HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

picture info

Bernardino De Sahagún
Bernardino de Sahagún
Sahagún
(Spanish: [bernarˈðino ðe saaˈɣun]; c. 1499 – October 23, 1590) was a Franciscan
Franciscan
friar, missionary priest and pioneering ethnographer who participated in the Catholic evangelization of colonial New Spain
New Spain
(now Mexico). Born in Sahagún, Spain, in 1499, he journeyed to New Spain
New Spain
in 1529. He learned Nahuatl and spent more than 50 years in the study of Aztec
Aztec
beliefs, culture and history. Though he was primarily devoted to his missionary task, his extraordinary work documenting indigenous worldview and culture has earned him the title as “the first anthropologist."[1][2] He also contributed to the description of the Aztec
Aztec
language Nahuatl
[...More...]

"Bernardino De Sahagún" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Encyclopedias
An encyclopedia or encyclopaedia is a reference work or compendium providing summaries of information from either all branches of knowledge or from a particular field or discipline.[1] Encyclopedias are divided into articles or entries that are often arranged alphabetically by article name[2] and sometimes by thematic categories
[...More...]

"Encyclopedias" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Indocristiano
Indochristian art, or arte indocristiano, is a type of Latin American art that combines European colonial influences with Indigenous artistic styles and traditions. During the Spanish colonization of the Americas, Franciscan, Dominican, and Augustinian monks extensively converted indigenous peoples to Christianity, introducing them to European arts and aesthetics
[...More...]

"Indocristiano" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Kingdom Of Spain
Coordinates: 40°N 4°W / 40°N 4°W / 40; -4Kingdom of Spain Reino de España  (Spanish)6 other official names[a][b]Aragonese: Reino d'EspanyaAsturian: Reinu d'EspañaBasque: Espainiako ErresumaCatalan: Regne d'EspanyaGalician: Reino de EspañaOccitan: Reiaume d'EspanhaFlagCoat of armsMotto: "Plus Ultra" (Latin) "Further Beyond"Anthem: "Marcha Real" (Spanish)[2] "Royal March"Location of  Spain  (dark green) – in Europe  (green & dark grey) – in the European Union  (green)Capital and largest city Madrid 40°26′N 3°42′W / 40.433°N 3.700°W / 40.433; -3.700Official language and national language Spanish[c]Co-official languages in certain autonomous communities Catalan Galician Basque OccitanEthnic groups (2015)89.9% Spanish 10.1% othersReligi
[...More...]

"Kingdom Of Spain" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Conquistadores
Conquistadors /kɒŋˈkɪstəˌdɔːrz/ (from Portuguese or Spanish conquistadores "conquerors"; Spanish pronunciation: [koŋkistaˈðoɾes], Portuguese pronunciation: [kũkiʃtɐˈdoɾis], [kõkiʃtɐˈðoɾɨʃ]) is a term used to refer to the soldiers and explorers of the Spanish Empire or the Portuguese Empire
Portuguese Empire
in a general sense.[1][2] During the Age of Discovery, conquistadors sailed beyond Europe to the Americas, Oceania, Africa and Asia, conquering territory and opening trade routes
[...More...]

"Conquistadores" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Fall Of Tenochtitlan
Decisive Spanish and Tlaxcallan victoryFall of the Aztec EmpireBelligerents Spanish Empire Confederacy of Tlaxcala Texcoco Otomis Xochimilco Mixquic Iztapalapa Triple Alliance Tenochtitlan TlatelolcoCommanders and leaders Hernán Cortés Gonzalo de Sandoval Pedro de Alvarado Cristóbal de Olid Xicotencatl I Xicotencatl II  Cuauhtémoc (POW)Strength16 guns[1] 13 brigantines 80,000–200,000 native allies 90–100 cavalry 900–1,300 infantry[1] 80,000–300,000 warriors[2](including war acallis)Casualties and losses450–860 Spanish[1] 20,000 Tlaxcallan 100,000 warriors 100,000–200,000 civiliansAztec civilizationAztec societyNahuatl languageReligion · Mythology ·Calendar · MedicineHuman sacrificeTenochtitlan  · Templo MayorAztec history · Aztlán · WarfareCodices · Az
[...More...]

"Fall Of Tenochtitlan" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Mexico City
Mexico
Mexico
City, or the City of Mexico
Mexico
(Spanish: Ciudad de México, American Spanish: [sjuˈða(ð) ðe ˈmexiko] ( listen);[13] abbreviated as CDMX), is the capital of Mexico
Mexico
and the most populous city in North America.[14] Mexico
Mexico
City is one of the most important cultural and financial centers in the Americas.[15] It is located in the Valley of Mexico (Valle de México), a large valley in the high plateaus in the center of Mexico, at an altitude of 2,240 metres (7,350 ft)
[...More...]

"Mexico City" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Age Of Discovery
The Age of Discovery, or the Age of Exploration
Exploration
(approximately from the beginning of the 15th century
15th century
until the end of the 18th century) is an informal and loosely defined term for the period in European history in which extensive overseas exploration emerged as a powerful factor in European culture and was the beginning of globalization. It also marks the rise of the period of widespread adoption in Europe
Europe
of colonialism and mercantilism as national policies. Many lands previously unknown to Europeans were discovered by them during this period, though most were already inhabited
[...More...]

"Age Of Discovery" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Patronato Real
The Patronato (literally: "Patronage") system in Spain (and a similar padroado system in Portugal) was the expression of royal patronage controlling major appointments of Church officials and the management of Church revenues, under terms of concordats with the Holy See. The resulting structure of royal power and ecclesiastical privileges, was formative in the Spanish colonial empire
[...More...]

"Patronato Real" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Pope
The pope (Latin: papa from Greek: πάππας pappas,[1] a child's word for "father"),[2] also known as the supreme pontiff (from Latin pontifex maximus "greatest bridge-builder"), is the Bishop
Bishop
of Rome, and therefore ex officio the leader of the worldwide Catholic Church.[3] The primacy of the Roman bishop is largely derived from his role as the supposed apostolic successor to Saint Peter, to whom Jesus is said to have given the Keys of Heaven
Keys of Heaven
and the powers of "binding and loosing", naming him as the "rock" upon which the church would be built. The pope is also head of state of Vatican City,[4] a sovereign city-state entirely enclaved within Rome. The current pope is Francis, who was elected on 13 March 2013, succeeding Benedict XVI.[5] The office of the pope is the papacy
[...More...]

"Pope" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Millenarianism
Millenarianism (also millenarism), from Latin mīllēnārius "containing a thousand", is the belief by a religious, social, or political group or movement in a coming major transformation of society, after which all things will be changed.[citation needed] Millenarianism exists in many cultures and religions.[1]Contents1 Terminology 2 Theology 3 Movements 4 See also 5 References 6 Further reading 7 External linksTerminology[edit] The terms "millenarianism" and "millennialism" are sometimes used interchangeably, but this usage is incorrect. As Stephen Jay Gould notes: Millennium is from the Latin mille, "one thousand," and annus, "year"—hence the two n's
[...More...]

"Millenarianism" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Indochristian Art
Indochristian art, or arte indocristiano, is a type of Latin American art that combines European colonial influences with Indigenous artistic styles and traditions. During the Spanish colonization of the Americas, Franciscan, Dominican, and Augustinian monks extensively converted indigenous peoples to Christianity, introducing them to European arts and aesthetics
[...More...]

"Indochristian Art" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Humanism
Humanism
Humanism
is a philosophical and ethical stance that emphasizes the value and agency of human beings, individually and collectively, and generally prefers critical thinking and evidence (rationalism and empiricism) over acceptance of dogma or superstition. The meaning of the term humanism has fluctuated according to the successive intellectual movements which have identified with it.[1] The term was coined by theologian Friedrich Niethammer at the beginning of the 19th century to refer to a system of education based on the study of classical literature ("classical humanism")
[...More...]

"Humanism" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Utopian
A utopia (/juːˈtoʊpiə/ yoo-TOH-pee-ə) is an imagined community or society that possesses highly desirable or nearly perfect qualities for its citizens.[1][2] The opposite of a utopia is a dystopia
[...More...]

"Utopian" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Juan Badiano
Juan Badiano (1484-after 1552) was the translator of Libellus de Medicinalibus Indorum Herbis ca. 1552, from Nahuatl to Latin. The book was a compendium of 250 medicinal herbs used by the Aztecs. This compilation was originally done by Martin de la Cruz (another Indian who was baptised with this Christian name). This catalogue is a historic document, since it shows the Aztec's advancements in medicine. Badiano was born in Xochimilco, Mexico, and taught Latin in the school of Tlatelolco, where he attended with Martin de la Cruz and proved to be an outstanding student. References[edit]This section is empty. You can help by adding to it. (June 2015)External links[edit]Don Juan Badiano y don Martin de la Cruz Spanish article on Cruz-Badiano Codex Spanish article on Juan BadianoAuthority controlWorldCat Identities VIAF: 103417494 SUDOC: 113293771This article related to indigenous Mesoamerican culture is a stub
[...More...]

"Juan Badiano" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Catechism
A catechism ( /ˈkætəˌkizəm/; from Greek: κατηχέω, "to teach orally") is a summary or exposition of doctrine and serves as a learning introduction to the Sacraments
Sacraments
traditionally used in catechesis, or Christian
Christian
religious teaching of children and adult converts.[1] Catechisms are doctrinal manuals – often in the form of questions followed by answers to be memorised – a format that has been used in non-religious or secular contexts as well. The term catechumen refers to the designated recipient of the catechetical work or instruction. In the Catholic Church, catechumens are those who are preparing to receive the Sacrament
Sacrament
of Baptism
[...More...]

"Catechism" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
.