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Bird Of Prey
A bird of prey, predatory bird, or raptor is any of several species of bird that hunts and feeds on rodents and other small animals
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Owls
Strigidae Tytonidae Ogygoptyngidae (fossil) Palaeoglaucidae (fossil) Protostrigidae (fossil) Sophiornithidae (fossil)Range of the owl, all species.SynonymsStrigidae sensu Sibley & AhlquistOwls are birds from the order Strigiformes, which includes about 200 species of mostly solitary and nocturnal birds of prey typified by an upright stance, a large, broad head, binocular vision, binaural hearing, sharp talons, and feathers adapted for silent flight. Exceptions include the diurnal northern hawk-owl and the gregarious burrowing owl. Owls hunt mostly small mammals, insects, and other birds, although a few species specialize in hunting fish
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Buzzards
Buzzard is the common name of several species of bird of prey: Buteo species[edit]Archer's buzzard, (Buteo archeri) Augur buzzard, (Buteo augur) Broad-winged hawk (Buteo platypterus ) Common buzzard (Buteo buteo) Eastern buzzard (Buteo japonicus) Ferruginous hawk (Buteo regalis) Galápagos hawk (Buteo galapagoensis) Grey hawk (Buteo plagiatus) Grey-lined hawk (Buteo nitidus) Hawaiian hawk (Buteo solitarius) Jackal buzzard (Buteo rufofuscus) Long-legged buzzard (Buteo rufinus) Madagascar buzzard (Buteo brachypterus) Mountain buzzard (Buteo oreophilus) Puna hawk (Buteo poecilochrous) Red-backed hawk (Buteo polyosoma) Red-necked buzzard (Buteo auguralis) Red-shouldered hawk (Buteo lineatus) Red-tailed hawk (Buteo jamaicensis) Ridgway's hawk (Buteo ridgwayi) Roadside hawk (Buteo magnirostris) Rough-legged buzzard (Buteo lagopus) Rufous-tailed hawk (Buteo ventralis) Short-tailed hawk (Buteo brachyurus) Swainson's hawk (Buteo swainsoni) Upland buzzard (Buteo hemilasius) White-rumped h
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Gull
11, see textFlying subadult silver gulls at Kiama beach, Sydney during Christmas 2013Gulls or seagulls are seabirds of the family Laridae
Laridae
in the suborder Lari. They are most closely related to the terns (family Sternidae) and only distantly related to auks, skimmers, and more distantly to the waders. Until the 21st century, most gulls were placed in the genus Larus, but this arrangement is now considered polyphyletic, leading to the resurrection of several genera.[1] An older name for gulls is mews, cognate with German Möwe, Danish måge, Dutch meeuw, and French mouette; this term can still be found in certain regional dialects.[2][3][4] Gulls are typically medium to large birds, usually grey or white, often with black markings on the head or wings. They typically have harsh wailing or squawking calls; stout, longish bills; and webbed feet
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Skua
See text.The skuas /ˈskjuːə/ are a group of seabirds with about seven species forming the family Stercorariidae and the genus Stercorarius. The three smaller skuas are called jaegers in American English. The English word "skua" comes from the Faroese name skúgvur [ˈskɪkvʊər] for the great skua, with the island of Skúvoy renowned for its colony of that bird. The general Faroese term for skuas is kjógvi [ˈtʃɛkvə]. The word "jaeger" is derived from the German word Jäger, meaning "hunter".[1][2] The genus name Stercorarius is Latin and means "of dung"; the food disgorged by other birds when pursued by skuas was once thought to be excrement.[3] Skuas nest on the ground in temperate and Arctic regions, and are long-distance migrants. They have even been sighted at the South Pole.[4]Contents1 Biology and habits 2 Taxonomy 3 Species 4 References 5 External linksBiology and habits[edit] Outside the breeding season, skuas take fish, offal, and carrion
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Telluraves
Telluraves (also called land birds or core landbirds) is a recently defined[1] clade of birds with controversial content
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Vertebrate
Fire salamander
Fire salamander
(Amphibia), saltwater crocodile (Reptilia), southern cassowary (Aves), black-and-rufous giant elephant shrew (Mammalia), ocean sunfish (Osteichthyes)Scientific classification Kingdom: AnimaliaPhylum: ChordataClade: CraniataSubphylum: Vertebrata J-B
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Carrion
Carrion
Carrion
(from Latin
Latin
caro, meaning "meat") is the decaying flesh of a dead animal. Overview[edit] Carrion
Carrion
is an important food source for large carnivores and omnivores in most ecosystems. Examples of carrion-eaters (or scavengers) include vultures, hawks, eagles,[1] hyenas,[2] Virginia opossum,[3] Tasmanian devils,[4] coyotes,[5] and Komodo dragons.[6] Many invertebrates such as the carrion and burying beetles,[7] as well as maggots of calliphorid flies and flesh-flies also eat carrion, playing an important role in recycling nitrogen and carbon in animal remains.Play mediaZoarcid fish feeding on the carrion of a mobulid ray. Carrion
Carrion
begins to decay the moment of the animal's death, and it will increasingly attract insects and breed bacteria
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Kite (bird)
Kite is a common name for certain birds of prey in the family Accipitridae, particularly in subfamilies Milvinae, Elaninae, and Perninae.[1] Some authors use the terms "hovering kite" and "soaring kite" to distinguish between Elanus
Elanus
and the milvine kites, respectively.[according to whom?] The groups may also be differentiated by size, referring to milvine kites as "large kites", and elanine kites as "small kites".Contents1 Species 2 Taxonomy and systematics2.1 19th century 2.2 20th century 2.3 21st century3 In mythology 4 References 5 External linksSpecies[edit]


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Insect
See text.SynonymsEctognatha EntomidaInsects or Insecta (from Latin
Latin
insectum) are by far the largest group of hexapod invertebrates within the arthropod phylum. Definitions and circumscriptions vary; usually, insects comprise a class within the Phylum
Phylum
Arthropoda. As used here, the term is synonymous with Ectognatha. Insects have a chitinous exoskeleton, a three-part body (head, thorax and abdomen), three pairs of jointed legs, compound eyes and one pair of antennae
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Grassland
Grasslands are areas where the vegetation is dominated by grasses (Poaceae); however, sedge (Cyperaceae) and rush (Juncaceae) families can also be found along with variable proportions of legumes, like clover, and other herbs. Grasslands occur naturally on all continents except Antarctica. Grasslands are found in most ecoregions of the Earth
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Ornithology
Ornithology
Ornithology
is a branch of zoology that concerns the study of birds. The word "ornithology" derives from the ancient Greek ὄρνις ornis ("bird") and λόγος logos ("rationale" or "explanation"). Several aspects of ornithology differ from related disciplines, due partly to the high visibility and the aesthetic appeal of birds.[1] Most marked among these is the extent of studies undertaken by amateurs working within the parameters of strict scientific methodology. The science of ornithology has a long history and studies on birds have helped develop several key concepts in evolution, behaviour and ecology such as the defin
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Marsh
A marsh is a wetland that is dominated by herbaceous rather than woody plant species.[1] Marshes can often be found at the edges of lakes and streams, where they form a transition between the aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems. They are often dominated by grasses, rushes or reeds.[2] If woody plants are present they tend to be low-growing shrubs
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Eastern Hemisphere
The Eastern Hemisphere
Eastern Hemisphere
is a geographical term for the half of Earth which is east of the prime meridian (which crosses Greenwich, London) and west of the antimeridian. It is also used to refer to Afro-Eurasia ( Africa
Africa
and Eurasia) and Australia, in contrast with the Western Hemisphere, which includes mainly North and South America. This hemisphere may also be called the "Oriental Hemisphere". In addition, it may be used in a cultural or geopolitical sense as a synonym for the "Old World".Contents1 Geography 2 Demographics 3 References 4 External linksGeography[edit] The line demarcating the Eastern and Western Hemispheres is an arbitrary convention, unlike the Equator
Equator
(an imaginary line encircling Earth, equidistant from its poles), which divides the Northern and Southern Hemispheres
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Western Hemisphere
The Western Hemisphere
Western Hemisphere
is a geographical term[1][2] for the half of Earth
Earth
which lies west of the prime meridian (which crosses Greenwich, London, United Kingdom) and east of the antimeridian
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Falcon
About 37; see text.SynonymsAesalon Lithofalco Tinnunculus Linnaeus, 1766 Hierofalco Cuvier, 1817 Cerchneis Boie, 1826 Hypotriorchis Boie, 1826 Rhynchodon Nitzsch, 1829 Ieracidea Gould, 1838 Hieracidea Strickland, 1841 (unjustified emendation)[verification needed] Gennaia Kaup, 1847 Jerafalco Kaup, 1850 (unjustified emendation) Harpe Bonaparte, 1855 (non Lacepède 1802[verification needed]: preoccupied) Dissodectes Sclater, 1864 Genaïe Heuglin, 1867 (unjustified emendation)[verification needed] Harpa Sharpe, 1874 (non Pallas 1774: preoccupied) Gennadas Heine & Reichenow, 1890[verification needed] (unjustified emendation)[verification needed] Nesierax Oberholser, 1899 Nesihierax Dubois, 1902 (unjustified emendation) Asturaetus De Vis, 1906 (non Asturaetos Brehm 1855: preoccupied) Plioaetus Richmond, 1908 Sushkinia Tugarinov, 1935 (non Martynov 1930: preoccupied) – see belowFalcons (/ˈfɒlkən, ˈfɔːl-, ˈfæl-/) are birds of prey in the genus Falco, which i
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