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Book
A book is a series of pages assembled for easy portability and reading, as well as the composition contained in it. The book's most common modern form is that of a codex volume consisting of rectangular paper pages bound on one side, with a heavier cover and spine, so that it can fan open for reading. Books have taken other forms, such as scrolls, leaves on a string, or strips tied together; and the pages have been of parchment, vellum, papyrus, bamboo slips, palm leaves, silk, wood, and other materials.[1] The contents of books are also called books, as are other compositions of that length. For instance, Aristotle's Physics, the constituent sections of the Bible, and even the Egyptian Book of the Dead
Book of the Dead
are called books independently of their physical form. Conversely, some long literary compositions are divided into books of varying sizes, which typically do not correspond to physically bound units
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Page (paper)
A page is one side of a leaf (or sheet) of paper, parchment or other material (or electronic media) in a book, magazine, newspaper, or other collection of sheets, on which text or illustrations can be printed, written or drawn, to create documents. It can be used as a measure of communicating general quantity of information ("That topic covers twelve pages") or more specific quantity ("there are 535 words in a standard page in standard font type")[1]Contents1 The page in typography 2 The page in English lexicon 3 The page in library science 4 The printed page in computing4.1 Printed page in Web5 ReferencesThe page in typography[edit] In a book, the side of a leaf one reads first is called the recto page, and the back side of that leaf is called the verso page. In a spread, one reads the verso page first and then reads the recto page of the next leaf. In English-language books, the recto page is on the right and the verso page is on the left
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Scroll
A scroll (from the Old French escroe or escroue), also known as a roll, is a roll of papyrus, parchment, or paper containing writing.[1]Contents1 Structure 2 History of scroll use 3 Rolls 4 Scotland 5 Replacement by the codex 6 Recent discovery 7 Modern technology 8 See also 9 References 10 External linksStructure[edit] A scroll is usually divided up into pages, which are sometimes separate sheets of papyrus or parchment glued together at the edges, or may be marked divisions of a continuous roll of writing material. The scroll is usually unrolled so that one page is exposed at a time, for writing or reading, with the remaining pages rolled up to the left and right of the visible page
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Media (communication)
Media are the collective communication outlets or tools used to store and deliver information or data.[1][2] It is either associated with communication media, or the specialized mass media communication businesses such as print media and the press, photography, advertising, cinema, broadcasting (radio and television), publishing[3] and point of sale.Contents1 Origin and definition 2 Electronic media 3 Social impact 4 Games as a medium for communication 5 See also 6 References 7 Further readingOrigin and definition[edit] The term media is defined as "one of the means or channels of general communication in society, as newspapers, radio, television etc.."[4] The beginning of human communication through designed channels, i.e. not vocalization or gestures, dates back to ancient cave paintings, drawn maps, and writing. The Persian Empire (centred on present-day Iran) played an important role in the field of communication
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Lists Of Writers
The following are lists of writers:Contents1 Lists by name 2 Lists by century 3 Lists of women writers and works 4 Lists by genre 5 Lists by ethnicity or nationality 6 Lists by language (non-English) 7 See also 8 External linksLists by name[edit] A – B – C – D – E – F – G – H – I – J – K – L – M – N – O – P – Q – R – S – T – U – V – W – X – Y – Z Lists by century[edit]Notable 20th-century writers 21st-century writersLists of women writers and works[edit]Main listWomen writersBy countryAlbanian women writers Algerian women writers Argentine women writers Austrian women writers Azerbaijani women writers Bangladeshi women writers Belgian women writers Bolivian women writers Bosnia and Herzegovina women writers Brazilian women writers Bulgarian women writers Chilean women writers Chinese women writers Colombian women writers Croatian women writers Cuban women writers Czech women
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Outline Of Literature
The following outline is provided as an overview of and topical guide to literature: Literature
Literature
– prose, written or oral, including fiction and non-fiction, drama, and poetry
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Literary Genre
A literary genre is a category of literary composition. Genres may be determined by literary technique, tone, content, or even (as in the case of fiction) length. The distinctions between genres and categories are flexible and loosely defined, often with subgroups. The most general genres in literature are (in loose chronological order) epic, tragedy,[1] comedy, and creative nonfiction.[citation needed] They can all be in the form of prose or poetry. Additionally, a genre such as satire, allegory or pastoral might appear in any of the above, not only as a subgenre (see below), but as a mixture of genres. Finally, they are defined by the general cultural movement of the historical period in which they were composed. Genre
Genre
should not be confused with age categories, by which literature may be classified as either adult, young adult, or children's
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Performance
Performance
Performance
is completion of a task with application of knowledge, skills and abilities.[1] In work place, performance or job performance means good ranking with the hypothesized conception of requirements of a task role, whereas citizenship performance means a set of individual activity/contribution (prosocial organizational behavior) that supports the organizational culture.[2][3] In the performing arts, a performance generally comprises an event in which a performer or group of performers present one or more works of art to an audience. Usually the performers participate in rehearsals beforehand. An effective performance is determined by competency of the performer - level of skill and knowledge
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Literary Magazine
A literary magazine is a periodical devoted to literature in a broad sense. Literary magazines usually publish short stories, poetry, and essays, along with literary criticism, book reviews, biographical profiles of authors, interviews and letters. Literary magazines are often called literary journals, or little magazines, terms intended to contrast them with larger, commercial magazines.[1]Contents1 History 2 Online literary magazines 3 Little magazines 4 See also 5 References 6 Further reading 7 External linksHistory[edit] Nouvelles de la république des lettres is regarded as the first literary magazine; it was established by Pierre Bayle
Pierre Bayle
in France
France
in 1684.[2] Literary magazines became common in the early part of the 19th century, mirroring an overall rise in the number of books, magazines, and scholarly journals being published at that time
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Sociology Of Literature
The sociology of literature is a subfield of the sociology of culture. It studies the social production of literature and its social implications. A notable example is Pierre Bourdieu's 1992 Les Règles de L'Art: Genèse et Structure du Champ Littéraire, translated by Susan Emanuel as Rules of Art: Genesis and Structure of the Literary Field (1996).Contents1 Classical sociology 2 Lukács and the theory of the novel 3 The Frankfurt School 4 The sociology of the avant-garde 5 The sociology of the book trade 6 Genetic structuralism 7 Sociocriticism 8 Neo-Marxian ideology critique 9 Bourdieu 10 The rise of the novel 11 Cultural materialism 12 World-systems theory 13 Recent developments 14 Notes 15 ReferencesClassical sociology[edit] None of the 'founding fathers' of sociology produced a detailed study of literature, but they did develop ideas that were subsequently applied to literature by others
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Tragicomedy
Tragicomedy
Tragicomedy
is a literary genre that blends aspects of both tragic and comic forms. Most often seen in dramatic literature, the term can variously describe either a tragic play which contains enough comic elements to lighten the overall mood or a serious play with a happy ending.[1]Contents1 Tragicomedy
Tragicomedy
in theatre1.1 Classical precedent 1.2 Renaissance
Renaissance
revivals1.2.1 Italy 1.2.2 England 1.2.3 Later developments2 See also 3 References 4 External links Tragicomedy
Tragicomedy
in theatre[edit] Classical precedent[edit]Tragic Comic masks of Ancient Greek theatre
Ancient Greek theatre
represented in the Hadrian's Villa
Hadrian's Villa
mosaic.There is no complete formal definition of tragicomedy from the classical age
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Epic Poetry
An epic poem, epic, epos, or epopee is a lengthy narrative poem, ordinarily concerning a serious subject containing details of heroic deeds and events significant to a culture or nation.[1] The ancient Indian Mahabharata
Mahabharata
is the longest epic written[2][3]. The Mahabharat is comprised of 100,000 śloka or over 200,000 verse lines (each shloka is a couplet), as well as long prose passages. At about 1.8 million words in total, the Mahābhārata is roughly ten times the length of the Iliad
Iliad
and the Odyssey
Odyssey
combined, or about four times the length of the Rāmāyaṇa[4]. Another type of epic poetry is epyllion (plural: epyllia), which is a brief narrative poem with a romantic or mythological theme. The term, which means "little epic", came into use in the nineteenth century
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Play (theatre)
A play is a form of literature written by a playwright, usually consisting of dialogue between characters, intended for theatrical performance rather than just reading. Plays are performed at a variety of levels, from Broadway, Off-Broadway, regional theater, to Community theatre, as well as university or school productions. There are rare dramatists, notably George Bernard Shaw, who have had little preference as to whether their plays were performed or read
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Palm-leaf Manuscript
Palm-leaf manuscripts are manuscripts made out of dried palm leaves. Palm leaves were used as writing materials in the Indian subcontinent and in Southeast Asia
Southeast Asia
dating back to the 5th century BCE,[1] and possibly much earlier.[2] Their use began in South Asia, and spread elsewhere, as texts on dried and smoke treated palm leaves of Borassus species (Palmyra palm) or the Ola leaf
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Wood
Wood
Wood
is a porous and fibrous structural tissue found in the stems and roots of trees and other woody plants. It is an organic material, a natural composite of cellulose fibers that are strong in tension and embedded in a matrix of lignin that resists compression. Wood
Wood
is sometimes defined as only the secondary xylem in the stems of trees,[1] or it is defined more broadly to include the same type of tissue elsewhere such as in the roots of trees or shrubs.[citation needed] In a living tree it performs a support function, enabling woody plants to grow large or to stand up by themselves. It also conveys water and nutrients between the leaves, other growing tissues, and the roots
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History Of Modern Literature
The history of literature in the Modern period
Modern period
in Europe begins with the Age of Enlightenment
Age of Enlightenment
and the conclusion of the
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