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Bono State
Bonoman
Bonoman
(Bono State) was a trading state created by the Abron (Brong) people. Bonoman
Bonoman
was a medieval Akan kingdom in what is now Brong-Ahafo (named after the Abron (Brong) and Ahafo Akans) on the peninsula Ashantiland
Ashantiland
and eastern Ivory Coast
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Ashanti People
Ashanti (/ˈæʃɑːnˈtiː/ ( listen)) are an ethnic group native to the Ashanti Region
Ashanti Region
of modern-day Ghana. The people of ashanti speak the Asante dialect
Asante dialect
of Twi
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Bonduku
Bondoukou
Bondoukou
(var. Bonduku, Bontuku) is a city in north-eastern Ivory Coast, 420 km northeast of Abidjan.[3] It is the seat of both Zanzan District
Zanzan District
and Gontougo
Gontougo
Region. It is also a commune and the seat of and a sub-prefecture of Bondoukou
Bondoukou
Department. Bondoukou
Bondoukou
is near the border with Ghana. Just across the border is the Ghanaian town of Sampa
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Carbon 14
Carbon-14, 14C, or radiocarbon, is a radioactive isotope of carbon with an atomic nucleus containing 6 protons and 8 neutrons. Its presence in organic materials is the basis of the radiocarbon dating method pioneered by Willard Libby
Willard Libby
and colleagues (1949) to date archaeological, geological and hydrogeological samples. Carbon-14
Carbon-14
was discovered on February 27, 1940, by Martin Kamen and Sam Ruben at the University of California Radiation Laboratory
University of California Radiation Laboratory
in Berkeley, California. Its existence had been suggested by Franz Kurie in 1934.[2] There are three naturally occurring isotopes of carbon on Earth: 99% of the carbon is carbon-12, 1% is carbon-13, and carbon-14 occurs in trace amounts, i.e., making up about 1 or 1.5 atoms per 1012 atoms of the carbon in the atmosphere
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Pottery
Pottery
Pottery
is the ceramic material which makes up pottery wares,[1] of which major types include earthenware, stoneware and porcelain. The place where such wares are made by a potter is also called a pottery (plural "potteries"). The definition of pottery used by the American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) is "all fired ceramic wares that contain clay when formed, except technical, structural, and refractory products."[2] Pottery
Pottery
is one of the oldest human inventions, originating before the Neolithic
Neolithic
period, with ceramic objects like the Gravettian
Gravettian
culture Venus of Dolní Věstonice
Venus of Dolní Věstonice
figurine discovered in the Czech Republic date back to 29,000–25,000 BC,[3] and pottery vessels that were discovered in Jiangxi, China, which date back to 18,000 BC
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Smoking Pipe
A smoking pipe is a device made to allow the user to inhale or taste smoke or vapor derived from the burning or vaporization of some substance. The most common form of these is the tobacco pipe, which is designed for use with tobacco, although the device itself may be used with many other substances. The pipes are manufactured with a variety of materials, the most common (as the popularity of its use): Briar, Heather, corn, meerschaum, clay, cherry, glass, porcelain, ebonite, acrylic and other more unusual materials
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Smelting
Smelting
Smelting
is a process of applying heat to ore in order to melt out a base metal. It is a form of extractive metallurgy. It is used to extract many metals from their ores, including silver, iron, copper, and other base metals. Smelting
Smelting
uses heat and a chemical reducing agent to decompose the ore, driving off other elements as gases or slag and leaving the metal base behind. The reducing agent is commonly a source of carbon, such as coke—or, in earlier times, charcoal. The carbon (or carbon monoxide derived from it) removes oxygen from the ore, leaving the elemental metal. The carbon thus oxidizes in two stages, producing first carbon monoxide and then carbon dioxide
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West Africa
West
West
Africa, also called Western Africa
Africa
and the West
West
of Africa, is the westernmost region of Africa
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Portugal
Portugal
Portugal
(Portuguese pronunciation: [puɾtuˈɣaɫ]), officially the Portuguese Republic
Republic
(Portuguese: República Portuguesa [ʁɛˈpuβlikɐ puɾtuˈɣezɐ]),[note 1] is a sovereign state located mostly on the Iberian Peninsula
Iberian Peninsula
in southwestern Europe. It is the westernmost country of mainland Europe, bordered to the west and south by the Atlantic Ocean
Atlantic Ocean
and to the north and east by Spain
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Mali Empire
The Mali
Mali
Empire
Empire
(Manding: Nyeni[5] or Niani; also historically referred to as the Manden Kurufaba,[1] sometimes shortened to Manden) was an empire in West Africa from c. 1230 to 1670. The empire was founded by Sundiata Keita
Sundiata Keita
and became renowned for the wealth of its rulers, especially Musa Keita. The Manding languages
Manding languages
were spoken in the empire. It was the largest empire in West Africa and profoundly influenced the culture of West Africa through the spread of its language, laws and customs.[6] Much of the recorded information about the Mali
Mali
Empire
Empire
comes from 14th century North African Arab
Arab
historian Ibn Khaldun, 14th century Moroccan traveller Ibn Battuta
Ibn Battuta
and 16th century Moroccan traveller Leo Africanus
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Dyula People
The Dyula (Dioula or Juula) are a Mande ethnic group inhabiting several West African
West African
countries, including the Mali, Cote d'Ivoire, Ghana,and Burkina Faso. Characterized as a highly successful merchant caste, Dyula migrants began establishing trading communities across the region in the fourteenth century. Since business was often conducted under non- Muslim
Muslim
rulers, the Dyula developed a set of theological principles for Muslim
Muslim
minorities in non- Muslim
Muslim
societies
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Soninke Wangara
The Wangara (also known as Wakore, Wankori, Ouankri, Wangarawa) were Soninke clans specialized in Silent Trade, scholarship from the University of Timbuktu and a type of Sharia
Sharia
law called the Suwarian Tradition. Teaching peaceful coexistence with non-Muslims. Similar to the Baqt with the Coptic Christian Nubians of Makuria. Particularly active in the Trans-Saharan trade
Trans-Saharan trade
of gold and slaves. They played a major role in spreading Islam
Islam
in the Western Sudan. A group of Mande traders, loosely associated with the Kingdoms of the Sahel
Sahel
region and other West African
West African
Empires
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Côte D'Ivoire
Coordinates: 8°N 5°W / 8°N 5°W / 8; -5 Republic
Republic
of Côte d'Ivoire République de Côte d'Ivoire (French)FlagCoat of armsMotto: "Union – Discipline – Travail" (French) "Unity – Discipline – Work"Anthem: L'Abidjanaise Song of AbidjanLocation of  Ivory Coast  (dark blue) in the African Union  (light blue)Capital
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Akan Languages
The Central Tano or Akan languages are languages of the Niger-Kongo family (or perhaps the theorised Kwa languages[2]) spoken in Ghana and Ivory Coast by the Akan people.Akan language (Akan proper) BiaNorth BiaAnyin Baoulé Chakosi (Anufo) Sefwi (Sehwi)South BiaNzema Ahanta Jwira-PepesaAll have written forms in the Latin script. References[edit]^ Hammarström, Harald; Forkel, Robert; Haspelmath, Martin, eds. (2017). "Central Tano". Glottolog 3.0. Jena, Germany: Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History.  ^ Ameka, Felix K.; Dakubu, Mary Esther Kropp (2008). Aspect and Modality in Kwa Languages. John Benjamins Publishing. ISBN 90-272-0567-1. , p
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Carbon Dating
Radiocarbon dating
Radiocarbon dating
(also referred to as carbon dating or carbon-14 dating) is a method for determining the age of an object containing organic material by using the properties of radiocarbon (14C), a radioactive isotope of carbon. The method was developed by Willard Libby
Willard Libby
in the late 1940s and soon became a standard tool for archaeologists. Libby received the Nobel Prize in Chemistry for his work in 1960. The radiocarbon dating method is based on the fact that radiocarbon is constantly being created in the atmosphere by the interaction of cosmic rays with atmospheric nitrogen. The resulting radiocarbon combines with atmospheric oxygen to form radioactive carbon dioxide, which is incorporated into plants by photosynthesis; animals then acquire 14C by eating the plants
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Wattle And Daub
Wattle and daub
Wattle and daub
is a composite building material used for making walls, in which a woven lattice of wooden strips called wattle is daubed with a sticky material usually made of some combination of wet soil, clay, sand, animal dung and straw. Wattle and daub
Wattle and daub
has been used for at least 6,000 years and is still an important construction material in many parts of the world
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