HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

picture info

Bieszczady Mountains
Bieszczady [bʲɛˈʂt͡ʂadɨ] is a mountain range that runs from the extreme south-east of Poland
Poland
through Ukraine
Ukraine
and Slovakia. It forms the western part of the Eastern Beskids
Eastern Beskids
(Beskidy Wschodnie), and is more generally part of the Outer Eastern Carpathians. The mountain range is situated between the Łupków Pass
Łupków Pass
(640 m) and the Vyshkovskyi Pass (933 m). Frequently Bieszczady refers only to the Western Bieszczady or even only to the part of the range lying within Poland. The highest peak of Bieszczady is Mt. Pikuy (1405 m) in Ukraine. The highest peak of the Polish part is Tarnica
Tarnica
(1346 m).Contents1 Term 2 Division 3 History 4 Hiking trails 5 Hillclimb 6 Literature 7 Notes 8 Bibliography 9 External linksTerm[edit] The term Bieszczady in the wide sense is used only in Poland
[...More...]

"Bieszczady Mountains" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Operation Vistula
Operation Vistula
Operation Vistula
(Polish: Akcja "Wisła") was a codename for the 1947 forced resettlement of Ukrainian minority including Boykos
Boykos
and Lemkos from the south-eastern provinces of post-war Poland, to the Recovered Territories in the west of the country. The action was carried out by the Soviet-installed Polish communist authorities with the aim of removing material support and assistance to the Ukrainian Insurgent Army.[2][3] The Ukrainian Insurgent Army
Ukrainian Insurgent Army
continued its guerilla activities until 1947 in both Subcarpathian and Lublin Voivodeships with no hope for any peaceful resolution
[...More...]

"Operation Vistula" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Great Moravia
Great Moravia
Moravia
(Latin: Regnum Marahensium; Greek: Μεγάλη Μοραβία, Megale Moravia; Czech: Velká Morava; Slovak: Veľká Morava; Polish: Wielka Morawa), the Great Moravian Empire,[1] or simply Moravia,[2][3][4] was the first major state that was predominantly West Slavic to emerge in the area of Central Europe,[5] chiefly on what is now the territory of the Czech Republic, Slovakia, Poland
Poland
(including Silesia), and Hungary. The only formation preceding it in these territories was Samo's Empire known from between 631 and 658 AD
[...More...]

"Great Moravia" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Skole Beskids
The Skole Beskids
Skole Beskids
(in Ukrainian, Сколівські Бескиди) is a mountain range in western Ukraine, within the set of ranges called Eastern Beskids and the Ukrainian Carpathians
Eastern Beskids and the Ukrainian Carpathians
of the Outer Eastern Carpathians. The mountains are composed primary of Carpathian flysch. The northern section of the range is the location of the Skole Beskids
Skole Beskids
National Park,[1] established in 1999; within the park is the highest peak in the range, Mount Parashka, at 1268 meters. Zwinin
Zwinin
Mountain, at 992 meters above sea level, is also located within the park. The Skole Beskids
Skole Beskids
is also the site of the sandstone fortresses of Tustan', built between the 9th century and 13th century, now a State Historical and Cultural Reserve. It's near the town of Boryslav. Gallery[edit]Skole Beskids
[...More...]

"Skole Beskids" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Celts
Pontic SteppeDomestication of the horse Kurgan Kurgan
Kurgan
culture Steppe culturesBug-Dniester Sredny Stog Dnieper-Donets Samara Khvalynsk YamnaMikhaylovka cultureCaucasusMaykopEast-AsiaAfanasevoEastern EuropeUsatovo Cernavodă CucuteniNorthern EuropeCorded wareBaden Middle Dnieper Bronze
[...More...]

"Celts" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Goths
The Goths
Goths
were an East Germanic people, two of whose branches, the Visigoths
Visigoths
and the Ostrogoths, played an important role in the fall of the Western Roman Empire
Roman Empire
and the emergence of Medieval Europe. The Goths
Goths
dominated a vast area,[1] which at its peak under the Germanic king Ermanaric and his sub-king Athanaric possibly extended all the way from the Danube
Danube
to the Don, and from the Black Sea
Black Sea
to the Baltic Sea.[2] The Goths
Goths
spoke the Gothic language, one of the extinct East Germanic languages
[...More...]

"Goths" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Vandals
The Vandals, a large East Germanic tribe or group of tribes, first appear in history inhabiting present-day southern Poland, but some later moved in large numbers, including most notably the group which successively established kingdoms in Spain and then North Africa
North Africa
in the 5th century.[1] Scholars believe that the Vandals
Vandals
migrated from southern Scandinavia to the area between the lower Oder
Oder
and Vistula
Vistula
rivers during the 2nd century BC and settled in Silesia
Silesia
from around 120 BC.[2][3][4] They are associated with the Przeworsk culture
Przeworsk culture
and were possibly the same people as the Lugii
[...More...]

"Vandals" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Przeworsk Culture
The Przeworsk[1] culture is part of an Iron Age
Iron Age
archaeological complex that dates from the 3rd century BC to the 5th century AD.[2] It was located in what is now central and southern Poland - the upper Oder
Oder
to the Vistula
Vistula
basin, later spreading to parts of eastern Slovakia and Subcarpathia
Subcarpathia
ranging between the Oder
Oder
and the middle and upper Vistula
Vistula
Rivers and extending south towards the middle Danube into the headwaters of the Dniester
Dniester
and Tisza
Tisza
Rivers
[...More...]

"Przeworsk Culture" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

Puchov Culture
The Púchov
Púchov
culture was an archaeological culture named after site of Púchov-Skalka in Slovakia. Its probable bearer was the Celtic Cotini and/or Anartes
Anartes
tribes. It existed in northern and central Slovakia (although it also plausibly spread to the surrounding regions) between the 2nd century BCE and the 1st century CE. The Púchov
Púchov
culture developed from the Lusatian culture
Lusatian culture
and it was influenced later by the Illyrian culture, the Celts, and by the beginning of the Christian era, the Dacians. Settlements were situated on moderate hill sides and near streams. The largest known religious, economic, and political center of the Púchov
Púchov
culture was the hill-fort of Havránok, famous for its traces of human sacrifice
[...More...]

"Puchov Culture" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

San River
The San (Polish: San; Ukrainian: Сян Sian; German: Saan) is a river in southeastern Poland
Poland
and western Ukraine, a tributary of the Vistula River, with a length of 443 km (it is the 6th-longest Polish river) and a basin area of 16,861 km2 (14,390 km2 of it in Poland).Contents1 Etymology 2 Course 3 Tributaries 4 History of the region 5 Cities 6 See also 7 References 8 LiteratureEtymology[edit] San in proto-
[...More...]

"San River" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

Hungarian People
Hungarians, also known as Magyars (Hungarian: magyarok), are a nation and ethnic group native to Hungary (Hungarian: Magyarország) and historical Hungarian lands who share a common culture, history and speak the Hungarian language. There are an estimated 13.1–14.7 million ethnic Hungarians and their descendants worldwide, of whom 8.5–9.8 million live in today's Hungary (as of 2011).[25] About 2.2 million Hungarians live in areas that were part of the Kingdom of Hungary before the 1918–1920 dissolution of the Austro-Hungarian Monarchy and the Treaty of Trianon, and are now parts of Hungary's seven neighbouring countries, especially Romania, Austria, Slovakia, Serbia and Ukraine. Significant groups of people with Hungarian ancestry live in various other parts of the world, most of them in the United States, Canada, Germany, France, the United Kingdom, Brazil, Australia, and Argentina
[...More...]

"Hungarian People" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

West Slavs
The West Slavs
Slavs
are a subgroup of Slavic peoples
Slavic peoples
who speak the West Slavic languages. They separated from the common Slavic group around the 7th century, and established independent polities in Central Europe by the 8th to 9th centuries. The West Slavic languages diversified into their historically attested forms over the 10th to 14th centuries. West Slavic speaking nations today include the Czechs, Kashubians, Poles, Silesians, Slovaks
Slovaks
and Sorbs
[...More...]

"West Slavs" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

Magyars
Hungarians, also known as Magyars (Hungarian: magyarok), are a nation and ethnic group native to Hungary (Hungarian: Magyarország) and historical Hungarian lands who share a common culture, history and speak the Hungarian language. There are an estimated 13.1–14.7 million ethnic Hungarians and their descendants worldwide, of whom 8.5–9.8 million live in today's Hungary (as of 2011).[25] About 2.2 million Hungarians live in areas that were part of the Kingdom of Hungary before the 1918–1920 dissolution of the Austro-Hungarian Monarchy and the Treaty of Trianon, and are now parts of Hungary's seven neighbouring countries, especially Romania, Austria, Slovakia, Serbia and Ukraine. Significant groups of people with Hungarian ancestry live in various other parts of the world, most of them in the United States, Canada, Germany, France, the United Kingdom, Brazil, Australia, and Argentina
[...More...]

"Magyars" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Water Divide
A drainage divide, water divide, divide, ridgeline,[1] watershed, or water parting is the line that separates neighbouring drainage basins. On rugged land, the divide lies along topographical ridges, and may be in the form of a single range of hills or mountains, known as a dividing range
[...More...]

"Water Divide" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Lendians
The Lendians
Lendians
(Polish: Lędzianie) were a West Slavic tribe who lived in the area of East Lesser Poland
Lesser Poland
and
[...More...]

"Lendians" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Kievan Rus
Kievan Rus'
Kievan Rus'
(Old East Slavic: Рѹ́сь (Rus'), Рѹ́сьскаѧ землѧ (Rus'skaya zemlya), Latin: Rus(s)ia, Ruscia, Ruzzia, Rut(h)enia,[2][3]) was a loose federation[4] of East Slavic tribes in Europe
Europe
from the late 9th to the mid-13th century,[5] under the reign of the Rurik
Rurik
dynasty
[...More...]

"Kievan Rus" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse
.