HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

picture info

Bleach Bypass
Bleach
Bleach
bypass, also known as skip bleach or silver retention, is an optical effect which entails either the partial or complete skipping of the bleaching function during the processing of a color film. By doing this, the silver is retained in the emulsion along with the color dyes. The result is a black-and-white image over a color image. The images usually have reduced saturation and exposure latitude, along with increased contrast and graininess. It usually is used to maximum effect in conjunction with a one-stop underexposure.Contents1 Technique 2 Use in movies 3 References 4 External linksTechnique[edit] Bleach
Bleach
bypass can be done to any photochemical step in the process, be it original camera negative, interpositive, internegative, or release print
[...More...]

"Bleach Bypass" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Janusz Kamiński
Janusz Zygmunt Kamiński, A.S.C. (Polish: [ˌjanuʂ kaˈmiɲskʲi]; born June 27, 1959) is a Polish[1] cinematographer and film director who started his career in the United States. He rose to fame in the 1990s with his innovative work on Schindler's List
Schindler's List
(1993). He has established a partnership with Steven Spielberg, working as a cinematographer on his movies since 1993.[4] He won the Academy Award for Best Cinematography for his work on Schindler's List
Schindler's List
and Saving Private Ryan (1998)
[...More...]

"Janusz Kamiński" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

Remi Adefarasin
Remi Adefarasin, OBE, BSC (born 2 February 1948, London) is an English cinematographer. He is educated in Photography & Filmmaking at Harrow Art School. He started his career as a camera trainee at BBC-TV's Ealing Studios
[...More...]

"Remi Adefarasin" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Cinematographer
A cinematographer or director of photography (sometimes shortened to DP or DOP) is the chief over the camera and light crews working on a film, television production or other live action piece and is responsible for making artistic and technical decisions related to the image. The study and practice of this field is referred to as cinematography. The cinematographer selects the camera, film stock, lenses, filters, etc., to realize the scene in accordance with the intentions of the director
[...More...]

"Cinematographer" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

Digital Intermediate
Digital intermediate (typically abbreviated to DI) is a motion picture finishing process which classically involves digitizing a motion picture and manipulating the color and other image characteristics.Contents1 Definition and overview 2 History 3 Milestones 4 See also 5 References 6 External linksDefinition and overview[edit] It often replaces or augments the photochemical timing process and is usually the final creative adjustment to a movie before distribution in theaters. It is distinguished from the telecine process in which film is scanned and color is manipulated early in the process to facilitate editing. However the lines between telecine and DI are continually blurred and are often executed on the same hardware by colorists of the same background. These two steps are typically part of the overall color management process in a motion picture at different points in time
[...More...]

"Digital Intermediate" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Color Grading
Color grading
Color grading
is the process of altering and enhancing the color of a motion picture, video image, or still image electronically, photo-chemically or digitally. Color grading
Color grading
encompasses both color correction and the generation of artistic color effects. Whether for theatrical film, video distribution, or print, color grading is generally now performed digitally in a color suite
[...More...]

"Color Grading" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Kon Ichikawa
Kon Ichikawa
Kon Ichikawa
(市川 崑, Ichikawa Kon, November 20, 1915 – February 13, 2008) was a Japanese film director.Contents1 Early life and career 2 1950–1965 3 After 1965 4 Legacy 5 Filmography 6 References 7 External linksEarly life and career[edit] Ichikawa was born in Ise, Mie
[...More...]

"Kon Ichikawa" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Daiei Film
Daiei Film
Film
Co. Ltd. (Kyūjitai: 大映映画株式會社 Shinjitai: 大映映画株式会社 Daiei eiga kabushiki gaisha) was a Japanese film studio. Founded in 1942 as Dai Nippon Film
Film
Co., Ltd., it was one of the major studios during the postwar Golden Age of Japanese cinema, producing not only artistic masterpieces such as Akira Kurosawa's Rashomon and Kenji Mizoguchi's Ugetsu, but also such popular film series as Gamera, Daimajin, Zatoichi and Yokai Monsters. It declared bankruptcy in 1971 and was acquired by Kadokawa Pictures.Contents1 History1.1 Origins 1.2 Golden era 1.3 Bankruptcy and after2 Filmography 3 See also 4 References 5 External linksHistory[edit] Origins[edit] Daiei Film
Film
was the product of government efforts to reorganize the film industry during World War II in order to rationalize use of resources and increase control over the medium
[...More...]

"Daiei Film" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Moby Dick (1956 Film)
Moby Dick is a 1956 film adaptation of Herman Melville's novel Moby-Dick. It was directed by John Huston
John Huston
with a screenplay by Huston and Ray Bradbury. The film starred Gregory Peck, Richard Basehart, and Leo Genn. The music score was written by Philip Sainton.Contents1 Plot 2 Cast 3 Production 4 Reception 5 Comic book adaptation 6 See also 7 Further reading 8 References 9 External linksPlot[edit] Set in 19th-century New England, the story follows the whaling ship Pequod and its crew. Leading them is Captain Ahab, who was almost killed in an encounter with the "great white whale", Moby Dick, which bit off much of his left leg. Now he is out for revenge
[...More...]

"Moby Dick (1956 Film)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Moby-Dick
Moby-Dick; or, The Whale is an 1851 novel by American writer Herman Melville. The book is sailor Ishmael's narrative of the obsessive quest of Ahab, captain of the whaling ship Pequod, for revenge on Moby Dick, the white whale that on the ship's previous voyage bit off Ahab's leg at the knee. A contribution to the literature of the American Renaissance, the work's genre classifications range from late Romantic to early Symbolist. Moby-Dick
Moby-Dick
was published to mixed reviews, was a commercial failure, and was out of print at the time of the author's death in 1891. Its reputation as a "Great American Novel" was established only in the 20th century, after the centennial of its author's birth. William Faulkner
William Faulkner
confessed he wished he had written the book himself,[1] and D. H. Lawrence
D. H

[...More...]

"Moby-Dick" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Roger Deakins
Academy Award
Academy Award
for Best Cinematography 2018 Blade Runner 2049 BAFTA Award for Best Cinematography 2008 No Country for Old Men 2011 True Grit Independent Spirit Award for Best Cinematography 1997 Fargo 2009 A Serious ManRoger Alexander Deakins, CBE, ASC, BSC (born May 24, 1949) is an English cinematographer best known for his work on the films of the Coen brothers, Sam Mendes, and Denis Villeneuve. Deakins is a member of both the American and British Society of Cinematographers. He received the 2011 American Society of Cinematographers (A.S.C.) Lifetime Achievement Award.[2] Its president, Richard Crudo, called Deakins "the pre-eminent cinematographer of our time."[3] In recognition of outstanding contribution to the British film industry, Deakins is an honorary fellow of the National Film School
National Film School
in Buckinghamshire of which he is an alumnus
[...More...]

"Roger Deakins" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

Rodrigo Prieto
Rodrigo Prieto (born November 23, 1965) is a Mexican cinematographer.Contents1 Life and career 2 Filmography 3 See also 4 References 5 External linksLife and career[edit] Rodrigo Prieto was born in Mexico City, Mexico. His grandfather, Jorge Prieto Laurens, was the mayor of Mexico City
Mexico City
and leader of the Chamber of Deputies of Mexico, but was later persecuted by the country's ruler because of political differences. Prieto's grandfather escaped with his family to Texas and then to Los Angeles. There, Prieto's father would spend most of his childhood. Prieto studied aeronautical engineering at New York University, where he met and married Prieto's mother, an art student. Rodrigo Prieto graduated from Centro de Capacitación Cinematográfica in Mexico City
[...More...]

"Rodrigo Prieto" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Darius Khondji
Darius Khondji, A.S.C. (Persian: داریوش خنجی‎; born 21 October 1955) is an Iranian-French cinematographer.[1]Contents1 Early life 2 Career 3 Creative inspiration 4 Personal life 5 Filmography 6 Awards and nominations 7 Exhibitions 8 References 9 External linksEarly life[edit] Khondji was born in Tehran, Iran, to an Iranian father and a French mother. At an early age, his family relocated in France. He became interested in film early on and made Super-8
Super-8
films in his teens.[2] Later in life, he moved to the United States
United States
to study at UCLA
UCLA
and then majored in film from New York University
New York University
and the International Center for Photography
[...More...]

"Darius Khondji" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Release Print
A release print is a copy of a film that is provided to a movie theater for exhibition.Contents1 Definitions 2 Workflow2.1 Photochemical 2.2 Digital intermediate3 Release print
Release print
stocks 4 Theatrical projection 5 Production and disposal 6 Gallery 7 ReferencesDefinitions[edit] Release prints are not to be confused with other types of print used in the photochemical post-production process:Rush prints are one-light, contact-printed copies made from an unedited roll of original camera negative immediately after processing and screened to the cast and crew in order to ensure that the takes can be used in the final film. Workprints, sometimes called cutting copies, are, like rush prints, copies of a camera negative roll
[...More...]

"Release Print" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

Dariusz Wolski
Dariusz Adam Wolski (born 7 May 1956) is a Polish film and music video cinematographer. He is best known for his work as the cinematographer on the Pirates of the Caribbean
Pirates of the Caribbean
film series and on Alex Proyas' cult classics The Crow and Dark City. Many of his collaborations include working with film directors like Ridley Scott, Rob Marshall, Tony Scott, Gore Verbinski
Gore Verbinski
and Tim Burton. He has been a member of the American Society of Cinematographers since 1996 and a member of the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences
Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences
since 2004
[...More...]

"Dariusz Wolski" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

Walter Carvalho
Walter Carvalho (born 1947 in João Pessoa, Paraíba, Brazil) is a critically and internationally acclaimed Brazilian cinematographer. Carvalho has worked on over 60 films in his career since entering the Cinema of Brazil in 1973. He has won some 30 different professional film awards to date and has worked on acclaimed Brazilian films such as Carandiru in 2003. He is the father of also cinematographer Lula Carvalho. Selected filmography[edit]Sergeant Getulio (1983) Central Station (1998) Midnight (1998) To the Left of the Father (2001) Madame Satã (2002) Mango Yellow (2002) Carandiru (2003) Cazuza – O Tempo Não Pára (2004) Heleno (2011)External links[edit]Walter Carvalho on IMDbAuthority controlWorldCat Identities VIAF: 85996100 LCCN: n98911029 GND: 137816421 SUDOC: 059621893 ULAN: 500339053 PIC: 289059This biographical article related to film in Brazil is a stub. You can help by expanding it.v t eThis article about a cinematographer is a stub
[...More...]

"Walter Carvalho" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse
.