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Belgians
Belgians
Belgians
(Dutch: Belgen, French: Belges, German: Belgier) are people identified with the Kingdom of Belgium, a federal state in Western Europe. As Belgium
Belgium
is a multinational state, this connection may be residential, legal, historical, or cultural rather than ethnic. Majority of Belgians, however, belong to two distinct ethnic groups or communities (Dutch: gemeenschap or French: communauté) native to the country, Flemings
Flemings
who speak Dutch in the north, on the border with the Netherlands, and Walloons who speak French and/or Walloon to the south, on the border with France
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Nationality
Nationality
Nationality
is a legal relationship between an individual person and a state.[1] Nationality
Nationality
affords the state jurisdiction over the person and affords the person the protection of the state. What these rights and duties are varies from state to state.[2] By custom and international conventions, it is the right of each state to determine who its nationals are.[3] Such determinations are part of nationality law. In some cases, determinations of nationality are also governed by public international law—for example, by treaties on statelessness and the European Convention on Nationality. Nationality
Nationality
differs technically and legally from citizenship, which is a different legal relationship between a person and a country. The noun national can include both citizens and non-citizens
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Roman Province
In Ancient Rome, a province (Latin: provincia, pl. provinciae) was the basic, and, until the Tetrarchy
Tetrarchy
(293 AD), largest territorial and administrative unit of the empire's territorial possessions outside Italy. The word province in modern English has its origins in the term used by the Romans. Provinces were generally governed by politicians of senatorial rank, usually former consuls or former praetors. A later exception was the province of Egypt, incorporated by Augustus
Augustus
after the death of Cleopatra: it was ruled by a governor of equestrian rank only, perhaps as a discouragement to senatorial ambition
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Dutch Language
 Aruba  Belgium  Curaçao  Netherlands  Sint Maarten  Suriname Benelux European Union South American Union CaricomRegulated by Nederlandse Taalunie (Dutch Language Union)Language codesISO 639-1 nlISO 639-2 dut (B) nld (T)ISO 639-3 nld Dutch/FlemishGlottolog mode1257[4]Linguasphere 52-ACB-aDutch-speaking world (included are areas of daughter-language Afrikaans)Distribution of the Dutch language
Dutch language
and its dialects in Western EuropeThis article contains IPA phonetic symbols. Without proper rendering support, you may see question marks, boxes, or other symbols instead of Unicode
Unicode
characters
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Federation
A federation (also known as a federal state) is a political entity characterized by a union of partially self-governing states or regions under a central (federal) government. In a federation, the self-governing status of the component states, as well as the division of power between them and the central government, is typically constitutionally entrenched and may not be altered by a unilateral decision of either party, the states or the federal political body. Alternatively, federation is a form of government in which sovereign power is formally divided between a central authority and a number of constituent regions so that each region retains some degree of control over its internal affairs.[1][2] The governmental or constitutional structure found in a federation is considered to be federalist, or to be an example of federalism. It can be considered the opposite of another system, the unitary state. France, for example, has been unitary for multiple centuries
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Western Europe
Western Europe
Europe
is the region comprising the western part of Europe. Below, some different geographic, geopolitical and cultural definitions of the term are outlined. Significant historical events that have shaped the concept of Western Europe
Europe
include the rise of Rome, the adoption of Greek cultu
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Multinational State
A multinational state is a sovereign state that comprises two or more nations. This is in contrast to a nation state, where a single nation accounts for the bulk of the population. Depending on the definition of "nation" (which touches on ethnicity, language, and political identity), a multinational state might also be multicultural or multilingual. Present-day examples of multinational states are Afghanistan, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Canada, China, Ethiopia, India, Indonesia, Iraq, Madagascar, Montenegro, Nigeria, Pakistan, Russia, South Africa, Spain, Turkey, and the United Kingdom. Historical multinational states that have since split into multiple sovereign states include Austria-Hungary, British India, Czechoslovakia, the Empire of Japan, the Soviet Union, and Yugoslavia
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Walloon Language
Walloon (Walon in Walloon) is a Romance language
Romance language
that is spoken as a primary language in large portions (70%) of Wallonia
Wallonia
in Belgium, in some villages of Northern France
France
(near Givet) and in the northeast part of Wisconsin[3] until the mid 20th century and in some parts of Canada[citation needed]. It belongs to the langue d'oïl language family, whose most prominent member is the French language. The historical background of its formation was the territorial extension since 980 of the Principality of Liège
Principality of Liège
to the south and west. Despite its rich literature, beginning anonymously in the 16th century and with well-known authors since 1756, the use of Walloon has decreased markedly since France's annexation of Wallonia
Wallonia
in 1795
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Gallia Belgica
Gallia Belgica
Gallia Belgica
("Belgic Gaul") was a province of the Roman empire located in the north-eastern part of Roman Gaul, in what is today primarily Belgium, Luxembourg
Luxembourg
and the Netherlands. In 50 BC after the conquest by Julius Caesar
Julius Caesar
during his Gallic Wars, it became one of the three main provinces of Gaul
Gaul
(known as the Tres Galliae, the other two being Gallia Aquitania
Gallia Aquitania
and Gallia Lugdunensis).[1] An official Roman province
Roman province
was later created by emperor Augustus
Augustus
in 22 BC. The province was named for the Belgae, as the largest tribal confederation in the area, but also included the territories of the Treveri, Mediomatrici, Leuci, Sequani, Helvetii
Helvetii
and others
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Gaul
Gaul
Gaul
(Latin: Gallia) was a region of Western Europe
Western Europe
during the Iron Age that was inhabited by Celtic tribes, encompassing present day France, Luxembourg, Belgium, most of Switzerland, Northern Italy, as well as the parts of the Netherlands
Netherlands
and Germany
Germany
on the west bank of the Rhine. It covered an area of 494,000 km2 (191,000 sq mi).[1] According to the testimony of Julius Caesar, Gaul
Gaul
was divided into three parts: Gallia Celtica, Belgica and Aquitania
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French People
118,000[17][18]Other countries Mexico 60,000[19] Algeria 32,000[10] China 31,000[10] Luxembourg 31,000[10][20] Hong Kong 25,000[21] Netherlands 23,000[10] Senegal 20,000[10] Mauritius 15,000[22] Monaco 10,000[23] Sweden 9,005[24] Austria8,246[25]LanguagesFrench and other languages (Langues d'oïl Occitan Auvergnat Corsican Catalan Franco-Provençal German (Alsatian & Franconian) Dutch (French Flemish) Breton Basque)ReligionPredominantly Roman Catholicism[26] Minority : Protestantism Judaism IslamRelated ethnic groupsCeltic peoples Romance peoples Germanic peoplesThe French (French: Français) are an ethnic group[27][28][29] and nation who are identified with the country of France
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Celts
Pontic SteppeDomestication of the horse Kurgan Kurgan
Kurgan
culture Steppe culturesBug-Dniester Sredny Stog Dnieper-Donets Samara Khvalynsk YamnaMikhaylovka cultureCaucasusMaykopEast-AsiaAfanasevoEastern EuropeUsatovo Cernavodă CucuteniNorthern EuropeCorded wareBaden Middle Dnieper Bronze
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United States Of Belgium
The United Belgian States
United Belgian States
or United Netherlandish States (Dutch: Verenigde Nederlandse Staten or Verenigde Belgische Staten, French: États-Belgiques-Unis, Latin: Foederati belgii), also known as the United States of Belgium, was a confederation in the Southern Netherlands
Netherlands
(modern-day Belgium) which was established after the Brabant Revolution
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Adjective
In linguistics, an adjective (abbreviated adj) is a describing word, the main syntactic role of which is to qualify a noun or noun phrase, giving more information about the object signified.[1] Adjectives are one of the English parts of speech, although historically they were classed together with the nouns.[2] Certain words that were traditionally considered to be adjectives, including the, this, my, etc., are today usually classed separately, as determiners.Contents1 Etymology 2 Types of use 3 Distribution 4 Adverbs 5 Determiners 6 Adjective phrases 7 Other modifiers of nouns 8 Order 9 Comparison 10 Restrictiveness 11 Agreement 12 See also 13 References 14 Bibliography 15 External linksEtymology[edit] See also:
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Low Countries
The Low Countries
Low Countries
or, in the geographic sense of the term, the Netherlands
Netherlands
(Dutch: de Lage Landen or de Nederlanden, French: les Pays Bas) is a coastal region in northwestern Europe, consisting especially of the Netherlands
Netherlands
and Belgium, and the low-lying delta of the Rhine, Meuse, Scheldt, and Ems rivers where much of the land is at or below sea level.[1][2] This wide area of Western Europe
Europe
roughly stretches from the French département du Nord at its southwestern point, to German East Frisia
East Frisia
at its northeastern point. The Netherlands
Netherlands
is often considered to include inland areas with strong links, such as Luxembourg
Luxembourg
today, and historically, parts of the German Rhineland
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Netherlands (toponymy)
The Low Countries (Dutch: de Lage Landen or de Nederlanden, French: les Pays-Bas) is the coastal Rhine–Meuse–Scheldt delta region in Western Europe whose definition usually includes the modern countries of Luxembourg, Belgium and the Netherlands.[1][2] Both Belgium and the Netherlands derived their names from earlier names for the region, due to nether meaning "low" and Belgica being the Latinized name for all the Low Countries,[3] a nomenclature that went obsolete after Belgium's secession in 1830. The Low Countries—and the Netherlands and Belgium—had in their history exceptionally many and widely varying names, resulting in equally varying names in different languages. There is diversity even within languages: the use of one word for the country and another for the adjective form is common. This holds for English, where Dutch is the adjective form for the country "the Netherlands"
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