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Boxing The Compass
The points of the compass mark the divisions on a compass, which is primarily divided into four points: north, south, east, and west. These cardinal directions are further subdivided by the addition of the four intercardinal (or ordinal) directions—northeast (NE), southeast (SE), southwest (SW), and northwest (NW)—to indicate the eight principal winds. In meteorological usage, further intermediate points between cardinal and ordinal points, such as north-northeast (NNE) are added to give the 16 points of a wind compass.[1]32-point compass roseAt the most complete division are the full thirty-two points of the mariner's compass,[2] which adds points such as north by east (NbE) between north and north-northeast, and northeast by north (NEbN) between north-northeast and northeast
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Compass Point (other)
Compass Point
Compass Point
may refer to:Cardinal direction, north, south, east or west Compass point, a direction on a traditional compass Compass Point
Compass Point
(David Allan Coe album)
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Libeccio
The libeccio (/lɪˈbɛtʃioʊ/; Italian: [liˈbettʃo]; Croatian: lebić [lěbitɕ]; Catalan: llebeig [ʎəˈβɛtʃ]; Greek: λίβας [ˈlivas]; Serbian: lebić, [lěbitɕ])[a] is the westerly or south-westerly wind which predominates in northern Corsica
Corsica
all year round; it frequently raises high seas and may give violent westerly squalls. In summer it is most persistent, but in winter it alternates with the Tramontane
Tramontane
(north-east or north)
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Catalan Language
Catalan (/ˈkætəlæn, -ən, ˌkætəˈlæn/;[4] autonym: català [kətəˈla] or [kataˈla]) is a Western Romance
Western Romance
language derived from Vulgar Latin
Vulgar Latin
and named after the medieval Principality of Catalonia, in northeastern modern Spain. It is the only official language of Andorra,[5] and a co-official language of the Spanish autonomous communities of Catalonia, the Balearic Islands
Balearic Islands
and Valencia (where the language is known as Valencian). It also has semi-official status in the Italian commune of Alghero.[6] These territories are often called Catalan Countries. Catalan evolved from Vulgar Latin
Vulgar Latin
in the Middle Ages around the eastern Pyrenees
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Greek Language
Greek (Modern Greek: ελληνικά [eliniˈka], elliniká, "Greek", ελληνική γλώσσα [eliniˈci ˈɣlosa] ( listen), ellinikí glóssa, "Greek language") is an independent branch of the Indo-European family of languages, native to Greece
Greece
and other parts of the Eastern Mediterranean
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Arabic
Arabic
Arabic
(Arabic: العَرَبِيَّة‎) al-ʻarabiyyah [ʔalʕaraˈbijːah] ( listen) or (Arabic: عَرَبِيّ‎) ʻarabī [ˈʕarabiː] ( listen) or [ʕaraˈbij]) is a Central Semitic language that first emerged in Iron Age northwestern Arabia and is now the lingua franca of the Arab world.[4] It is named after the Arabs, a term initially used to describe peoples living from Mesopotamia
Mesopotamia
in the east to the Anti- Lebanon
Lebanon
mountains in the west, in northwestern Arabia, and in the Sinai peninsula. Arabic
Arabic
is classified as a macrolanguage comprising 30 modern varieties, including its standard form (Modern Standard Arabic) [5]. The modern written language (Modern Standard Arabic) is derived from Classical Arabic
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Portolan Chart
Portolan or portulan charts are navigational maps based on compass directions and estimated distances observed by the pilots at sea. They were first made in the 13th century in Italy, and later in Spain
Spain
and Portugal, with later 15th and 16th century charts noted for their cartographic accuracy.[1] With the advent of widespread competition among seagoing nations during the Age of Discovery, Portugal
Portugal
and Spain considered such maps to be state secrets. The English and Dutch, relative newcomers, found the description of Atlantic and Indian coastlines extremely valuable for their raiding, and later trading, ships
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Bora (wind)
The bora[1][2] (Croatian: bura, Montenegrin: bura/бура, Bulgarian and Russian: бора, Greek: μπόρα, Slovene: burja, Italian, Polish and Turkish as well as Venetian: bòra) is a northern to north-eastern katabatic wind in the Adriatic
Adriatic
Sea. Similar nomenclature is used for north-eastern winds in other littoral areas of eastern Mediterranean
Mediterranean
and Black Sea
Black Sea
basins. The same root is found in the name of the Greek mythological figure of Boreas/Βορέας, the North Wind
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Tramontane
Tramontane
Tramontane
/trəˈmɒnteɪn/[a] is a classical name for a northern wind. The exact form of the name and precise direction varies from country to country. The word came to English from Italian tramontana, which developed from Latin trānsmontānus (trāns- + montānus), "beyond/across the mountains",[1] referring to the Alps
Alps
in the North of Italy
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Gregale
The Gregale
Gregale
(Catalan: Gregal, Italian: Grecale, Lombard: Grecal, Maltese: Grigal, Occitan: Gregau, Greek: Γραίγος, Graigos) is a Mediterranean
Mediterranean
wind that can occur during times when a low-pressure area moves through the area to the south of Malta
Malta
and causes a strong, cool, northeasterly wind to affect the island
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Levant (wind)
The levant (Catalan: Llevant, Italian: Levante, Croatian: Levant, Maltese: Lvant, Greek: Λεβάντες, Spanish: Levante) is an easterly wind that blows in the western Mediterranean Sea
Mediterranean Sea
and southern France, an example of mountain-gap wind. In Roussillon it is called "llevant" and in Corsica "levante". In the western Mediterranean, particularly when the wind blows through the Strait of Gibraltar, it is called the Viento de Levante or the Levanter. It is also known as the Solano. When blowing moderately or strongly, the levant causes heavy swells on the Mediterranean. Usually gentle and damp, the levant frequently brings clouds and rain. When it brings good weather, it is known as the "levant blanc".[1] The origin of the name is the same as the origin of the Levant, the region of the eastern Mediterranean: it is the Middle French word "levant", the participle of lever "to raise" — as in soleil levant "rising sun" — from the Latin levare
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Sirocco
Sirocco, scirocco, /sɪˈrɒkoʊ/, jugo or, rarely, siroc (Catalan: Xaloc, Greek: Σορόκος, Spanish: Siroco, Occitan: Siròc, Eisseròc, Croatian: Jugo, literally southerly , Libyan Arabic: Ghibli, Egypt: khamsin, Tunisia: ch'hilli) is a Mediterranean
Mediterranean
wind that comes from the Sahara
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Ostro
Ostro
Ostro
(Catalan: Migjorn, Croatian: Oštro, Greek: Όστρια, Montenegrin: Oštrijal), or Austro, is a southerly wind in the Mediterranean Sea, especially the Adriatic. Its name is Italian, derived from the Latin name Auster, which also meant a southerly wind. It is a warm and humid wind that often carries rain, but it is also sometimes identified with the Libeccio
Libeccio
and Scirocco. External links[edit]List of wind names (in German)v t eCompass directionCardinal and ordinal directionsNorth Northeast East Southeast South Southwest West NorthwestThe eight principal windsTramontane Gregale Levant Sirocco Ostro Libeccio Ponente MistralThis climatology/meteorology–related article is a stub
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Ponente
Ponente
Ponente
(Italian: [poˈnɛnte], Spanish: Poniente, Croatian: Punenat, Catalan: Ponent, Portuguese: Poente, Maltese: Punent, Greek: Πουνέντες, Serbian: Punenat) is the traditional cardinal point West, more specifically a wind that blows from the west. The name is derived from the Latin via Italian for "setting", meaning sunset, and appeared by that name in the traditional compass rose on the Mediterranean Sea
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Sicilian Language
51-AAA-re & -rf (mainland 51-AAA-rc & -rd)This article contains IPA phonetic symbols. Without proper rendering support, you may see question marks, boxes, or other symbols instead of Unicode
Unicode
characters
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Mistral (wind)
The mistral (Catalan: Mestral, Greek: Μαΐστρος, Italian: Maestrale, Croatian:Maestral) is a strong, cold, northwesterly wind that blows from southern France into the Gulf of Lion in the northern Mediterranean, with sustained winds often exceeding 66 km/h (41 mph), sometimes reaching 185 km/h (115 mph).[1] It is most common in the winter and spring, and strongest in the transition between the two seasons
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