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Benedictine
The Order of Saint Benedict
Order of Saint Benedict
(OSB; Latin: Ordo Sancti Benedicti), also known – in reference to the colour of its members' habits – as the Black Monks, is a Catholic religious order
Catholic religious order
of independent monastic communities that observe the Rule of Saint Benedict. Each community (monastery, priory or abbey) within the order maintains its own autonomy, while the order itself represents their mutual interests
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San Marco, Florence
San Marco is the name of a religious complex in Florence, Italy. It comprises a church and a convent. The convent, which is now a museum, has three claims to fame. During the 15th century it was home to two famous Dominicans, the painter Fra Angelico
Fra Angelico
and the preacher Girolamo Savonarola. Also housed at the convent is a famous collection of manuscripts in a library built by Michelozzo.Contents1 History 2 Vallumbrosans and Sylvestrines 3 The Medici Reconstruction3.1 Church 3.2 Convent4 The Savonarola Era 5 Recent Times 6 External linksHistory[edit] Vallumbrosans and Sylvestrines[edit] The present convent occupies the site where a Vallombrosan monastery existed in the 12th century, which later passed to the Sylvestrine monks. Both of these groups were branches of the Order of St. Benedict
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Gregory Of Tours
Saint Gregory of Tours
Tours
(30 November c. 538 – 17 November 594) was a Gallo-Roman
Gallo-Roman
historian and Bishop of Tours, which made him a leading prelate of the area that had been previously referred to as Gaul
Gaul
by the Romans. He was born Georgius Florentius and later added the name Gregorius in honour of his maternal great-grandfather.[2] He is the primary contemporary source for Merovingian
Merovingian
history. His most notable work was his Decem Libri Historiarum (Ten Books of Histories), better known as the Historia Francorum ( History
History
of the Franks), a title that later chroniclers gave to it, but he is also known for his accounts of the miracles of saints, especially four books of the miracles of St. Martin of Tours. St. Martin's tomb was a major pilgrimage destination in the 6th century, and St
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Papal Brief
Corpus Juris CanoniciDecretist Regulæ Juris Decretals of Gregory IXDecretalistDecretum Gratiani Extravagantes Liber SeptimusAncient Church OrdersDidache The Apostolic ConstitutionsCanons of the ApostlesCollections of ancient canonsCollectiones canonum Dionysianae Collectio canonum quadripartita Collectio canonum Quesnelliana Collectio canonum WigorniensisOtherPseudo-Isidorian Decretals Benedictus Deus (Pius IV) Contractum trinius Defect of Birth Jus exclusivae Papal appointmentOriental lawCode of Canons of the Eastern Churches Eastern Canonical Reforms of Pius XII Nomocanon ArcheparchyEparchyLiturgical lawEcclesia Dei Mysterii Paschalis Sacrosanctum conciliumMusicam sacramSummorum Pontificum Tra le sollecitudiniSacramental lawCanon 844 Ex opere operato Omnium in mentem Valid but illicitHoly OrdersImpediment (canon law)Abstemius


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Fresco
Fresco
Fresco
(plural frescos or frescoes) is a technique of mural painting executed upon freshly laid, or wet lime plaster. Water
Water
is used as the vehicle for the dry-powder pigment to merge with the plaster, and with the setting of the plaster, the painting becomes an integral part of the wall. The word fresco (Italian: affresco) is derived from the Italian adjective fresco meaning "fresh", and may thus be contrasted with fresco-secco or secco mural painting techniques, which are applied to dried plaster, to supplement painting in fresco
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Fra Angelico
Fra
Fra
Angelico (born Guido di Pietro; c. 1395[2] – February 18, 1455) was an Early Italian Renaissance
Italian Renaissance
painter described by Vasari
Vasari
in his Lives of the Artists as having "a rare and perfect talent".[3] He was known to contemporaries as Fra
Fra
Giovanni da Fiesole
Fiesole
(Brother John of Fiesole) and Fra
Fra
Giovanni Angelico (Angelic Brother John). In modern Italian he is called il Beato Angelico (Blessed Angelic One);[4] the common English name Fra
Fra
Angelico means the "Angelic friar". In 1982, Pope John Paul II
Pope John Paul II
proclaimed his beatification[5] in recognition of the holiness of his life, thereby making the title of "Blessed" official
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Cenobium
Cenobitic (or coenobitic) monasticism is a monastic tradition that stresses community life. Often in the West the community belongs to a religious order, and the life of the cenobitic monk is regulated by a religious rule, a collection of precepts. The older style of monasticism, to live as a hermit, is called eremitic. A third form of monasticism, found primarily in Eastern Christianity, is the skete. The English words "cenobite" and "cenobitic" are derived, via Latin, from the Greek words koinos (κοινός), "common", and bios (βίος), "life". The adjective can also be cenobiac (κοινοβιακός, koinobiakos)
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Florence
Florence
Florence
(/ˈflɒrəns/ FLORR-ənss; Italian: Firenze [fiˈrɛntse] ( listen))[2] is the capital city of the Italian region of Tuscany. It is the most populous city in Tuscany, with 383,083 inhabitants in 2013, and over 1,520,000 in its metropolitan area.[3] Florence
Florence
was a centre of medieval European trade and finance and one of the wealthiest cities of that era.[4] It is considered the birthplace of the Renaissance, and has been called "the Athens
Athens
of the Middle Ages".[5] A turbulent political history includes periods of rule by the powerful Medici family and numerous religious and republican revolutions.[6] From 1865 to 1871 the city was the capital of the recently established Kingdom of Italy
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Honoratus
Honoratus
Honoratus
(French: Saint Honorat or Saint Honoré; c. 350 – January 6, 429) was an early Archbishop of Arles, who was also the Abbot of Lérins Abbey. He is honored as a saint in the Catholic Church.Contents1 Life 2 La Vida de Sant Honorat 3 Legacy 4 Gallery 5 ReferencesLife[edit] There is some disagreement concerning his place of birth and the date of his death. According to certain authors, January 14 or January 15. It is believed that he was born in the north of Gaul
Gaul
and that he belonged to a consular Roman family.[4] Honoratus
Honoratus
received an outstanding education.[5] Converted to Christianity
Christianity
with his brother Venantius, he embarked with him from Marseilles
Marseilles
about 368, under the guidance of a holy person named Caprasius, to visit the holy places of Palestine and the lauræ of Syria
Syria
and Egypt
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Superior General
A Superior General or General Superior is the leader or head of a religious institute in the Roman Catholic Church. The Superior General usually holds supreme executive authority in the religious order, while the general chapter has legislative authority.[citation needed] The figure of Superior General first emerged in the thirteenth century with the development of the centralized government of the Mendicant Orders. The Friars Minor (Franciscans) organized their community under a Minister General, and the Order of Preachers (Dominicans) appointed a Master General.[citation needed] Due to restrictions on women religious, especially the obligation of cloister for nuns, congregations of women were not initially able to organize with their own Superior General. In 1609, Mary Ward was the superior general of a religious institute that imitated the Jesuit model, but the institute was not accepted by the Roman Curia
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Motherhouse
If Wiktionary
Wiktionary
has a definition already, change this tag to TWCleanup2 or else consider a soft redirect to Wiktionary
Wiktionary
by replacing the text on this page with Wi
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Anno Domini
The terms anno Domini[a][1][2] (AD) and before Christ[b][3][4][5] (BC) are used to label or number years in the Julian and Gregorian calendars. The term anno Domini is Medieval Latin
Medieval Latin
and means "in the year of the Lord",[6] but is often presented using "our Lord" instead of "the Lord",[7][8] taken from the full original phrase "anno Domini nostri Jesu Christi", which translates to "in the year of our Lord Jesus
Jesus
Christ". This calendar era is based on the traditionally reckoned year of the conception or birth of Jesus
Jesus
of Nazareth, with AD counting years from the start of this epoch, and BC denoting years before the start of the era. There is no year zero in this scheme, so the year AD 1 immediately follows the year 1 BC
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Latin
Latin
Latin
(Latin: lingua latīna, IPA: [ˈlɪŋɡʷa laˈtiːna]) is a classical language belonging to the Italic branch of the Indo-European languages. The Latin alphabet
Latin alphabet
is derived from the Etruscan and Greek alphabets, and ultimately from the Phoenician alphabet. Latin
Latin
was originally spoken in Latium, in the Italian Peninsula.[3] Through the power of the Roman Republic, it became the dominant language, initially in Italy and subsequently throughout the Roman Empire. Vulgar Latin
Vulgar Latin
developed into the Romance languages, such as Italian, Portuguese, Spanish, French, and Romanian. Latin, Greek and French have contributed many words to the English language
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English Reformation
The English Reformation
Reformation
was a series of events in 16th century England by which the Church of England
Church of England
broke away from the authority of the Pope and the Roman Catholic Church. These events were, in part, associated with the wider process of the European Protestant Reformation, a religious and political movement that affected the practice of Christianity
Christianity
across western and central Europe during this period. Many factors contributed to the process: the decline of feudalism and the rise of nationalism, the rise of the common law, the invention of the printing press and increased circulation of the Bible, and the transmission of new knowledge and ideas among scholars, the upper and middle classes and readers in general
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OSB (other)
Disambiguation usually refers to word-sense disambiguation, the process of identifying which meaning of a word is used in context. Disambiguation may also refer to:Sentence boundary disambiguation, the problem in natural language processing of deciding where sentences begin and end Syntactic disambiguation, the problem of resolving syntactic ambiguity Memory disambiguation, a set of microprocessor execution techniquesMusic[edit]Ø (Disambiguation), a 2010 album by Underoath Disambiguation (Pandelis Karayorgis album), a 2002 album by Pandelis Karayorgis and Mat ManeriSee also[edit]Ambiguity, an attribute of any concept, idea, statement or claim whose meaning, intention or interpretation cannot be definitively resolvedThis disambiguation page lists articles associated with the title Disambiguation. If an internal link led you here, you may wish to change the link to point directly to the
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Yorkshire
Yorkshire
Yorkshire
(/ˈjɔːrkʃər, -ʃɪər/; abbreviated Yorks), formally known as the County of York, is a historic county of Northern England and the largest in the United Kingdom.[3] Due to its great size in comparison to other English counties, functions have been undertaken over time by its subdivisions, which have also been subject to periodic reform
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