HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

picture info

Belgian Air Component
The Belgian Air Component
Belgian Air Component
(Dutch: Luchtcomponent, French: Composante air) is the air arm of the Belgian Armed Forces,[1][2] and until January 2002 it was officially known as the Belgian Air Force
Belgian Air Force
(Dutch: Belgische Luchtmacht; French: Force aérienne belge)
[...More...]

"Belgian Air Component" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Adolphe DuBois D'Aische
Sergeant
Sergeant
Adolphe Alois de Gonzague Marie Hubert Ghislain du Bois d'Aische was a Belgian
Belgian
World War I flying ace credited with six aerial victories. Serving in the French Air Service, he was the oldest ace in the war, scoring his fifth (and sixth) victories when he was 43 years of age.[1]Contents1 Early life 2 First World War 3 Later life 4 Sources of information 5 See alsoEarly life[edit] d'Aische was born in Brussels
Brussels
in 1874. He was a scion (lineal descendant) of Walloon nobility whose lineage dated back to the 15th century. d'Aische moved to the Belgian
Belgian
Congo when his father opposed his desire to study engineering and attempted to arrange a suitable bride for his son. In 1904, he enlisted in the French Foreign Legion where he learnt to speak German and became a French citizen
[...More...]

"Adolphe DuBois D'Aische" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Third Battle Of Ypres
 British Empire Australia  Canada  India  Newfoundland  New Zealand  South Africa  Southern Rhodesia  United Kingdom France  Belgium  German EmpireCommanders and leaders Douglas Haig Hubert Gough Herbert Plumer François Anthoine Louis Ruquoy Erich Ludendorff Crown Prince Rupprecht of Bavaria Friedrich Sixt von ArminStrength 50 divisions 6 divisions 77–83 divisionsCasualties and losses200,000–448,614 (disputed, see Casualties section) 217,000–410,000 including 24,065 prisoners (disputed, see Casualties section)PasschendaelePasschendaele (Passendale) a Belgian village in the Zonnebeke municipality of West Flanders
[...More...]

"Third Battle Of Ypres" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Albatros Flugzeugwerke
Albatros-Flugzeugwerke GmbH was a German aircraft manufacturer best known for supplying the German airforces during World War I. The company was based in Johannisthal, Berlin, where it was founded by Walter Huth and Otto Wiener on December 20, 1909.[1] The company (and its subsidiary, Ostdeutsche Albatros Werke (OAW)) produced some of the most capable fighter aircraft of World War I, notably the Albatros D.III and Albatros D.V, both designed by Robert Thelen for the firm. The works continued to operate until 1931, when it was merged into Focke-Wulf.Contents1 History 2 Summary of aircraft built by Albatros Flugzeugwerke 3 References 4 External linksHistory[edit] The company was founded in Berlin-Johannisthal the end of 1909, by Enno Walther Huth, as Albatros Werke AG
[...More...]

"Albatros Flugzeugwerke" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Pusher Configuration
In a craft with a pusher configuration (as opposed to a tractor configuration), the propeller(s) are mounted behind their respective engine(s). According to British aviation author Bill Gunston, a "pusher propeller" is one mounted behind the engine, so that the drive shaft is in compression.[1] Pusher configuration
Pusher configuration
describes this specific (propeller or ducted fan) thrust device attached to a craft, either aerostat (airship) or aerodyne (aircraft, WIG, paramotor, rotorcraft) or others types such as hovercraft, airboat and propeller-driven snowmobiles.[note 1] "Pusher configuration" also describes the layout of a fixed-wing aircraft in which the thrust device has a pusher configuration. This kind of aircraft is commonly called a pusher
[...More...]

"Pusher Configuration" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Roeselare
Roeselare
Roeselare
(Dutch pronunciation: [ˈrusəlaːrə], French: Roulers, West Flemish: Roeseloare) is a Belgian city and municipality in the Flemish province of West Flanders. The municipality comprises the city of Roeselare
Roeselare
proper and the towns of Beveren, Oekene
Oekene
and Rumbeke. The name of the city is derived from two Germanic words meaning "reed" and "open space", i.e., a marsh in a forest glade
[...More...]

"Roeselare" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Houthulst
Houthulst
Houthulst
(Dutch pronunciation: [ˈɦʌutɦɵlst]) (West Flemish: Outulst) is a municipality located in the Belgian province of West Flanders. The municipality comprises the towns of Houthulst
Houthulst
proper, Jonkershove, Klerken
Klerken
and Merkem. On January 1, 2006, Houthulst
Houthulst
had a total population of 9,051. The total area is 55.89 km² which gives a population density of 162 inhabitants per km². Landmarks[edit]De "Sint-Jan Baptistkerk" (Church of Saint John the Baptist), rebuilt in 1924 after being completely destroyed during World War I. The Belgian Military Cemetery (nl), containing the graves of almost 1800 Belgian soldiers, killed during World War I. The cemetery also contains 81 Italian graves
[...More...]

"Houthulst" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Nieuport 10
The Nieuport
Nieuport
10 was a French First World War
First World War
sesquiplane that filled a wide variety of roles including reconnaissance, fighter and trainer.Contents1 Design and development 2 Operational Use 3 Variants 4 Operators 5 Survivors 6 Specifications ( Nieuport
Nieuport
10 C.1 fighter) 7 See also 8 References8.1 Footnotes 8.2 Bibliography9 External linksDesign and development[edit] In January 1914, designer Gustave Delage joined the Société Anonyme des Etablissements Nieuport, and started working on a series of aircraft that would remain in production for the remainder of the First World War. The Nieuport
Nieuport
10 was first of these and was originally designed to compete in the Gordon Bennett Trophy race of 1914
[...More...]

"Nieuport 10" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Nieuport 11
The Nieuport
Nieuport
11, nicknamed the Bébé, was a French World War I
World War I
single seat sesquiplane fighter aircraft, designed by Gustave Delage.[1] It was the primary aircraft that ended the
[...More...]

"Nieuport 11" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Groupe De Chasse
Groupe de Chasse or groupe de chasse (usually abbreviated as GC) is the French language
French language
term for "fighter group" or "fighter wing". More literal translations include "pursuit group" (the US term for fighter groups prior to 1942) and "hunting group" (similar to the German language Jagdgruppe or JG).Contents1 Composition 2 Units2.1 France3 ReferencesComposition[edit] A group de chasse may include one to four escadrilles, each of which comprises 10–12 aircraft
[...More...]

"Groupe De Chasse" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Etrich Taube
The Etrich Taube, also known by the names of the various later manufacturers who build versions of the type, such as the Rumpler Taube, was a pre- World War I
World War I
monoplane aircraft. It was the first military aeroplane to be mass-produced in Germany. The Taube was very popular prior to the First World War, and it was also used by the air forces of Italy
Italy
and Austria-Hungary. Even the Royal Flying Corps
Royal Flying Corps
operated at least one Taube in 1912
[...More...]

"Etrich Taube" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Lafayette Escadrille
The La Fayette Escadrille (French: Escadrille de La Fayette) was a U.S. volunteer unit constituted in 1916 under French command, who came forth to help France
France
during World War I. The escadrille of the Aéronautique Militaire, was composed largely of American volunteer pilots flying fighters. It was named in honor of the Marquis de La Fayette, French hero of the American Revolutionary War. There were also Portuguese aviators who participated in combat in the 1st World War (1914-1918) and flew on several French squadrons, including on the SPA-124 squadron.Lafayette Escadrille Pin ( Escadrille N 124) with bust of Chief Sitting Bull
[...More...]

"Lafayette Escadrille" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Nieuport 16
The Nieuport 11, nicknamed the Bébé, was a French World War I single seat sesquiplane fighter aircraft, designed by Gustave Delage.[1] It was the primary aircraft that ended the Fokker Scourge in 1916.[2] The type saw service with several of France's allies, and gave rise to the series of "vee-strut" Nieuport fighters that remained in service (latterly as trainers) into the 1920s.Contents1 Design and development1.1 Nieuport 162 Operational history 3 Variants 4 Operators 5 Survivors and reproductions 6 Specifications (Nieuport 11 C.1) 7 See also 8 References8.1 Notes 8.2 BibliographyDesign and development[edit]Royal Naval Air Service Nieuport 11The Nieuport 11 was a smaller, simplified version of the Nieuport 10, designed specifically as a single-seat fighter
[...More...]

"Nieuport 16" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

SPAD VII
The SPAD S.VII was the first of a series of highly successful biplane fighter aircraft produced by Société Pour L'Aviation et ses Dérivés (SPAD) during the First World War. Like its successors, the S.VII was renowned as a sturdy and rugged aircraft with good climbing and diving characteristics. It was also a stable gun platform, although pilots used to the more manoeuvrable Nieuport fighters found it heavy on the controls. It was flown by a number of the famous aces, such as France's Georges Guynemer, Italy's Francesco Baracca and Australia's Alexander Pentland.Contents1 Design and development1.1 Origins 1.2 Design 1.3 Variants and experiments2 Operational history2.1 France 2.2 Foreign Service3 Operators 4 Surviving aircraft 5 Specifications (S.VII) 6 See also 7 References 8 External linksDesign and development[edit] Origins[edit] Performance in early aircraft designs was largely dependent on engines
[...More...]

"SPAD VII" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Spad XIII
The SPAD S.XIII
SPAD S.XIII
was a French biplane fighter aircraft of the First World War, developed by Société Pour L'Aviation et ses Dérivés (SPAD) from the earlier and highly successful SPAD S.VII. During early 1917, the French designer Louis Béchereau, having observed the earlier S.VII having been rendered obsolete by rapid advances in the field of aviation and having been impressed by promises of a powerful new geared version of the successful Hispano-Suiza
Hispano-Suiza
8A engine, decided to launch the development of two new fighter aircraft, the S.XII and S.XIII. The S.XII was soon overshadowed by the S.XIII, pilots typically preferring the more orthodox armament arrangement of the latter over the former
[...More...]

"Spad XIII" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Flying Ace
A flying ace, fighter ace or air ace is a military aviator credited with shooting down several enemy aircraft during aerial combat. The actual number of aerial victories required to officially qualify as an "ace" has varied, but is usually considered to be five or more. The few aces among combat aviators have historically accounted for the majority of air-to-air victories in military history.[1] The concept of the "ace" emerged in 1915 during World War I, at the same time as aerial dogfighting. It was a propaganda term intended to provide the home front with a cult of the hero in what was otherwise a war of attrition. The individual actions of aces were widely reported and the image was disseminated of the ace as a chivalrous knight reminiscent of a bygone era.[2] For a brief early period when air-to-air combat was just being invented, the exceptionally skilled pilot could shape the battle in the skies
[...More...]

"Flying Ace" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
.