HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

picture info

Bolivia
Coordinates: 16°42′43″S 64°39′58″W / 16.712°S 64.666°W / -16.712; -64.666Plurinational State of BoliviaEstado Plurinacional de Bolivia  (Spanish) Tetã Hetãvoregua Volívia  (Guaraní) Buliwya Mamallaqta  (Quechua) Wuliwya Suyu  (Aymara)FlagCoat of armsMotto: "La Unión es la Fuerza" (Spanish) "Unity is Strength"[1]Anthem: Himno Nacional de Bolivia  (Spanish)Location of  Bolivia  (dark green) in South America  (grey)Capital Sucre
Sucre
[1]Largest city San
[...More...]

"Bolivia" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Ethnic Groups
An ethnic group, or an ethnicity, is a category of people who identify with each other based on similarities such as common ancestry, language, society, culture or nation.[1][2] Ethnicity is usually an inherited status based on the society in which one lives. Membership of an ethnic group tends to be defined by a shared cultural heritage, ancestry, origin myth, history, homeland, language or dialect, symbolic systems such as religion, mythology and ritual, cuisine, dressing style, art, and physical appearance. Ethnic groups, derived from the same historical founder population, often continue to speak related languages and share a similar gene pool
[...More...]

"Ethnic Groups" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Piro Language (Peru)
Language
Language
is a system that consists of the development, acquisition, maintenance and use of complex systems of communication, particularly the human ability to do so; and a language is any specific example of such a system. The scientific study of language is called linguistics. Questions concerning the philosophy of language, such as whether words can represent experience, have been debated at least since Gorgias
Gorgias
and Plato
Plato
in ancient Greece. Thinkers such as Rousseau
Rousseau
have argued that language originated from emotions while others like Kant have held that it originated from rational and logical thought. 20th-century philosophers such as Wittgenstein argued that philosophy is really the study of language. Major figures in linguistics include Ferdinand de Saussure and Noam Chomsky. Estimates of the number of human languages in the world vary between 5,000 and 7,000
[...More...]

"Piro Language (Peru)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Geographic Coordinate System
A geographic coordinate system is a coordinate system used in geography that enables every location on Earth to be specified by a set of numbers, letters or symbols.[n 1] The coordinates are often chosen such that one of the numbers represents a vertical position, and two or three of the numbers represent a horizontal position
[...More...]

"Geographic Coordinate System" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Ese Ejja Language
Language
Language
is a system that consists of the development, acquisition, maintenance and use of complex systems of communication, particularly the human ability to do so; and a language is any specific example of such a system. The scientific study of language is called linguistics. Questions concerning the philosophy of language, such as whether words can represent experience, have been debated at least since Gorgias
Gorgias
and Plato
Plato
in ancient Greece. Thinkers such as Rousseau
Rousseau
have argued that language originated from emotions while others like Kant have held that it originated from rational and logical thought. 20th-century philosophers such as Wittgenstein argued that philosophy is really the study of language. Major figures in linguistics include Ferdinand de Saussure and Noam Chomsky. Estimates of the number of human languages in the world vary between 5,000 and 7,000
[...More...]

"Ese Ejja Language" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Mestizo
Mestizo
Mestizo
(/mɛˈstiːzoʊ, mɪ-/;[1] Spanish: [mesˈtiθo], American Spanish: [-ˈtiso]) is a term traditionally used in Spain, Latin America, and to a lesser extent, in the Philippines
Philippines
which originally meant a person of combined European and American Indian descent, regardless of where the person was born. The term was used as an ethnic/racial category in the casta system that was in use during the Spanish Empire's control of their American colonies. Nowadays though, particularly in Latin America, Mestizo
Mestizo
has become more of a cultural term, with culturally mainstream Latin Americans regarded or termed as Mestizos regardless of their actual ancestry, and with the term "Indian" being reserved exclusively for people who have maintained a separate indigenous ethnic identity, language, tribal affiliation, etc
[...More...]

"Mestizo" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Uru-Chipaya
Uru–Chipaya is an indigenous language family of Bolivia. The speakers were originally fishermen on the shores of Lake Titicaca, Lake Poopo, and the Desaguadero River
Desaguadero River
that connects them. Chipaya has over a thousand speakers and sees vigorous use in the native community, but all other Uru languages or dialects are extinct. References[edit]^ Hammarström, Harald; Forkel, Robert; Haspelmath, Martin, eds. (2017). "Uru–Chipaya". Glottolog
Glottolog
3.0
[...More...]

"Uru-Chipaya" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Spanish Language
The Spanish language
Spanish language
(/ˈspænɪʃ/ ( listen);  Español (help·info)), also called the Castilian language[4] (/kæˈstɪliən/ ( listen),  castellano (help·info)), is a Western Romance language that originated in the Castile region of Spain
Spain
and today has hundreds of millions of native speakers in Latin
Latin
America and Spain. It is usually considered the world's second-most spoken native language, after Mandarin Chinese.[5][6][7][8][9] Spanish is a part of the Ibero-Romance group of languages, which evolved from several dialects of Vulgar Latin
Vulgar Latin
in Iberia after the collapse of the Western Roman Empire
Western Roman Empire
in the 5th century
[...More...]

"Spanish Language" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Itene Language
Itene is a Chapacuran
Chapacuran
language of Bolivia. References[edit]^ Itene at Ethnologue
Ethnologue
(18th ed., 2015) ^ Hammarström, Harald; Forkel, Robert; Haspelmath, Martin, eds. (2017). "Itene". Glottolog
Glottolog
3.0
[...More...]

"Itene Language" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Yaminawa Language
Yaminawa (Yaminahua) is a Panoan language
Panoan language
of western Amazonia. It is spoken by the Yaminawá
Yaminawá
and some related peoples. Yaminawa constitutes an extensive dialect cluster
[...More...]

"Yaminawa Language" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Chácobo Language
Chácobo-Pakawara is a Panoan language spoken by about 550 of 860 ethnic tribal Chácobo people of the Beni Department
Beni Department
of northwest of Magdalena, Bolivia, and (as of 2004) 17 of 50 Pakawara. Chácobo children are learning the language as a first language, but Pakawara is moribund.[6] Extinct Karipuna may have been a dialect; alternative names are Jaunavô (Jau-Navo) and Éloe.[7] Several extinct and unattested languages were reported to have been related, perhaps dialects. These include Capuibo and Sinabo/Shinabo of the Mamoré River
[...More...]

"Chácobo Language" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Pakawara Language
Chácobo-Pakawara is a Panoan language spoken by about 550 of 860 ethnic tribal Chácobo people of the Beni Department
Beni Department
of northwest of Magdalena, Bolivia, and (as of 2004) 17 of 50 Pakawara. Chácobo children are learning the language as a first language, but Pakawara is moribund.[6] Extinct Karipuna may have been a dialect; alternative names are Jaunavô (Jau-Navo) and Éloe.[7] Several extinct and unattested languages were reported to have been related, perhaps dialects. These include Capuibo and Sinabo/Shinabo of the Mamoré River
[...More...]

"Pakawara Language" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Mosetén Language
Chimané (Tsimané) is a South American language isolate. Some dialects are known as Mosetén (Mosetén of Santa Ana, Mosetén of Covendo). Chimane is a language of the western Bolivian lowlands spoken by the Tsimane peoples along the Beni River
Beni River
and the region around San Borja in the Department of Beni (Bolivia). Sakel (2004) [3] classifies them as two languages for a number of reasons, yet some of the variants of the language are mutually intelligible and they reportedly have no trouble communicating ( Ethnologue
Ethnologue
16) and were evidently a single language separated recently through cultural contact (Campbell 2000).Contents1 Classification 2 Writing system 3 References 4 External linksClassification[edit] Mosetenan has no obvious relatives among the languages of South America. There is some lexicon shared with Puquina and the Uru–Chipaya languages, but these appear to be borrowings
[...More...]

"Mosetén Language" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Chimán Language
Chimané (Tsimané) is a South American language isolate. Some dialects are known as Mosetén (Mosetén of Santa Ana, Mosetén of Covendo). Chimane is a language of the western Bolivian lowlands spoken by the Tsimane peoples along the Beni River and the region around San Borja in the Department of Beni (Bolivia). Sakel (2004) [3] classifies them as two languages for a number of reasons, yet some of the variants of the language are mutually intelligible and they reportedly have no trouble communicating (Ethnologue 16) and were evidently a single language separated recently through cultural contact (Campbell 2000).Contents1 Classification 2 Writing system 3 References 4 External linksClassification[edit] Mosetenan has no obvious relatives among the languages of South America. There is some lexicon shared with Puquina and the Uru–Chipaya languages, but these appear to be borrowings
[...More...]

"Chimán Language" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Puquina Language
Puquina (or Pukina) is an extinct language once spoken by a native ethnic group in the region surrounding Lake Titicaca
Lake Titicaca
( Peru
Peru
and Bolivia) and in the north of Chile. It is often associated with the culture that built Tiwanaku. Remnants of Puquina can be found in the Quechuan and Spanish languages spoken in the south of Peru, mainly in Arequipa, Moquegua
Moquegua
and Tacna, as well as in Bolivia. There also seem to be remnants in the Kallawaya language, which may be a mixed language formed from Quechuan languages and Puquina
[...More...]

"Puquina Language" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Yuracaré Language
Yuracaré (also Yurakaré, Yurakar, Yuracare, Yurucare, Yuracar, Yurakare, Yurujuré, Yurujare) is an endangered language isolate of central Bolivia in Cochabamba and Beni departments spoken by the Yuracaré people. There are approximately 2,500 speakers. These numbers are in decline as the youngest generation no longer learns the language.[3] (See Language death.) Yuracaré is documented with a grammar based on an old missionary manuscript by de la Cueva (Adam 1893). The language is currently being studied by Rik van Gijn. A Foundation for Endangered Languages grant was awarded for a Yuracaré–Spanish / Spanish–Yuracaré dictionary project in 2005.Contents1 Genealogical relations 2 Grammar 3 See also 4 Notes 5 External links5.1 BibliographyGenealogical relations[edit] Suárez (1977) suggests a relationship between Yuracaré and the Mosetenan, Pano–Tacanan, Arawakan, and Chon families
[...More...]

"Yuracaré Language" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
.