 1707, with an antecedent in the English Army
Army
that was created during the Restoration in 1660
[...More...]

picture info

Rimfire Ammunition
Rimfire is a method of ignition for metallic firearm cartridges as well as the cartridges themselves. It is called rimfire because the firing pin of a gun strikes and crushes the base's rim to ignite the primer. The rim of the rimfire cartridge is essentially an extended and widened percussion cap which contains the priming compound, while the cartridge case itself contains the propellant powder and the projectile (bullet). Once the rim of the cartridge has been struck and the bullet discharged, the cartridge cannot be reloaded, because the head has been deformed by the firing pin impact. While many other different cartridge priming methods have been tried since the 19th century, only rimfire technology and centerfire technology survive today in significant use. Frenchman Louis-Nicolas Flobert invented the first rimfire metallic cartridge in 1845
[...More...]

.