HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff

picture info

Big Red Switch
A kill switch, also known as an emergency stop (e-stop) and as an emergency power off (EPO), is a safety mechanism used to shut off machinery in an emergency, when it cannot be shut down in the usual manner. Unlike a normal shut-down switch or shut-down procedure, which shuts down all systems in order and turns off the machine without damage, a kill switch is designed and configured to abort the operation as quickly as possible (even if it damages the equipment) and to be operated simply and quickly (so that even a panicked operator with impaired executive functions or a by-stander can activate it). Kill switches are usually designed to be noticeable, even to an untrained operator or a bystander. Most kill switches feature a Mollyguard, a removable, protective barrier against accidental activation (e.g. a plastic cover that must be lifted or glass that must be broken)
[...More...]

Kill Switch (other)
A kill switch is a security measure used to shut off a device in an emergency. Kill switch
Kill switch
or killswitch may also refer to:Contents1 Art, entertainment, and media1.1 Film 1.2 Literature 1.3 Music 1.4 Television 1.5 Videogames2 Computing and technology 3 SportsArt, entertainment, and media[edit] Film[edit]Kill Switch (2008 film), a 2008 film starring Steven Seagal Kill Switch (2017 film) Killswitch (film), a 2014 documentary film by Akorn and CineCity Pictures, about the battle to control the InternetLiterature[edit]The Kill Switch
[...More...]

picture info

Fuel Dispenser
A fuel dispenser is a machine at a filling station that is used to pump gasoline, petrol, diesel, CNG, CGH2, HCNG, LPG, LH2, ethanol fuel, biofuels like biodiesel, kerosene, or other types of fuel into vehicles. Fuel
Fuel
dispensers are also known as bowsers (in Australia),[1] petrol pumps (in Commonwealth countries), or gas pumps (in North America).Contents1 History 2 Design2.1 Fuel
Fuel
nozzles 2.2 Blending 2.3 Flow measurement 2.4 The metrology of gasoline 2.5 The metrology of hydrogen 2.6 Communications components 2.7 Automatic cut-off in fuel dispenser 2.8 Other components 2.9 Early designs3 Regulations 4 Unicode 5 See also 6 References 7 External linksHistory[edit] The first gasoline pump was invented and sold by Sylvanus Bowser
Sylvanus Bowser
in Fort Wayne, Indiana
Fort Wayne, Indiana
on September 5, 1885.[2] This pump was not used for automobiles, as they were not yet being sold
[...More...]

picture info

Gnome Omega
The Gnome 7 Omega (commonly called the Gnome 50 hp) is a French seven-cylinder, air-cooled aero engine produced by Gnome et Rhône.[2] It was shown at the Paris Aero Salon held in December 1908 and was first flown in 1909. It was the world's first[1] aviation rotary engine produced in quantity. Its introduction revolutionized the aviation industry[3] and it was used by many early aircraft. It produced 50 horsepower (37 kW) from its capacity of 8 litres (488 cubic inches).[4] A Gnome Omega
Gnome Omega
engine powers the 1912 Blackburn Monoplane, owned and operated by the Shuttleworth Collection, the oldest known airworthy British-designed aeroplane worldwide.[5] A two-row version of the same engine was also produced, known as the Gnome 14 Omega-Omega or Gnome 100 hp
[...More...]

picture info

Aviation In World War I
World War I
World War I
was the first major conflict involving the large-scale use of aircraft. Tethered observation balloons had already been employed in several wars, and would be used extensively for artillery spotting. Germany employed Zeppelins for reconnaissance over the North Sea
North Sea
and Baltic and also for strategic bombing raids over Britain and the Eastern Front. Aeroplanes were just coming into military use at the outset of the war. Initially, they were used mostly for reconnaissance. Pilots and engineers learned from experience, leading to the development of many specialized types, including fighters, bombers, and trench strafers. Ace fighter pilots were portrayed as modern knights, and many became popular heroes
[...More...]

Spark Ignition
A spark-ignition engine is an internal combustion engine, generally a petrol engine, where the combustion process of the air-fuel mixture is ignited by a spark from a spark plug. This is in contrast to compression-ignition engines, typically diesel engines, where the heat generated from compression together with the injection of fuel is enough to initiate the combustion process, without needing any external spark.Contents1 Fuels 2 Working cycle 3 See also 4 ReferencesFuels[edit] Spark-ignition engines are commonly referred to as "gasoline engines" in North America, and "petrol engines" in Britain and the rest of the world
[...More...]

picture info

Ignition Magneto
An ignition magneto, or high tension magneto, is a magneto that provides current for the ignition system of a spark-ignition engine, such as a petrol engine. It produces pulses of high voltage for the spark plugs. The older term tension means voltage.[1] The use of ignition magnetos is now confined mainly to engines where there is no other available electrical supply, for example in lawnmowers and chainsaws. It is also widely used in aviation piston engines even though an electrical supply is usually available
[...More...]

picture info

Throttle
A throttle is the mechanism by which fluid flow is managed by the constriction or obstruction. An engine's power can be increased or decreased by the restriction of inlet gases (by the use of a throttle), but usually decreased. The term throttle has come to refer, informally and incorrectly, to any mechanism by which the power or speed of an engine is regulated, such as a car's accelerator pedal. What is often termed a throttle (in an aviation context) is more correctly called a thrust lever, particularly for jet engine powered aircraft
[...More...]

picture info

Reset Button
In electronics and technology, a reset button is a button that can reset a device. On video game consoles, the reset button restarts the game, losing the player's unsaved progress. On personal computers,[NB 1] the reset button clears the memory and reboots the machine forcibly. Reset buttons are found on circuit breakers to reset the circuit. This button can cause data corruption so this button often doesn't exist on many machines. Usually, in computers and other electronic devices, it is present as a small button, possibly recessed into the case or only accessible by a pin or similar thin object, to prevent it being pressed accidentally.Contents1 Personal computers 2 Game consoles 3 See also 4 NotesPersonal computers[edit]The icon denoting the power or reset function on most devicesThe reset button could be an actual button or concept
[...More...]

picture info

Nuclear Reactor
A nuclear reactor, formerly known as an atomic pile, is a device used to initiate and control a self-sustained nuclear chain reaction. Nuclear reactors are used at nuclear power plants for electricity generation and in nuclear marine propulsion. Heat from nuclear fission is passed to a working fluid (water or gas), which in turn runs through steam turbines. These either drive a ship's propellers or turn electrical generators' shafts. Nuclear generated steam in principle can be used for industrial process heat or for district heating. Some reactors are used to produce isotopes for medical and industrial use, or for production of weapons-grade plutonium
[...More...]

picture info

Data Center
A data center is a facility used to house computer systems and associated components, such as telecommunications and storage systems. It generally includes redundant[clarification needed] or backup power supplies, redundant data communications connections, environmental controls (e.g. air conditioning, fire suppression) and various security devices
[...More...]

picture info

European Union
The European Union
European Union
(EU) is a political and economic union of 28 member states that are located primarily in Europe.[12] It has an area of 4,475,757 km2 (1,728,099 sq mi) and an estimated population of about 513 million. The EU has developed an internal single market through a standardised system of laws that apply in all member states in those matters, and only those matters, where members have agreed to act as one
[...More...]

Machinery Directive
The Machinery Directive, Directive 2006/42/EC of the European Parliament and of the Council of 17 May 2006 is a European Union directive concerning machinery and certain parts of machinery.[1] Its main intent is to ensure a common safety level in machinery placed on the market or put in service in all member states and to ensure freedom of movement within the European Union by stating that "member states shall not prohibit, restrict or impede the placing on the market and/or putting into service in their territory of machinery which complies with [the] Directive".Contents1 European economic directives 2 Scope 3 First Publication 4 Second Publication 5 Third Publication 6 ReferencesEuropean economic directives[edit] Economic directives apply to products. They were taken under the new approach in order to facilitate the free movement of goods and products in the European Union by removing barriers to trade in the European market
[...More...]

picture info

Explosive Material
An explosive material, also called an explosive, is a reactive substance that contains a great amount of potential energy that can produce an explosion if released suddenly, usually accompanied by the production of light, heat, sound, and pressure. An explosive charge is a measured quantity of explosive material, which may be composed of a single ingredient or a combination of two or more. The potential energy stored in an explosive material may, for example, bechemical energy, such as nitroglycerin or grain dust pressurized gas, such as a gas cylinder or aerosol can nuclear energy, such as in the fissile isotopes uranium-235 and plutonium-239 Explosive
Explosive
materials may be categorized by the speed at which they expand. Materials that detonate (the front of the chemical reaction moves faster through the material than the speed of sound) are said to be "high explosives" and materials that deflagrate are said to be "low explosives"
[...More...]

picture info

Rotary Engine
The rotary engine was an early type of internal combustion engine, usually designed with an odd number of cylinders per row in a radial configuration, in which the crankshaft remained stationary in operation, with the entire crankcase and its attached cylinders rotating around it as a unit. Its main application was in aviation, although it also saw use before its primary aviation role, in a few early motorcycles and automobiles. This type of engine was widely used as an alternative to conventional inline engines (straight or V) during World War I
World War I
and the years immediately preceding that conflict
[...More...]

picture info

Flammability
Flammable materials are those that ignite more easily than other materials, whereas those that are harder to ignite or burn less vigorously are combustible. The degree of flammability or combustibility in air depends largely upon the chemical composition of the subject material, as well as the ratio of mass versus surface area. Take wood as an example. Finely divided wood dust can undergo explosive combustion and produce a blast wave. A piece of paper (made from wood) catches on fire quite easily. A heavy oak desk is much harder to ignite, even though the wood fibre is the same in all three materials. Common sense (and indeed scientific consensus until the mid-1700s) would seem to suggest that material "disappears" when burned, as only the ash is left. In fact, there is an increase in weight because the combustible material reacts (or combines) chemically with oxygen, which also has mass
[...More...]

.