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Bookmatching
BOOKMATCHING is the practice of matching two (or more) wood or stone surfaces, so that two adjoining surfaces mirror each other, giving the impression of an opened book. As applied to wood, bookmatching is usually done with veneer (produced in one of several ways), but can also be done with solid wood. The technique is used to beautify a variety of objects such as furniture, violins , guitars or the interior of high-luxury cars. The two adjoining surfaces are produced from the same piece of wood, so that they have (almost) exactly the same appearance, but mirrored. The final effect varies with the figure of the wood chosen and can range from extremely subtle (so that the two surfaces almost appear to be a single piece of wood), to dramatic effects with wavy grain showcased, as in high-end guitars. Bookmatching
Bookmatching
is also possible with marble or other patterned stone
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Sawdust
SAWDUST or WOOD DUST is a by-product of cutting, grinding, drilling, sanding, or otherwise pulverizing wood or any other material with a saw or other tool; it is composed of fine particles of wood. It is also the byproduct of certain animals, birds and insects which live in wood, such as the woodpecker and carpenter ant . It can present a hazard in manufacturing industries, especially in terms of its flammability. Sawdust
Sawdust
is the main component of particleboard . CONTENTS* 1 Uses * 1.1 Use in food * 2 Health and safety hazards * 2.1 Explosions and fire * 2.2 Environmental effects * 3 See also * 4 References USESA major use of sawdust is for particleboard; coarse sawdust may be used for wood pulp . Sawdust
Sawdust
has a variety of other practical uses, including serving as a mulch , as an alternative to clay cat litter , or as a fuel
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Root Carving
ROOT CARVING is a traditional Chinese art
Chinese art
form. It consists of carving and polishing tree roots into various artistic creations. CONTENTS * 1 History * 2 Features * 3 Necessities * 4 References HISTORYUsing roots to make necessities has been practiced since primitive society. Like other artistic crafts, art of roots produced from primitive labor. The earliest root carvings are “辟邪” and “角形器” showing up in the Warring States period
Warring States period
. In the Sui and Tang dynasties, root carving works not only prevailed in folk, but they were also cherished by the governing class. In the Tang dynasty, people laid emphasis on the natural forms of roots, cleverly taking advantage of the effect of corrosion and moth-eaten. In the Song and Yuan dynasties, art of root carving not only developed in the court and folk, but also appeared in grottoes and temples
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Segmented Turning
SEGMENTED TURNING is turning on a lathe where the initial workpiece is composed of multiple glued-together parts. The process involves gluing up several pieces of wood to create patterns and visual effects in turned projects. Segmented turning
Segmented turning
is also known as polychromatic turning. A ring-constructed turning In traditional wood turning, the template is a single piece of wood. The size, grain orientation and colors of the wood, will frame how it can be turned into an object like a bowl, platter, or vase. With segmented turning, the size and patterns are limited only by imagination, skill and patience. While the vast majority of segmented turnings are vessels of one sort or another, strictly speaking, any turned object comprising multiple pieces of glued wood could be classified as a segmented turning. Examples include pens, bowls, vases, salt mills, pepper mills, and rolling pins
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Shingle Weaving
A SHINGLE WEAVER (US) or SHINGLER (UK) is an employee of a wood products mill who engages in the creation of wooden roofing shingles or the closely related product known as "shakes ." In the Pacific Northwest region of the United States, historically the leading producer of this product, such shingles are generally made of Western Red Cedar , an aromatic and disease-resistant wood indigenous to the area. The use of the term "weaver" for a shingle maker related to the way in which the workers fitted the shingles together in bundles but the meaning has extended to anyone who works in a shingle mill
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Shipbuilding
SHIPBUILDING is the construction of ships and other floating vessels . It normally takes place in a specialized facility known as a shipyard . SHIPBUILDERS, also called SHIPWRIGHTS, follow a specialized occupation that traces its roots to before recorded history . Shipbuilding
Shipbuilding
and ship repairs, both commercial and military, are referred to as "naval engineering ". The construction of boats is a similar activity called boat building . The dismantling of ships is called ship breaking
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Relief Carving
RELIEF CARVING as a type of wood carving in which figures are carved in a flat panel of wood. The figures project only slightly from the background rather than standing freely. Depending on the degree of projection, reliefs may also be classified as high or medium relief. Relief
Relief
carving can be described as "carving pictures in wood". The process of relief carving involves removing wood from a flat wood panel in such a way that an object appears to rise out of the wood. Relief
Relief
carving begins with a design idea, usually put to paper in the form of a master pattern which is then transferred to the wood surface. Most relief carving is done with hand tools - chisels and gouges - which often require a mallet to drive them through the wood. As wood is removed from the panel around the objects traced onto it from the pattern, the objects themselves stand up from the background wood
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Pyrography
PYROGRAPHY or PYROGRAVURE is the art of decorating wood or other materials with burn marks resulting from the controlled application of a heated object such as a poker . It is also known as POKERWORK or WOOD BURNING. The term means "writing with fire", from the Greek pur (fire) and graphos (writing). It can be practiced using specialized modern pyrography tools, or using a metal implement heated in a fire, or even sunlight concentrated with a magnifying lens . " Pyrography
Pyrography
dates from the 17th century and reached its highest standard in the 19th century. In its crude form it is pokerwork." A large range of tones and shades can be achieved. Varying the type of tip used, the temperature, or the way the iron is applied to the material all create different effects. After the design is burned in, wooden objects are often coloured
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Log Building
LOG BUILDINGS and STRUCTURES can be categorized as historic and modern. A diverse selection of their forms and styles with examples of architectural elements is discussed in the following articles
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Marquetry
MARQUETRY (also spelled as MARQUETERIE) is the art and craft of applying pieces of veneer to a structure to form decorative patterns, designs or pictures. The technique may be applied to case furniture or even seat furniture, to decorative small objects with smooth, veneerable surfaces or to freestanding pictorial panels appreciated in their own right. Parquetry
Parquetry
is a technique very similar to marquetry that utilizes pieces of veneer in simple repeating geometric shapes to form tiled patterns such as would cover a floor (parquet), or forming basketweave or brickwork patterns, trelliswork and the like. Marquetry
Marquetry
(and parquetry too) differs from the more ancient craft of inlay , or intarsia , in which a solid body of one material is cut out to receive sections of another to form the surface pattern. The word derives from a Middle French word meaning "inlaid work"
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Millwork (building Material)
MILLWORK BUILDING MATERIALS are historically any woodmill -produced building construction interior-finish, exterior-finish, or decorative components. Stock profiled and patterned millwork building components fabricated by milling at a planing mill can usually be installed with minimal alteration. Today, millwork also encompasses items that are made using alternatives to wood, including synthetics, plastics, and wood-adhesive composites. CONTENTS * 1 Specifics * 2 Historical context * 3 Fabrication * 4 Uses * 5 Types * 6 References SPECIFICSMillwork building materials include the ready-made carpentry elements usually installed in any building. Many of the specific features of the space are created using different types of architectural millwork: doors, window casings, and cabinets to name just a few. The materials used in millwork items today are most often graded-lumber , code compliant fasteners , various glasses , and other decorative coatings and finishes
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Parquetry
PARQUET is a geometric mosaic of wood pieces used for decorative effect. The two main uses of parquetry are as wood veneer patterns on furniture and block patterns for flooring . Parquet patterns are entirely geometrical and angular—squares , triangles , lozenges . The most popular parquet flooring pattern is herringbone . (The use of curved and natural shapes constitutes marquetry rather than parquetry.) CONTENTS * 1 History * 2 Materials * 3 Cleaning * 4 Repair * 5 Domestic use * 6 Basketball courts * 7 See also * 8 Notes and references * 9 External links HISTORY Parquet Versailles The word derives from the Old French parchet (the diminutive of parc), literally meaning "a small enclosed space". Large diagonal squares known as parquet de Versailles were introduced in 1684 as parquet de menuiserie ("woodwork parquet") to replace the marble flooring that required constant washing, which tended to rot the joists beneath the floors
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Spindle Turning
SPINDLE TURNING, or turning between centers, is a woodturning method referring to a piece of wood on a wood lathe that is being turned on its center axis. Upholstered stool , with frame members made by spindle turning METHODFor spindle turning, the wood is held on the lathe either by both ends (between the headstock and tailstock) or by one end only using a lathe chuck Wood
Wood
is generally removed by running a turning tool down the slope of the wood from a larger diameter in the wood to a smaller diameter. EXAMPLES Spindle turning
Spindle turning
is the method used for items such as chair and table legs, lamps, cues, bats, pens, candlesticks etc. i.e. long and thin objects. REFERENCES * ^ Clifford, Brian. " Woodturning
Woodturning
- Grain and other factors", 1999. Accessed April 30, 2007. * ^ Raffan, Richard (1 January 1900). "A Woodturner\'s Guide to Chucks and Jaws". FineWoodworking.com
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Timber Framing
TIMBER FRAMING and "POST-AND-BEAM" CONSTRUCTION are methods of building with heavy timbers (posts and beams ) rather than dimensional lumber such as 2x4s. Traditional timber framing is the method of creating structures using heavy squared-off and carefully fitted and joined timbers with joints secured by large wooden pegs (larger versions of the mortise and tenon joints in furniture). It is commonplace in wooden buildings from the 19th century and earlier. The method comes from making things out of logs and tree trunks without modern high tech saws to cut lumber from the starting material stock. Hewing with broadaxes , adzes , and draw knives and using hand-powered braces and augers (brace and bit) and other laborious woodworking , artisans or framers could gradually assemble a building capable of bearing heavy weight without excessive use of interior space given over to vertical support posts
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