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Brown Bread
Brown bread is a designation often given to breads made with significant amounts of whole grain flour, usually wheat, and sometimes dark-colored ingredients such as molasses or coffee. In Canada, the United Kingdom and South Africa it simply refers to wholemeal or whole wheat bread, except in the Maritimes and New England, where it implies bread made with molasses
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Seasoning
Seasoning is the process of adding herbs or spices to food to enhance the flavour. Seasonings include herbs and spices, which are themselves frequently referred to as "seasonings". However, Larousse Gastronomique states that "to season and to flavour are not the same thing", insisting that seasoning includes a large or small amount of salt being added to a preparation.[1] Salt may be used to draw out water, or to magnify a natural flavour of a food making it richer or more delicate, depending on the dish. This type of procedure is akin to curing. For instance, sea salt (a coarser-grained salt) is rubbed into chicken, lamb, and beef to tenderize the meat and improve flavour. Other seasonings like black pepper and basil transfer some of their flavour to the food
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Buttermilk
Buttermilk is a fermented dairy drink. Traditionally, it was the liquid left behind after churning butter out of cultured cream; however, most modern buttermilk is cultured. It is common in warm climates (including the Balkans[failed verification], India, the Middle East[failed verification] and the Southern United States) where unrefrigerated fresh milk sours quickly.[1] Buttermilk can be drunk straight, and it can also be used in cooking. In making soda bread, the acid in buttermilk reacts with the raising agent, sodium bicarbonate, to produce carbon dioxide which acts as the leavening agent
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Batter (cooking)

Batter is thin dough that can be easily poured into a pan.[1] [2] Batter is used mainly for pancakes, light cakes, and as a coating for fried foods. The word batter comes from the French word battre which means to beat,[3] as many batters require vigorous beating or whisking in their preparation.

Many batters are made by combining dry flours with liquids such as water, milk or eggs. Batters can also be made by soaking grains in water and grinding them wet
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Hansel And Gretel
"Hansel and Gretel" (/ˈhænsəl, ˈhɛn- ...ˈɡrɛtəl/; also known as Hansel and Grettel, Hansel and Grethel, or Little Brother and Little Sister; German: Hänsel und Gret(h)el [ˈhɛnzl̩ ʔʊnt ˈɡʁeːtl̩])[a] is a German fairy tale collected by the Brothers Grimm and published in 1812 in Grimm's Fairy Tales (KHM 15).[1][2] Hansel and Gretel, are a brother and sister abandoned in a forest, where they fall into the hands of a cannibalistic witch who lives in a house made of gingerbread, cake, and pastries. The witch intends to fatten the children before eventually eating them, but Gretel outwits the witch and kills her
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List Of Breads
This is a list of baked or steamed bread varieties. It does not include cakes, pastries, or fried dough foods, which are listed in separate Wikipedia articles. It also does not list foods in which bread is an ingredient which is processed further before serving. Jewish
Braided, made with wheat flour, yeast, oil/butter and eggs (optional), usually made by Jewish people for the Shabbat.
Chapati Flatbread South Asia Thin in size and made with wheat flour; usually eaten with cooked dal (lentil soup), vegetable curry, chicken and mutton curry dishes; pieces are used to wrap around and pick up each bite of the cooked dish.
Chickpea bread Leavened Albania
Turkey
Made from chickpea flour
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Grain
A grain is a small, hard, dry seed, with or without an attached hull or fruit layer, harvested for human or animal consumption.[1] A grain crop is a grain-producing plant. The two main types of commercial grain crops are cereals and legumes. After being harvested, dry grains are more durable than other staple foods, such as starchy fruits (plantains, breadfruit, etc.) and tubers (sweet potatoes, cassava, and more). This durability has made grains well suited to industrial agriculture, since they can be mechanically harvested, transported by rail or ship, stored for long periods in silos, and milled for flour or pressed for oil
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