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Blackbuck
A. c. cervicapra (Linnaeus, 1758) A. c. rajputanae Zukowsky, 1927SynonymsAntilope bezoartica Gray, 1850The blackbuck (/ˈblækˌbʌk/; Antilope cervicapra), also known as the Indian antelope, is an antelope found in India, Nepal
Nepal
and Pakistan. The blackbuck is the sole extant member of the genus Antilope. The species was described and given its binomial name by Swedish zoologist Carl Linnaeus
Carl Linnaeus
in 1758. Two subspecies are recognized. It stands up to 74 to 84 cm (29 to 33 in) high at the shoulder. Males weigh 20–57 kilograms (44–126 lb), an average of 38 kilograms (84 lb). Females are lighter, weighing 20–33 kilograms (44–73 lb) or 27 kilograms (60 lb) on an average. The long, ringed horns, 35–75 centimetres (14–30 in) long, are generally present only on males, though females may develop horns as well
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Diurnality
Diurnality
Diurnality
is a form of plant or animal behavior characterized by activity during the day, with a period of sleeping, or other inactivity, at night. The common adjective used for daytime activity is "diurnal". The timing of activity by an animal depends on a variety of environmental factors such as the temperature, the ability to gather food by sight, the risk of predation, and the time of year. Diurnality
Diurnality
is a cycle of activity within a twenty-four-hour period; cyclic activities called circadian rhythms are endogenous cycles not dependent on external cues or environmental factors. Animals active at dawn or dusk are crepuscular, those active at night are nocturnal, and animals active at sporadic times during both night and day are cathemeral. Plants that open their flowers during the day are referred to as diurnal, while those that bloom at night are nocturnal
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Habitat Destruction
Habitat
Habitat
destruction is the process in which natural habitat is rendered unable to support the species present. In this process, the organisms that previously used the site are displaced or destroyed, reducing biodiversity.[1] Habitat
Habitat
destruction by human activity is mainly for the purpose of harvesting natural resources for industrial production and urbanization. Clearing habitats for agriculture is the principal cause of habitat destruction. Other important causes of habitat destruction include mining, logging, trawling and urban sprawl
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Horn (anatomy)
A horn is a permanent pointed projection on the head of various animals consisting of a covering of keratin and other proteins surrounding a core of live bone. Horns are distinct from antlers, which are not permanent. In mammals, true horns are found mainly among the ruminant artiodactyls[not verified in body], in the families Antilocapridae
Antilocapridae
(pronghorn) and Bovidae
Bovidae
(cattle, goats, antelope etc.). One pair of horns is usual; however, two or more pairs occur in a few wild species and domesticated breeds of sheep. Polycerate (multi-horned) sheep breeds include the Hebridean, Icelandic, Jacob, Manx Loaghtan, and the Navajo-Churro. Horns usually have a curved or spiral shape, often with ridges or fluting. In many species only males have horns. Horns start to grow soon after birth, and continue to grow throughout the life of the animal (except in pronghorns, which shed the outer layer annually, but retain the bony core)
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Conservation Status
The conservation status of a group of organisms (for instance, a species) indicates whether the group still exists and how likely the group is to become extinct in the near future. Many factors are taken into account when assessing conservation status: not simply the number of individuals remaining, but the overall increase or decrease in the population over time, breeding success rates, and known threats
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Lekking
A lek, from the Swedish word for "play", is an aggregation of male animals gathered to engage in competitive displays, lekking, to entice visiting females which are surveying prospective partners for copulation.[1] Leks are commonly formed before or during the breeding season. A lekking species is characterised by male displays, strong female mate choice, and the conferring of male indirect benefits. Although most prevalent among birds such as black grouse, lekking is also found in insects including paper wasps, crustaceans, fishes, amphibians, reptiles and mammals. A classical lek consists of male territories in visual and auditory range of each other. An exploded lek, as seen in the kakapo (the owl parrot), has more widely separated territories, but still in auditory range. Lekking creates a paradox: strong sexual selection by females for specific male traits ought to erode genetic diversity by Fisherian runaway, but diversity is maintained and runaway does not occur
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Browsing (herbivory)
Browsing is a type of herbivory in which a herbivore (or, more narrowly defined, a folivore) feeds on leaves, soft shoots, or fruits of high-growing, generally woody, plants such as shrubs.[1] This is contrasted with grazing, usually associated with animals feeding on grass or other low vegetation. Alternatively, grazers are animals eating mainly grass, and browsers are animals eating mainly non-grasses, which include both woody and herbaceous dicots
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Sexually Mature
Sexual maturity is the capability of an organism to reproduce. It may be considered synonymous with adulthood,[1] but, in humans, puberty encompasses the process of sexual maturation and adulthood is based on cultural definitions.[1][2] Most multicellular organisms are unable to sexually reproduce at birth (or germination), and depending on the species, it may be days, weeks, or years until their bodies are able to do so. Also, certain cues may cause the organism to become sexually mature. They may be external, such as drought, or internal, such as percentage of body fat (such internal cues are not to be confused with hormones which directly produce sexual maturity). Sexual maturity is brought about by a maturing of the reproductive organs and the production of gametes. It may also be accompanied by a growth spurt or other physical changes which distinguish the immature organism from its adult form
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Extinct
In biology and ecology, extinction is the termination of an organism or of a group of organisms (taxon), normally a species. The moment of extinction is generally considered to be the death of the last individual of the species, although the capacity to breed and recover may have been lost before this point. Because a species' potential range may be very large, determining this moment is difficult, and is usually done retrospectively
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Bangladesh
Coordinates: 23°48′N 90°18′E / 23.8°N 90.3°E / 23.8; 90.3People's Republic
Republic
of Bangladeshগণপ্রজাতন্ত্রী বাংলাদেশ (Bengali) Gaṇaprajātantrī BāṃlādēśaFlagEmblemAnthem: "Amar Sonar Bangla" (Bengali) "My Golden Bengal"March: "Notuner Gaan" "The Song of Youth"[1]Government Seal of BangladeshCapital and largest city Dhaka 23°42′N 90°21′E / 23.700°N 90.350°E / 23.700; 90.350Official languages Bengali[2]Ethnic groups (2011[
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Deforestation
Deforestation, clearance, or clearing is the removal of a forest or stand of trees where the land is thereafter converted to a non-forest use.[2] Examples of deforestation include conversion of forestland to farms, ranches, or urban use. The most concentrated deforestation occurs in tropical rainforests.[3] About 30 percent of Earth's land surface is covered by forests.[4] Deforestation
Deforestation
occurs for multiple reasons: trees are cut down to be used for building or sold as fuel (sometimes in the form of charcoal or timber), while cleared land is used as pasture for livestock and plantation. The removal of trees without sufficient reforestation has resulted in habitat damage, biodiversity loss, and aridity. It has adverse impacts on biosequestration of atmospheric carbon dioxide. Deforestation
Deforestation
has also been used in war to deprive the enemy of vital resources and cover for its forces
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Argentina
Coordinates: 34°S 64°W / 34°S 64°W / -34; -64Argentine Republic[A] República Argentina  (Spanish)FlagCoat of armsMotto: "En unión y libertad" ("In Unity and Freedom")Anthem: Himno Nacional Argentino ("Argentine National Anthem")Sol de Mayo[2] (Sun of May)Location of  Argentina  (dark green) in South America  (grey)Capital and largest city Buenos Aires 34°36′S 58°23′W / 34.600°S 58.383°W / -34.600; -58.383Official languages NoneNational language Spanish[a]Regional languagesGuarani in Corrientes;[3] Qom, Mocoví and Wichí in Chaco[4]Religion77.1% Roman Catholicism 10.8% Protestant 10.1% Non-religious 2.6% Other[5]DemonymArgentine Argentinian Argentinean (uncommon)Government Federal presidential constitutional republic• PresidentMauricio Macri•
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Telugu Language
Spoken in these States and union territories of India:Andhra Pradesh Telangana Yanam Language codesISO 639-1teISO 639-2telISO 639-3tel – inclusive codeIndividual code:wbq – Waddar (Vadari)Glottologtelu1262  Telugu[2]oldt1249  Old Telugu[3]Linguasphere49-DBA-aaTelugu is native to Andhra Pradesh and TelanganaThis article contains IPA phonetic symbols. Without proper rendering support, you may see question marks, boxes, or other symbols instead of Unicode
Unicode
characters. For an introductory guide on IPA symbols, see Help:IPA. Telugu (English: /ˈtɛlʊɡuː/;[4] తెలుగు [teluɡu]) is a Dravidian language spoken in the Indian states of Andhra Pradesh, Telangana
Telangana
and the union territories of Puducherry (Yanam) by the Telugu people
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Wildlife Protection Act Of 1972
The Wildlife Protection Act, 1972
Wildlife Protection Act, 1972
is an Act of the Parliament of India enacted for protection of plants and animal species. Before 1972, India
India
only had five designated national parks. Among other reforms, the Act established schedules of protected plant and animal species; hunting or harvesting these species was largely outlawed. [1] The Act provides for the protection of wild animals, birds and plants; and for matters connected therewith or ancillary or incidental thereto. It extends to the whole of India, except the State of Jammu and Kashmir which has its own wildlife act. It has six schedules which give varying degrees of protection. Schedule I and part II of Schedule II provide absolute protection - offences under these are prescribed the highest penalties. Species listed in Schedule III and Schedule IV are also protected, but the penalties are much lower
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Hinduism
ArtsBharatanatyam Kathak Kathakali Kuchipudi Manipuri Mohiniyattam Odissi Sattriya Bhagavata Mela Yakshagana Dandiya Raas Carnatic musicRites of passageGarbhadhana Pumsavana Simantonayana Jatakarma Namakarana Nishkramana Annaprashana Chudakarana Karnavedha Vidyarambha Upanayana Keshanta Ritushuddhi Samavartana Vivaha AntyeshtiAshrama DharmaAshrama: Brahmacharya Grihastha Vanaprastha SannyasaFestivalsDiwali Holi Shivaratri Navaratri Durga
Durga
Puja Ramlila Vijayadashami-Dussehra


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Scientific Name
Binomial nomenclature
Binomial nomenclature
("two-term naming system") also called binominal nomenclature ("two-name naming system") or binary nomenclature, is a formal system of naming species of living things by giving each a name composed of two parts, both of which use Latin
Latin
grammatical forms, although they can be based on words from other languages. Such a name is called a binomial name (which may be shortened to just "binomial"), a binomen, binominal name or a scientific name; more informally it is also called a Latin
Latin
name. The first part of the name identifies the genus to which the species belongs; the second part – the specific name or specific epithet – identifies the species within the genus. For example, humans belong to the genus Homo
Homo
and within this genus to the species Homo
Homo
sapiens
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