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Book Of Revelation
The Book
Book
of Revelation, often called the Revelation to John, the Apocalypse
Apocalypse
of John, The Revelation, or simply Revelation or Apocalypse (and often misquoted as Revelations), is a book of the New Testament that occupies a central place in Christian eschatology. Its title is derived from the first word of the text, written in Koine Greek: apokalypsis, meaning "unveiling" or "revelation" (before title pages and titles, books were commonly known by their first words, as is also the case of the Hebrew Five Books of Moses
Five Books of Moses
(Torah)). The Book
Book
of Revelation is the only apocalyptic document in the New Testament
New Testament
canon (although there are short apocalyptic passages in various places in the Gospels and the Epistles).[a] The author names himself in the text as "John", but his precise identity remains a point of academic debate
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Book Of Revelation (other)
Book of Revelation
Book of Revelation
is the ending book of the New Testament in the Bible. Book of Revelation
Book of Revelation
may also refer to:The
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John The Evangelist
John the Evangelist
John the Evangelist
(Greek: Εὐαγγελιστής Ἰωάννης, Coptic: ⲓⲱⲁⲛⲛⲏⲥ or ⲓⲱ̅ⲁ) is the name traditionally given to the author of the Gospel
Gospel
of John
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Third Epistle Of John
The Third Epistle
Epistle
of John, often referred to as Third John and written 3 John or III John, is the antepenultimate book of the New Testament and attributed to John the Evangelist, traditionally thought to be the author of the Gospel
Gospel
of John and the other two epistles of John. The Third Epistle
Epistle
of John is a private letter composed to a man named Gaius, recommending to him a group of Christians led by Demetrius, which had come to preach the gospel in the area where Gaius lived
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Epistle Of Jude
The Epistle
Epistle
of Jude, often shortened to Jude, is the penultimate book of the New Testament
New Testament
and is traditionally attributed to Jude, the servant of Jesus
Jesus
and the brother of James the Just.Contents1 Composition 2 Content2.1 Outline 2.2 Canonical status 2.3 Authorship 2.4 Style3 Jude and 2 Peter 4 References to other books 5 See also 6 Notes 7 External linksComposition[edit] The letter of Jude was one of the disputed books of the Canon.[1] The links between the Epistle
Epistle
and 2 Peter, its use of the Apocryphal Books, and its brevity raised concern. It is one of the shortest books in the Bible, being only 25 verses long. Content[edit] Jude urges his readers to defend the deposit of Christ's doctrine that had been closed by the time he wrote his epistle, and to remember the words of the apostles spoken somewhat before
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Apocalypse
— Events —Death Resurrection Last JudgementJewishMessianismBook of Daniel KabbalahTaoistLi HongZoroastrianFrashokereti SaoshyantInter-religiousEnd times Apocalypticism2012 phenomenonMillenarianism Last Judgment Resurrection
Resurrection
of the deadGog and Magog Messianic Agev t e Apocalypse
Apocalypse
depicted in Christian Orthodox traditional fresco scenes in Osogovo Monastery, Republic of MacedoniaSt. John at Patmos: the receiving of an apocalyptic visionAn apocalypse (Ancient Greek: ἀποκάλυψις apokálypsis, from ἀπό and καλύπτω, literally meaning "an uncovering"[1]) is a disclosure of knowledge or revelation
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New Testament Manuscript
Outline of Bible-related topics   Bible
Bible
book    Bible
Bible
portalv t eA biblical manuscript is any handwritten copy of a portion of the text of the Bible. The word Bible
Bible
comes from the Greek biblia (books); manuscript comes from Latin
Latin
manu (hand) and scriptum (written). Biblical manuscripts vary in size from tiny scrolls containing individual verses of the Jewish scriptures (see Tefillin) to huge polyglot codices (multi-lingual books) containing both the Hebrew Bible
Bible
(Tanakh) and the New Testament, as well as extracanonical works. The study of biblical manuscripts is important because handwritten copies of books can contain errors
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Johannine Literature
Johannine literature
Johannine literature
refers to the collection of New Testament
New Testament
works that are traditionally attributed to John the Apostle
John the Apostle
or to Johannine Christian community.[1] Johannine literature
Johannine literature
is traditionally considered to include the following works:[2]The Gospel of John The Johannine epistlesThe First Epistle of John The Second Epistle of John The Third Epistle of JohnThe Book of RevelationOf these five books, the only one that explicitly identifies its author as a "John" is Revelation
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Johannine Epistles
The Johannine epistles, the Epistles of John, or the Letters of John are three of the catholic epistles of the New Testament, thought to have been written AD 85–100.[1] Most scholars agree that all three letters are written by the same author, although there is debate on who that author is.[2][3][4]Contents1 First 2 Second 3 Third 4 ReferencesFirst[edit] Main article: First Epistle
Epistle
of John This epistle unlike the other two is written more as a sermon, one to help strengthen people's faith
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Events Of Revelation
The events of Revelation are the events that occur in the Book of Revelation of the New Testament.[1] An outline follows below, by chapter, in linear format.Contents1 Outline of Revelation1.1 Chapter 1 1.2 Chapter 2 1.3 Chapter 3 1.4 Chapter 4 1.5 Chapter 5 1.6 Chapter 6 1.7 Chapter 7 1.8 Chapter 8 1.9 Chapter 9 1.10 Chapter 10 1.11 Chapter 11 1.12 Chapter 121.12.1 War in heaven 1.12.2 The Woman1.13 Chapter 13 1.14 Chapter 14 1.15 Chapter 15 1.16 Chapter 16 1.17 Chapter 17 1.18 Chapter 18 1.19 Chapter 19 1.20 Chapter 20 1.21 Chapter 21 1.22 Chapter 222 References 3 External linksOutline of Revelation[edit] Chapter 1[edit] Main articles: Revelation 1
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Authorship Of The Johannine Works
The authorship of the Johannine works—the Gospel of John, Epistles of John, and the Book
Book
of Revelation—has been debated by scholars since at least the 2nd century AD.[1] The main debate centers on who authored the writings, and which of the writings, if any, can be ascribed to a common author. There may have been a single author for the gospel and the three epistles.[2] Tradition attributes all the books to John the Apostle.[2] Most scholars agree that all three letters are written by the same author, although there is debate on who that author is.[3][4][5] Although some scholars conclude the author of the epistles was different from that of the gospel, all four works probably originated from the same community,[6] traditionally and plausibly attributed to Ephesus, c. 90-110, but perhaps, according to some scholars, from Syria.[7] Some scholars, however, argue that the apostle John wrote none of these works,[8][9] although others, notably J. A. T
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John The Apostle
John the Apostle
John the Apostle
(Aramaic: ܝܘܚܢܢ ܫܠܝܚܐ‎ Yohanān Shliḥā; Hebrew: יוחנן בן זבדי‬ Yohanan ben Zavdi; Koine Greek: Ιωάννης; Coptic: ⲓⲱⲁⲛⲛⲏⲥ or ⲓⲱ̅ⲁ; Latin: Ioannes; c. AD 6-100) was one of the Twelve Apostles
Apostles
of Jesus
Jesus
according to the New Testament, which refers to him as Ἰωάννης. Generally listed as the youngest apostle, he was the son of Zebedee
Zebedee
and Salome
Salome
or Joanna. His brother was James, who was another of the Twelve Apostles
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Disciple Whom Jesus Loved
The phrase "the disciple whom Jesus
Jesus
loved" (Greek: ὁ μαθητὴς ὃν ἠγάπα ὁ Ἰησοῦς, ho mathētēs hon ēgapā ho Iēsous) or, in John 20:2, the disciple beloved of Jesus
Jesus
(Greek: ὃν ἐφίλει ὁ Ἰησοῦς, hon ephilei ho Iēsous) is used six times in the Gospel
Gospel
of John,[1] but in no other New Testament
New Testament
accounts of Jesus
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John Of Patmos
John of Patmos
Patmos
(also called John the Revelator, John the Divine or John the Theologian; Greek: Ἰωάννης ὁ Θεολόγος, Coptic: ⲓⲱⲁⲛⲛⲏⲥ) are the suffixative descriptions given to the author named as John in the Book of Revelation, the apocalyptic text forming the final book of the New Testament. The text of Revelation states that John lives on Patmos, a Greek island where, by some, he is considered to be in exile as a result of anti-Christian persecution under the Roman emperor Domitian.[1][2] Since the Roman era, some Christians and historians have considered the Book of Revelation's writer to be John the Apostle
John the Apostle
(John the Evangelist), professed author of the Gospel
Gospel
of John
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First Epistle Of John
The First Epistle
Epistle
of John, often referred to as First John and written 1 John or I John, is the first of the Johannine epistles
Johannine epistles
of the New Testament, and the fourth of the catholic epistles. It is attributed to John the Evangelist, traditionally thought to be the author of the Gospel
Gospel
of John and the other two Johannine epistles. This epistle was probably written in Ephesus
Ephesus
in AD 95–110.[1] The work was written to counter docetism, which is the belief that Jesus did not come "in the flesh", but only as a spirit
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John The Presbyter
In the New Testament, a presbyter (Greek πρεσβύτερος: "elder") is a leader of a local Christian congregation. The word derives from the Greek presbyteros, which means elder or senior. The Greek word episkopos literally means overseer; it refers exclusively to the office of bishop
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