HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1500] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

picture info

Beningbrough Hall
BENINGBROUGH HALL is a large Georgian mansion near the village of Beningbrough , North Yorkshire , England, and overlooks the River Ouse . It has baroque interiors, cantilevered stairs, wood carving and central corridors which run the length of the house. Externally the house is a red-brick Georgian mansion with a grand drive running to the main frontage and a walled garden, The house is home to more than 100 portraits on loan from the National Portrait Gallery . It has a restaurant, shop and garden shop, and was shortlisted in 2010 for the Guardian Family Friendly Museum Award. The Hall is set in extensive grounds and is separated from them by an example of a ha-ha (a sunken wall) to prevent sheep and cattle entering the Hall's gardens or the Hall itself. CONTENTS * 1 History * 2 See also * 3 References * 4 External links HISTORY Beningbrough Hall, situated 6.2 miles (10 km) north west of York , was built in 1716 by a York landowner, John Bourchier III to replace his family's modest Elizabethan manor, which had been built in 1556 by Sir Ralph Bourchier on his inheritance to the estate. Local builder William Thornton oversaw the construction, but Beningbrough's designer remains a mystery; possibly it was Thomas Archer . Bourchier was High Sheriff of Yorkshire for 1719-1721 and died in 1736 at the age of 52
[...More...]

"Beningbrough Hall" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

English Country House
An ENGLISH COUNTRY HOUSE is a large house or mansion in the English countryside. Such houses were often owned by individuals who also owned a town house . This allowed them to spend time in the country and in the city—hence, for these people, the term distinguished between town and country. However, the term also encompasses houses that were, and often still are, the full-time residence for the landed gentry that ruled rural Britain until the Reform Act 1832 . Frequently, the formal business of the counties was transacted in these country houses. With large numbers of indoor and outdoor staff, country houses were important as places of employment for many rural communities. In turn, until the agricultural depressions of the 1870s , the estates, of which country houses were the hub, provided their owners with incomes. However, the late 19th and early 20th centuries were the swansong of the traditional English country house lifestyle. Increased taxation and the effects of World War I led to the demolition of hundreds of houses ; those that remained had to adapt to survive. While a château or a schloss can be a fortified or unfortified building, a country house is usually unfortified. If fortified, it is called a castle, but not all buildings with the name 'castle' are fortified (for example Highclere Castle )
[...More...]

"English Country House" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Georgian Architecture
GEORGIAN ARCHITECTURE is the name given in most English-speaking countries to the set of architectural styles current between 1714 and 1830. It is eponymous for the first four British monarchs of the House of Hanover —George I , George II , George III , and George IV —who reigned in continuous succession from August 1714 to June 1830. The style was revived in the late 19th century in the United States as Colonial Revival architecture
Colonial Revival architecture
and in the early 20th century in Great Britain as NEO-GEORGIAN ARCHITECTURE; in both it is also called GEORGIAN REVIVAL ARCHITECTURE. In the United States the term "Georgian" is generally used to describe all buildings from the period, regardless of style; in Britain it is generally restricted to buildings that are "architectural in intention", and have stylistic characteristics that are typical of the period, though that covers a wide range. The style of Georgian buildings is very variable, but marked by a taste for symmetry and proportion based on the classical architecture of Greece and Rome
Rome
, as revived in Renaissance architecture
Renaissance architecture

[...More...]

"Georgian Architecture" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Beningbrough
BENINGBROUGH is a village and civil parish in the Hambleton
Hambleton
district of North Yorkshire
North Yorkshire
, England. The population as taken at the 2011 Census was less than 100. Details are included in the civil parish of Shipton, North Yorkshire
North Yorkshire
. Beningbrough
Beningbrough
village is 6 miles (10 km) north-west from York
York
city centre. The parish, which includes Beningbrough Hall and Park, is bordered at the south-west by the River Ouse , beyond which is the district of Harrogate
Harrogate
. According to the 2001 Census, parish population was 55. Beningbrough
Beningbrough
is within the ecclesiastical parish of Shipton with Overton. The parish church of Holy Evangelists is at Shipton by Beningbrough
Beningbrough
. Beningbrough
Beningbrough
is listed in the 1086 Domesday Book
Domesday Book
as "Benniburg", meaning a "stronghold associated with a man called 'Beonna'", being an Old English
Old English
person name. At the time of the Norman Conquest , Beningbrough
Beningbrough
was in the Bulford Hundred of the North Riding of Yorkshire . The settlement contained five households and five villagers , with one-and-a-half ploughlands , three furlongs of woodland, and six acres of meadow
[...More...]

"Beningbrough" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

North Yorkshire
NORTH YORKSHIRE is a non-metropolitan county (or shire county) and larger ceremonial county in England
England
. It is located primarily in the region of Yorkshire and the Humber
Yorkshire and the Humber
but partly in the region of North East England
England
. Created by the Local Government Act 1972 , it covers an area of 8,654 square kilometres (3,341 sq mi), making it the largest county in England
England
. The majority of the Yorkshire Dales and the North York Moors lie within North Yorkshire's boundaries, and around 40% of the county is covered by National Parks
[...More...]

"North Yorkshire" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Geographic Coordinate System
A GEOGRAPHIC COORDINATE SYSTEM is a coordinate system used in geography that enables every location on Earth to be specified by a set of numbers, letters or symbols. The coordinates are often chosen such that one of the numbers represents a vertical position , and two or three of the numbers represent a horizontal position . A common choice of coordinates is latitude , longitude and elevation . To specify a location on a two-dimensional map requires a map projection
[...More...]

"Geographic Coordinate System" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

National Trust For Places Of Historic Interest Or Natural Beauty
The NATIONAL TRUST FOR PLACES OF HISTORIC INTEREST OR NATURAL BEAUTY, known as the NATIONAL TRUST, is a conservation organisation in England , Wales and Northern Ireland , and the largest membership organisation in the United Kingdom . The trust describes itself as "a charity that works to preserve and protect historic places and spaces—for ever, for everyone." The trust was founded in 1895 and given statutory powers, starting with the National Trust Act 1907. Historically, the trust tended to focus on English country houses , which still make up the largest part of its holdings, but it also protects historic landscapes such as in the Lake District , historic urban properties, and nature reserves. In Scotland, there is an independent National Trust for Scotland . The Trust has special powers to prevent land being sold off or mortgaged, although this can be over-ridden by Parliament. The National Trust has been the beneficiary of many large donations and bequests. It owns over 350 heritage properties, which includes many historic houses and gardens, industrial monuments, and social history sites. Most of these are open to the public, usually for a charge. Others are leased, on terms that manage to preserve their character
[...More...]

"National Trust For Places Of Historic Interest Or Natural Beauty" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Thomas Archer
St. Paul\'s, Deptford St John\'s, Smith Square St Philip\'s Cathedral North Front the other, his epitaph, survives in the parish church of Hale, Hampshire. If these records are accurate, he must have been born between 12 June 1668 and 22 May 1669. Thomas is the only one of the Archer children not to have his birth recorded in the Tamworth-in-Arden parish register, which suggests he may have been born elsewhere. He attended Trinity College, Oxford , from which he matriculated on 12 June 1686. After leaving university, he went on a Grand Tour , spending four years abroad and was influenced by the work of Bernini
Bernini
and Borromini . At the commencement of the civil wars , he was a colonel in the parliamentary forces and raised a troop of horse at his own expense. But when he discovered the designs of the parliamentarians , he threw up his commission and emigrating, remained abroad until the restoration of the monarchy. Thereafter he represented the city of Warwick in the Cavalier Parliament . CHURCHESAmong Archer's churches was St John Evangelist, Westminster suggestive of Hawksmoor's baroque influence. Its four towers were originally built to stabilise subsidence. Historians believed that was more likely than following Sir John Vanbrgh's style
[...More...]

"Thomas Archer" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

River Ouse, Yorkshire
The RIVER OUSE (/ˈuːz/ OOZ ) is a river in North Yorkshire
Yorkshire
, England. Hydrologically the river is a continuation of the River Ure , and the combined length of the River Ure and River Ouse makes it, at 129 miles (208 km), the sixth longest river of the United Kingdom and (including the Ure) the longest to flow entirely in one county. The length of the Ouse alone is about 52 miles (84 km). The river is formed at the confluence of the River Ure and the much smaller Ouse Gill Beck at Cuddy Shaw Reach near Linton-on-Ouse , about six miles downstream of the confluence of the River Swale with the River Ure. It then flows through the city of York
York
and the towns of Selby
Selby
and Goole before joining with the River Trent at Trent Falls
Trent Falls
, near the village of Faxfleet , to form the Humber
Humber
Estuary . The Ouse's system of tributaries (which includes the Derwent , Aire , Don , Wharfe , Rother , Nidd , Swale , Ure , and Foss ) drains a large upland area of northern England, including much of the Yorkshire
Yorkshire
Dales and North York
York
Moors . The Ouse valley is a wide, flat plain; heavy rainfall in the river's catchment area can bring severe flooding to nearby settlements
[...More...]

"River Ouse, Yorkshire" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Baroque
The BAROQUE (US : /bəˈroʊk/ or UK : /bəˈrɒk/ ) is a period of artistic style that used exaggerated motion and clear, easily interpreted detail to produce drama, tension, exuberance, and grandeur in sculpture, painting, architecture, literature, dance, theatre, and music. The style began around 1600 in Rome
Rome
and Italy
Italy
, and spread to most of Europe. The popularity and success of the Baroque
Baroque
style was encouraged by the Catholic Church
Catholic Church
, which had decided at the time of the Council of Trent , in response to the Protestant Reformation , that the arts should communicate religious themes with direct and emotional involvement. The aristocracy viewed the dramatic style of Baroque art and architecture as a means of impressing visitors by projecting triumph, power, and control. Baroque
Baroque
palaces are built around an entrance of courts, grand staircases, and reception rooms of sequentially increasing opulence. However, "baroque" has a resonance and application that extend beyond a simple reduction to either a style or period
[...More...]

"Baroque" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Cantilever
A CANTILEVER is a rigid structural element , such as a beam or a plate, anchored at only one end to a (usually vertical) support from which it is protruding; this could also be a perpendicular connection to a flat vertical surface such as a wall. Cantilevers can also be constructed with trusses or slabs . When subjected to a structural load , the cantilever carries the load to the support where it is forced against by a moment and shear stress . Cantilever construction allows for overhanging structures without external bracing, in contrast to constructions supported at both ends with loads applied between the supports, such as a simply supported beam found in a post and lintel system. CONTENTS * 1 In bridges, towers, and buildings * 2 Aircraft * 3 In microelectromechanical systems * 4 Chemical sensor applications * 5 In storage applications * 5.1 Warehouse storage * 5.2 Portable storage * 6 See also * 7 References * 8 External links IN BRIDGES, TOWERS, AND BUILDINGSCantilevers are widely found in construction, notably in cantilever bridges and balconies (see corbel ). In cantilever bridges the cantilevers are usually built as pairs, with each cantilever used to support one end of a central section. The Forth Bridge in Scotland is an example of a cantilever truss bridge . A cantilever in a traditionally timber framed building is called a jetty or forebay
[...More...]

"Cantilever" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

National Portrait Gallery (London)
2.06 million (2014) * Ranked 11th visitor attraction nationally (2014) * Ranked 22nd art museum globally (2014) DIRECTOR Nicholas Cullinan PUBLIC TRANSIT ACCESS Charing Cross Charing Cross ; Leicester Square ; Embankment WEBSITE npg.org.ukThe NATIONAL PORTRAIT GALLERY (NPG) is an art gallery in London housing a collection of portraits of historically important and famous British people . It was the first portrait gallery in the world when it opened in 1856. The gallery moved in 1896 to its current site at St Martin's Place, off Trafalgar Square , and adjoining the National Gallery . It has been expanded twice since then. The National Portrait Gallery also has regional outposts at Beningbrough Hall in Yorkshire and Montacute House
Montacute House
in Somerset
Somerset
. It is unconnected to the Scottish National Portrait
Portrait
Gallery in Edinburgh, with which its remit overlaps. The gallery is a non-departmental public body sponsored by the Department for Culture, Media and Sport
[...More...]

"National Portrait Gallery (London)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Ha-ha
A HA-HA is a recessed landscape design element that creates a vertical barrier while preserving an uninterrupted view of the landscape beyond. The design includes a turfed incline which slopes downward to a sharply vertical face, typically a masonry retaining wall. Ha-has are used in landscape design to prevent access to a garden, for example by grazing livestock, without obstructing views. In security design, the element is used to deter vehicular access to a site while minimizing visual obstruction. The name "ha-ha" may derive from the unexpected (i.e., amusing) moment of discovery when, on approach, the vertical drop suddenly becomes visible. CONTENTS * 1 Origins * 2 Examples * 3 See also * 4 References ORIGINS Ha-ha
Ha-ha
protecting the lawn at Hopetoun House , West Lothian , Scotland. Note how the wall disappears from view as it curves away to the left of the picture. Before mechanical lawn mowers, a common way to keep large areas of grassland trimmed was to allow livestock, usually sheep, to graze the grass. A ha-ha prevented grazing animals on large estates from gaining access to the lawn and gardens adjoining the house, giving a continuous vista to create the illusion that the garden and landscape were one and undivided. The ha-ha fit well with Chinese gardening ideas of concealing barriers with nature, but its European origins predate the European discovery of Chinese gardening
[...More...]

"Ha-ha" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

York
YORK (/ˈjɔːrk/ ( listen )) is a historic walled city at the confluence of the rivers Ouse and Foss in North Yorkshire
North Yorkshire
, England. The municipality is the traditional county town of Yorkshire
Yorkshire
to which it gives its name. The city has a rich heritage and has provided the backdrop to major political events in England throughout much of its two millennia of existence. The city offers a wealth of historic attractions, of which York Minster is the most prominent, and a variety of cultural and sporting activities making it a popular tourist destination for millions. The city was founded by the Romans as Eboracum in 71 AD. It became the capital of the Roman province of Britannia Inferior , and later of the kingdoms of Northumbria
Northumbria
and Jórvík . In the Middle Ages
Middle Ages
, York grew as a major wool trading centre and became the capital of the northern ecclesiastical province of the Church of England , a role it has retained. In the 19th century, York
York
became a hub of the railway network and a confectionery manufacturing centre. In recent decades, the economy of York
York
has moved from being dominated by its confectionery and railway-related industries to one that provides services
[...More...]

"York" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Ralph Bourchier
SIR RALPH BOURCHIER (c. 1531–11 June 1598) was an English landowner, administrator and politician. Beningbrough Hall, 1880 He was the son of James Bourchier of Haughton and Mary, heiress of her brother John Bannister. His grandfather was John Bourchier, 2nd Baron Berners . In 1556 he inherited estates in Yorkshire from his uncle, John Bannister, on which he built Beningbrough Hall (since rebuilt in 1716). He was appointed keeper of Rochester castle in 1559. He was elected to Parliament in 1571 and 1572 as MP for Newcastle-under-Lyme . He was subsequently returned for Newport, IoW in 1584, Scarborough in 1586 and as knight of the shire for Yorkshire . He served as sheriff of Yorkshire in 1580 and was knighted in 1584, He died in 1598 and was buried in Barking, Essex. He had married three times: firstly Elizabeth, the daughter of Francis Hall of Grantham, Lincolnshire, with whom he had two sons and four daughters; secondly Christian, the daughter of Rowland Shakerley of London and widow of John Harding of London; and thirdly Anne Coote, a widow. His estate went to his grandson Robert, as his son William was declared insane. Robert died childless at 18 and the estate then passed to Robert's brother John , who subscribed as an adventurer for Virginia in 1620 and was one of the signatories to King Charles death warrant in 1649. REFERENCES * History of Parliament - BOURCHIER, Ralph (c.1531-98), of Haughton, Staffs
[...More...]

"Ralph Bourchier" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

High Sheriff Of Yorkshire
The Sheriff is the oldest secular office under the Crown. Formerly the Sheriff was the principal law enforcement officer in the county but over the centuries most of the responsibilities associated with the post have been transferred elsewhere or are now defunct, so that its functions are now largely ceremonial. Sheriff is a title originating in the time of the Angles , not long after the invasion of the Kingdom of England , which was in existence for around a thousand years. A list of the sheriffs from the Norman conquest onwards can be found below. The Shrievalties are the oldest secular titles under the Crown in England and Wales, their purpose being to represent the monarch at a local level, historically in the shires . The office was a powerful position in earlier times, especially in the case of Yorkshire , which covers a very large area. The sheriffs were responsible for the maintenance of law and order and various other roles. Some of their powers in Yorkshire were relinquished in 1547 as the Lord Lieutenant of Yorkshire was instated to deal with military duties. It was only in 1908 under Edward VII of the Un