HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

picture info

Bilad Al-Sham
Bilad al-Sham
Bilad al-Sham
(Arabic: بِـلَاد الـشَّـام‎ Bilād a'š-Šām) was a Rashidun, Umayyad and later Abbasid Caliphate province in what is now the region of Syria. It incorporated former Byzantine
Byzantine
territories of the Diocese of the East, organized soon after the Muslim conquest of Syria
Muslim conquest of Syria
in the mid-7th century, which was completed at the decisive Battle of Yarmouk
[...More...]

"Bilad Al-Sham" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Mount Lebanon Mutasarrifate
FlagThe Mutasarrifate in 1914Capital Deir el Qamar[1]History •  Established 1861 •  French occupation 1918Population •  1870[2] 110,000 Today part of  LebanonThe Mount Lebanon
Lebanon
Mutasarrifate[3][4][5] (Arabic: متصرفية جبل لبنان‎; Turkish: Cebel-i Lübnan Mutasarrıflığı) was one of the Ottoman Empire's subdivisions following the Tanzimat reform
[...More...]

"Mount Lebanon Mutasarrifate" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

Nabataeans
The Nabataeans, also Nabateans (/ˌnæbəˈtiːənz/; Arabic: الأنباط‎ al-ʾAnbāṭ , compare Ancient Greek: Ναβαταῖος, Latin: Nabataeus), were an Arab[1][2][3][4][5][6][7] people who inhabited northern Arabia and the Southern Levant. Their settlements, most prominently the assumed capital city of Raqmu, now called Petra,[1] gave the name of Nabatene to the borderland between Arabia and Syria, from the Euphrates to the Red Sea. Their loosely controlled trading network, which centered on strings of oases that they controlled, where agriculture was intensively practiced in limited areas, and on the routes that linked them, had no securely defined boundaries in the surrounding desert. Trajan conquered the Nabataean kingdom, annexing it to the Roman Empire, where their individual culture, easily identified by their characteristic finely potted painted ceramics, was adopted into the larger Greco-Roman culture
[...More...]

"Nabataeans" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Amorite
The Amorites
Amorites
(/ˈæməˌraɪts/; Sumerian 𒈥𒌅 MAR.TU; Akkadian Tidnum or Amurrūm; Egyptian Amar; Hebrew אמורי ʼĔmōrī; Ancient Greek: Ἀμορραῖοι) were an ancient Semitic-speaking people[1] from Syria
Syria
who also occupied large parts of southern Mesopotamia
Mesopotamia
from the 21st century BC to the end of the 17th century BC, where they established several prominent city states in existing locations, notably Babylon, which was raised from a small town to an independent state and a major city
[...More...]

"Amorite" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Hittites
The Hittites
Hittites
(/ˈhɪtaɪts/) were an Ancient Anatolian people who established an empire centered on Hattusa
Hattusa
in north-central Anatolia around 1600 BC. This empire reached its height during the mid-14th century BC under Suppiluliuma I, when it encompassed an area that included most of Anatolia
Anatolia
as well as parts of the northern Levant
Levant
and Upper Mesopotamia. Between the 15th and 13th centuries BC the Hittite Empire
Empire
came into conflict with the Egyptian Empire, Middle Assyrian Empire
Empire
and the empire of the Mitanni
Mitanni
for control of the Near East. The Assyrians eventually emerged as the dominant power and annexed much of the Hittite empire, while the remainder was sacked by Phrygian newcomers to the region. After c
[...More...]

"Hittites" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Neo-Babylonian Empire
The Neo-Babylonian Empire
Empire
was a period of Mesopotamian history which began in 626 BC and ended in 539 BC.[1] During the preceding three centuries, Babylonia
Babylonia
had been ruled by their fellow Akkadian
Akkadian
speakers and northern neighbours, Assyria. A year after the death of the last strong Assyrian ruler, Assurbanipal, in 627 BC, the Assyrian empire spiralled into a series of brutal civil wars. Babylonia
Babylonia
rebelled under Nabopolassar. In alliance with the Medes, Persians, Scythians
Scythians
and Cimmerians, they sacked the city of Nineveh
Nineveh
in 612 BC, and the seat of empire was transferred to Babylonia
Babylonia
for the first time since the death of Hammurabi
Hammurabi
in the mid 18th century BC
[...More...]

"Neo-Babylonian Empire" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Achaemenid Empire
The Achaemenid Empire
Empire
(/əˈkiːmənɪd/ c. 550–330 BC), also called the First Persian Empire,[11] was an empire based in Western Asia, founded by Cyrus the Great. Ranging at its greatest extent from the Balkans
Balkans
and Eastern Europe
Eastern Europe
proper in the west to the Indus Valley in the east, it was larger than any previous empire in history, spanning 5.5 million square kilometers. Incorporating various peoples of different origins and faiths, it is notable for its successful model of a centralised, bureaucratic administration (through satraps under the King of Kings), for building infrastructure such as road systems and a postal system, the use of an official language across its territories, and the development of civil services and a large professional army
[...More...]

"Achaemenid Empire" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Wars Of Alexander The Great
The wars of Alexander the Great
Alexander the Great
were fought by King Alexander III of Macedon
Macedon
("The Great"), first against the Achaemenid Persian Empire under Darius III, and then against local chieftains and warlords as far east as Punjab, India. Alexander the Great
Alexander the Great
was one of the most successful military commanders of all time. He was undefeated in battle
[...More...]

"Wars Of Alexander The Great" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Seleucid Empire
The Seleucid Empire
Empire
(/sɪˈljuːsɪd/;[6] Ancient Greek: Βασιλεία τῶν Σελευκιδῶν, Basileía tōn Seleukidōn) was a Hellenistic
Hellenistic
state ruled by the Seleucid dynasty, which existed from 312 BC to 63 BC; Seleucus I Nicator
Seleucus I Nicator
founded it following the division of the Macedonian empire vastly expanded by Alexander the Great.[7][8][9][10] Seleucus received Babylonia
Babylonia
(321 BC), and from there, expanded his dominions to include much of Alexander's near-eastern territories
[...More...]

"Seleucid Empire" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Roman Empire
Mediolanum
Mediolanum
(286–402, Western) Augusta Treverorum Sirmium Ravenna
Ravenna
(402–476, Western)
[...More...]

"Roman Empire" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Ghassulian
Near East Ghassulian
Ghassulian
culture, Naqada culture, Uruk periodEuropeYamna culture, Corded Ware Cernavodă culture, Decea Mureşului culture, Gorneşti culture, Gumelniţa–Karanovo culture, Petreşti culture, Coțofeni culture Remedello culture, Gaudo culture, Monte Claro cultureCentral AsiaYamna culture, Botai culture, BMAC culture, Afanasevo cultureSouth AsiaPeriodisation of the Indus Valley Civilisation, Bhirrana
Bhirrana
culture, Hakra Ware culture, Kaytha
Kaytha
culture, Ahar-Banas culture Savalda Culture, Malwa culture, Jorwe cultureChina MesoamericaMetallurgy, Wheel, Domestication of the horse↓ Bronze Agev t e Ghassulian
Ghassulian
ossuary, ca
[...More...]

"Ghassulian" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Byzantine Empire
The Byzantine
Byzantine
Empire, also referred to as the Eastern Roman Empire, was the continuation of the Roman Empire
Roman Empire
in the East during Late Antiquity and the Middle Ages, when its capital city was Constantinople
Constantinople
(modern-day Istanbul, which had been founded as Byzantium). It survived the fragmentation and fall of the Western Roman Empire
Roman Empire
in the 5th century AD and continued to exist for an additional thousand years until it fell to the Ottoman Turks in 1453.[2] During most of its existence, the empire was the most powerful economic, cultural, and military force in Europe
[...More...]

"Byzantine Empire" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Sassanid Empire
Temporarily controlled during the Byzantine– Sasanian
Sasanian
War of 602–628:  Abkhazia[12]  Russia (  Dagestan
Dagestan
and  Chechnya)  Turkey  Lebanon  Israel   Palestinian National Authority
Palestinian National Authority
( West Bank
West Bank
and Gaza strip)[13]  Jordan  EgyptPart of a series on theHistory of IranMythological historyPishdadian dynasty Kayanian dynastyAncient periodBCPrehistory of Iran Ancient Times–4000Kura–Araxes culture 3400–2000Proto-Elamite 3200–2700Jiroft culture c. 3100 – c. 2200Elam 2700–539 Akkadian
Akkadian
Empire 2400–2150Kassites c. 1500 – c
[...More...]

"Sassanid Empire" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Fatimid Caliphate
The Fatimid
Fatimid
Caliphate
Caliphate
(Arabic: الفاطميون‎, al-Fāṭimīyūn) was an Ismaili
Ismaili
Shia
Shia
Islamic caliphate that spanned a large area of North Africa, from the Red Sea
Red Sea
in the east to the Atlantic Ocean
Atlantic Ocean
in the west. The dynasty of Arab origin[4][5] ruled across the Mediterranean
Mediterranean
coast of Africa and ultimately made Egypt
Egypt
the centre of the caliphate. At its height the caliphate included in addition to Egypt
Egypt
varying areas of the Maghreb, Sudan, Sicily, the Levant, and Hijaz. The Fatimids
Fatimids
claimed descent from Fatimah, the daughter of Islamic prophet Muhammad
[...More...]

"Fatimid Caliphate" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

Seljuks
Seljuk beg (سلجوق‬ Saljūq; also romanized Seldjuk, Seldjuq, Seljuq; modern Turkish: Selçuk; died c. 1038) was an Oghuz Turkic warlord, eponymous founder of the Seljuk dynasty. He was the son of a certain Toqaq surnamed Temür Yalığ (meaning "of the iron bow") and either the chief or an eminent member of the Oghuz Kınık tribe. In 985, the Seljuq clan split off from the bulk of the Tokuz-Oghuz,[1] a confederacy of nine clans long settled between the Aral and Caspian Seas.[2] They set up camp on the right bank of the lower Syr Darya (Jaxartes), in the direction of Jend, near Kzyl Orda
Kzyl Orda
in present-day south-central Kazakhstan
[...More...]

"Seljuks" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Crusades
After 1291Smyrniote 1343–1351 Alexandrian 1365 Savoyard 1366 Barbary 1390 Nicopolis 1396 Varna
Varna
1443 Portuguese 1481 Northern Crusades
Northern Crusades
(1147–1410)Wendish 1147 Swedish<
[...More...]

"Crusades" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse
.