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Birder
Birdwatching, or birding, is a form of wildlife observation in which the observation of birds is a recreational activity or citizen science. It can be done with the naked eye, through a visual enhancement device like binoculars and telescopes, by listening for bird sounds,[1][2] or by watching public webcams. Birdwatching
Birdwatching
often involves a significant auditory component, as many bird species are more easily detected and identified by ear than by eye
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Birdwatching (other)
Birdwatching
Birdwatching
is a recreational activity involving the observation of birds. Birdwatching
Birdwatching
may refer also to:Bird Watching (magazine), a British magazine established in 1986 Birdwatch (magazine), a British magazine established in 1992 Bird Watching (album), a 1961 al
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Audubon Society
The National Audubon Society
National Audubon Society
(Audubon) is a non-profit environmental organization dedicated to conservation. Located in the United States and incorporated in 1905, Audubon is one of the oldest of such organizations in the world and uses science, education and grassroots advocacy to advance its conservation mission. It is named in honor of John James Audubon, a Franco-American ornithologist and naturalist who painted, cataloged, and described the birds of North America in his famous book Birds of America published in sections between 1827 and 1838. The society has nearly 500 local chapters, each of which is an independent 501(c)(3) non-profit organization voluntarily affiliated with the National Audubon Society, which often organize birdwatching field trips and conservation-related activities
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Life List
A life list, or life-list, is a list of all biological species seen by a person. The phrase is particularly common among bird watchers,[1] some of whom compete with each other to have the most complete list.[2] References[edit]^ Porter, Diane (2007). "What Good Is a Life List?". www.birdwatching.com. Retrieved 24 April 2013.  ^ Conrad, Jim (12 October 2011). "The Life List". The Backyard Nature Website. Retrieved 24 April 2013. This biology article is a stub
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Gilbert White
Gilbert White
Gilbert White
FRS (18 July 1720 – 26 June 1793) was a "parson-naturalist", a pioneering English naturalist and ornithologist. He remained unmarried and a curate all his life. He is best known for his Natural History and Antiquities of Selborne.Contents1 Life 2 The Natural History and Antiquities of Selborne 3 Legacy 4 Works 5 References 6 Sources 7 External linksLife[edit]Gilbert White's house, The Wakes, now a museum, viewed from the back gardens, taken in September 2010White was born in his grandfather's vicarage at Selborne
Selborne
in Hampshire. He was educated at the Holy Ghost School [1] and by a private tutor in Basingstoke
Basingstoke
before going to Oriel College, Oxford
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Thomas Bewick
Thomas Bewick
Thomas Bewick
(c. 11 August 1753 – 8 November 1828) was an English engraver and natural history author. Early in his career he took on all kinds of work such as engraving cutlery, making the wood blocks for advertisements, and illustrating children's books. He gradually turned to illustrating, writing and publishing his own books, gaining an adult audience for the fine illustrations in A History of Quadrupeds. His career began when he was apprenticed to engraver Ralph Beilby in Newcastle upon Tyne. He became a partner in the business and eventually took it over
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George Montagu (naturalist)
George Montagu (1753 – 20 June 1815) was an English army officer and naturalist. He was known for his pioneering Ornithological Dictionary of 1802, which for the first time accurately defined the status of Britain's birds. He is remembered today for species such as the Montagu's harrier, named for him.Contents1 Life and work 2 Works 3 References 4 Sources 5 External linksLife and work[edit] George Montagu was born to James Montagu (1713–1790), who was great-great-grandson of Lord James Montagu (d. 1665), who was younger son of Henry Montagu, 1st Earl of Manchester.[1] Montagu is best known for his Ornithological Dictionary
Ornithological Dictionary
(1802) and his contributions to early knowledge of British birds. He showed that many previously accepted species were invalid, either because they were birds in summer or winter plumage or males and females of the same species
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John Clare
John Clare
John Clare
(13 July 1793 – 20 May 1864) was an English poet, the son of a farm labourer, who became known for his celebrations of the English countryside and sorrows at its disruption.[1] His poetry underwent major re-evaluation in the late 20th century: he is now often seen as one of the important 19th-century poets.[2] His biographer Jonathan Bate states that Clare was "the greatest labouring-class poet that England has ever produced. No one has ever written more powerfully of nature, of a rural childhood, and of the alienated and unstable self."[3]Contents1 Life1.1 Early life 1.2 Early poems 1.3 Midlife 1.4 Later life and death2 Poetry 3 Essays 4 Revived interest 5 John Clare
John Clare
Cottage 6 Poetry collections 7 Works about Clare 8 See also 9 References 10 External linksLife[edit] Early life[edit] Clare was born in Helpston, 6 miles (9.7 km) to the north of the city of Peterborough
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Victorian Era
In the history of the United Kingdom, the Victorian era
Victorian era
was the period of Queen Victoria's reign, from 20 June 1837 until her death on 22 January 1901. The era followed the Georgian period and preceded the Edwardian period, and its later half overlaps with the first part of the Belle Époque
Belle Époque
era of continental Europe. Defined according to sensibilities and political concerns, the period is sometimes considered to begin with the passage of the Reform Act 1832
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Bird Collections
Bird
Bird
collections are curated repositories of scientific specimens consisting of birds and their parts. They are a research resource for ornithology, the science of birds, and for other scientific disciplines in which information about birds is useful. These collections are archives of avian diversity and serve the diverse needs of scientific researchers, artists, and educators. Collections may include a variety of preparation types emphasizing preservation of feathers, skeletons, soft tissues, or (increasingly) some combination thereof. Modern collections range in size from small teaching collections, such as one might find at a nature reserve visitor center or small college, to large research collections of the world’s major natural history museums, the largest of which contain hundreds of thousands of specimens
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Colonialism
Colonialism
Colonialism
is the policy of a nation seeking to extend or retain its authority over other people or territories, generally with the aim of developing or exploiting them to the benefit of the colonizing country and helping the colonies modernize in terms defined by the colonizers, especially in economics, religion and health. The European colonial period was the era from the 15th century to 1914 when Spain, Portugal, Britain, Russia, France, the Netherlands, Germany, and several smaller European countries such a Belgium and Italy, established colonies outside Europe.[1] It has been estimated that by 1914, Europeans had gained control of 84% of the globe, and by 1800, before the Industrial Revolution
Industrial Revolution
had taken hold, they already controlled at least 35% (excluding Antarctica).[2] The system practically ended between 1945–1975 when nearly all colonies became independent
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Royal Society For The Protection Of Birds
The Royal Society for the Protection of Birds
Royal Society for the Protection of Birds
(RSPB) is a charitable organisation registered in England and Wales[3] and in Scotland.[4] It was founded as the Plumage
Plumage
League in 1889 by Emily Williamson
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Golden-winged Warbler
Helmintophila chrysoptera: Ridgway 1882The golden-winged warbler ( Vermivora
Vermivora
chrysoptera) is a New World warbler. It breeds in southeastern and south-central Canada and the Appalachian Mountains northeastern to north-central United States. The majority (~70%) of the global population breeds in Wisconsin, Minnesota, and Manitoba
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Edmund Selous
Edmund Selous
Edmund Selous
(14 August 1857 – 25 March 1934) was a British ornithologist and writer. He was the younger brother of big-game hunter Frederick Selous. Born in London, the son of a wealthy stockbroker, Selous was educated privately and matriculated at Pembroke College, Cambridge
Pembroke College, Cambridge
in September 1877. He left without a degree and was admitted to the Middle Temple
Middle Temple
just over a year later and was called to the bar in 1881. He practised as a barrister only briefly before retiring to pursue the study of natural history and literature. He married in 1886 and moved to Wiesbaden, Germany with his family in 1888 and then to Mildenhall in Suffolk in 1889
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Neltje Blanchan
Neltje Blanchan
Neltje Blanchan
De Graff Doubleday (October 23, 1865 – February 21, 1918) was a United States scientific historian and nature writer who published several books on wildflowers and birds under the pen name Neltje Blanchan.[1] Her work is known for its synthesis of scientific interest with poetic phrasing.Contents1 Early life and education 2 Marriage and family 3 Writing career 4 Community service 5 Legacy and honors 6 Published works 7 See also 8 References 9 External linksEarly life and education[edit] Neltje Blanchan
Neltje Blanchan
De Graff was born in Chicago to Liverius De Graff, a proprietor of a men's clothing store, and his wife Alice Fair. She was educated at St
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American Ornithologists' Union
The American Ornithological Society
American Ornithological Society
(AOS) is an ornithological organization based in the United States. The society was formed in October 2016 by the merger of the American Ornithologists' Union (AOU) and the Cooper Ornithological Society.[1] Its members are primarily professional ornithologists although membership is open to anyone with an interest in birds
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