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Bible Translations
The Bible
Bible
has been translated into many languages from the biblical languages of Hebrew, Aramaic
Aramaic
and Greek. As of October 2017[update] the full Bible
Bible
has been translated into 670 languages, the New Testament
New Testament
alone into 1521 languages and Bible portions or stories into 1121 other languages. Thus at least some portion of the Bible
Bible
has been translated into 3,312 languages.[1] The Latin
Latin
Vulgate
Vulgate
was dominant in Western Christianity
Western Christianity
through the Middle Ages. Since then, the Bible
Bible
has been translated into many more languages
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Masoretes
The Masoretes (Hebrew: בעלי המסורה‬ Ba'alei ha-Masora) were groups of Jewish
Jewish
scribe-scholars who worked between the 6th and 10th centuries CE,[1] based primarily in early medieval Palestine in the cities of Tiberias
Tiberias
and Jerusalem, as well as in Iraq (Babylonia). Each group compiled a system of pronunciation and grammatical guides in the form of diacritical notes on the external form of the biblical text in an attempt to standardize the pronunciation, paragraph and verse divisions and cantillation of the Jewish
Jewish
Bible, the Tanakh, for the worldwide Jewish
Jewish
community. The ben Asher family of Masoretes was largely responsible for the preservation and production of the Masoretic Text, although an alternate Masoretic text of the ben Naphtali Masoretes, which has around 875 differences from the ben Asher text,[2] existed
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Biblical Aramaic
Biblical Aramaic
Aramaic
is the form of Aramaic
Aramaic
that is used in the books of Daniel, Ezra and a few other places in the Hebrew Bible
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Fandub
A fandub is a fan-made dub or redub of a live-action or animated production. Dubbing is the act of re-recording of a live-action or animated production, typically in a language other than the original. Most productions are translated from different languages, but fandubs do exist for productions that were produced in the fandubber's native language. The dialogue can range from being a close translation to a completely altered version of the original script's story and plots, as well as the personalities of protagonists. The reasons behind fandubbing can range from the production not receiving an official dub to the official dub being poorly received. Fandubs are most commonly done with Japanese animation, but can include live action and animated series and movies in any language
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Biblical Hebrew
Biblical Hebrew
Biblical Hebrew
(עִבְרִית מִקְרָאִית‎ Ivrit Miqra'it or לְשׁוֹן הַמִּקְרָא‎ Leshon ha-Miqra), also called Classical Hebrew, is an archaic form of Hebrew, a Canaanite Semitic language spoken by the Israelites
Israelites
in the area known as Israel, roughly west of the Jordan River
Jordan River
and east of the Mediterranean Sea. The term "Hebrew" was not used for the language in the Bible,[3] which was referred to as שפת כנען (language of Canaan) or יהודית (Judaean, Judahite),[3] but the name was used in Greek and Mishnaic Hebrew
Mishnaic Hebrew
texts.[3] Hebrew is attested epigraphically from about the 10th century BCE,[4][5] and spoken Hebrew persisted through and beyond the Second Temple
Second Temple
period, which ended in the siege of Jerusalem
Jerusalem
(CE 70)
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Glocalization
Glocalization
Glocalization
(a portmanteau of globalization and localization) is the "simultaneous occurrence of both universalizing and particularizing tendencies in contemporary social, political, and economic systems."[1] The notion of glocalization "represents a challenge to simplistic conceptions of globalization processes as linear expansions of territorial scales
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Western Christianity
Western Christianity
Christianity
is the type of Christianity
Christianity
which developed in the areas of the former Western Roman Empire.[1] Western Christianity consists of the Latin Rite
Latin Rite
of the Catholic Church
Catholic Church
(in contrast to the Eastern rites in communion with Rome) and a wide variety of Protestant denominations. The name "Western Christianity" is applied in order to distinguish these from Eastern Christianity. With the expansion of European colonialism from the Early Modern era, Western Christianity
Christianity
spread throughout the Americas, much of the Philippines, Southern Africa, pockets of West Africa, and throughout Australia
Australia
and New Zealand
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Quran Translations
Translations of the Qur'an are interpretations of the scripture of Islam
Islam
in languages other than Arabic. Qur'an was originally written in the Arabic language
Arabic language
and has been translated into most major African, Asian and European languages.[1]Contents1 Islamic theology 2 History2.1 European languages2.1.1 Latin 2.1.2 Modern languages 2.1.3 French Language 2.1.4 Spanish 2.1.5 English2.2 Asian languages2.2.1 Urdu 2.2.2 Bengali 2.2.3 Hindi
Hindi
and Gujarati 2.2.4 Tamil 2.2.5 Turkish 2.2.6 Japanese 2.2.7 Chinese 2.2.8 Indonesian languages 2.2.9 Nuclear Malayo-Polynesian languages2.3 African languages 2.4 Esperanto3 See also 4 References 5 Further reading 6 External linksIslamic theology[edit] Further information: Islamic theology Translation of the Qur'an has always been a problematic and difficult issue in Islamic theology
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Book Of Daniel
The Book
Book
of Daniel is a biblical apocalypse, combining a prophecy of history with an eschatology (the study of last things) which is both cosmic in scope and political in its focus.[1] In more mundane language, it is "an account of the activities and visions of Daniel, a noble Jew exiled at Babylon,"[2] its message being that just as the God of Israel saved Daniel and his friends from their enemies, so he would save all of Israel in their present oppression.[3] In the Hebrew Bible
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Book Of Ezra
The Book
Book
of Ezra
Ezra
is a book of the Hebrew Bible; which formerly included the Book of Nehemiah
Book of Nehemiah
in a single book, commonly distinguished in scholarship as Ezra–Nehemiah
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Koine Greek
Koine Greek
Koine Greek
(UK English /ˈkɔɪniː/,[1] US English /kɔɪˈneɪ/, /ˈkɔɪneɪ/ or /kiːˈniː/;[2][3]), also known as Alexandrian dialect, common Attic, Hellenistic or Biblical Greek, was the common supra-regional form of Greek spoken and written during Hellenistic and Roman antiquity and the early Byzantine era, or Late Antiquity. It evolved from the spread of Greek following the conquests of Alexander the Great in the 4th century BC, and served as the lingua franca of much of the Mediterranean region and the Middle East during the following centuries
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Transcription (linguistics)
Transcription in the linguistic sense is the systematic representation of language in written form. The source can either be utterances (speech or sign language) or preexisting text in another writing system. Transcription should not be confused with translation, which means representing the meaning of a source language text in a target language (e.g. translating the meaning of an English text into Spanish), or with transliteration which means representing a text from one script in another (e.g. transliterating a Cyrillic text into the Latin script). In the academic discipline of linguistics, transcription is an essential part of the methodologies of (among others) phonetics, conversation analysis, dialectology and sociolinguistics
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Internationalization And Localization
In computing, internationalization and localization are means of adapting computer software to different languages, regional differences and technical requirements of a target locale.[1] Internationalization
Internationalization
is the process of designing a software application so that it can be adapted to various languages and regions without engineering changes. Localization is the process of adapting internationalized software for a specific region or language by adding locale-specific components and translating text
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Language Localisation
Language localisation
Language localisation
(or localization, see spelling differences) is the process of adapting a product that has been previously translated into multiple languages to a specific country or region (from Latin locus (place) and the English term locale, "a place where something happens or is set").[1] It is the second phase of a larger process of product translation and cultural adaptation (for specific countries, regions or groups) to account for differences in distinct markets, a process known as internationalisation and localisation. Language localisation
Language localisation
differs from translation activity because it involves a comprehensive study of the target culture in order to correctly adapt the product to local needs
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Game Localization
Video game
Video game
localization is the preparation of video game software and hardware for sale in a new region or country. Although translating the text is a large part of localization, the process includes any changes made to a game, including altering art assets, creating new packaging and manuals, recording new audio, transforming hardware, cutting out whole portions of the game due to differing cultural sensitivities, and even adding sections to replace cut content. The decision to localize a game relies heavily on economic factors, such as the potential profits that could be made in a new country.[1] As such, the process is usually undertaken either by the game developers themselves or by a third-party translating company, though unauthorized fan localizations can occur if a translation is poor quality or if a game is not going to be released in a specific language
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Dub Localization
Dub localization, also often simply referred to as localization, is a form of a voice-over. It is the practice of voice-over translation altering a foreign language film, art film or television series by voice actors. Dub localization
Dub localization
is a hot button issue active in cinephilia amongst aficionados of foreign filmmaking and television programs, particularly anime fans as dubs are still a popular form of translation of animated series. While some localization is virtually inevitable in translation, the controversy surrounding how much localization is "too much" is often much-discussed in such communities, especially when the final dub product is significantly different from the original
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